Tag Archives: Emergency First Aid Training

Cysts – Do you know what they are?

Cysts

What is a Cyst? This article is designed to help you understand more about yourself, others, and the medical world around you. Many view the word “Cyst” as being unclean, or infectious, or disease bearing. The truth about Cycts is actually quite far from those.

What are Cysts?

Cysts are one of the most common benign tumors of the skin. They present as a round, rubbery, mobile mass that stretches out the overlaying skin and is tethered to the surface of the skin by a pore or “punctum”, this “punctum“ acts like a tether that allows the Cyst to “float“ more often than not in the surrounding bodily fluids.

Cysts can be found “anywhere on or in the body, and anyone can have them.

The term “Cyst” refers to a fluid-filled structure of cells, whereas a tumor consist of a mass of abnormal cells with abnormal growth potential. Cysts are not associated with tumors typically as they have a very thin rim surrounding the fluid and may be popped, whereas a tumor would have a thickened rim that surrounds it that expands with time.

Types of Cysts – arachnoid, colloid, dermoid, epidermis, pineal, cervical, breast, ganglion, etc…

What causes a Cyst?

Cysts frequently result from a plugging of the pore. A sac of skin forms and gets larger as it becomes filled with keratin, a component of your skin cells, CSF “Cerebral Spinal Fluid“, colloid, or blood. Keratin is a pasty, whitish material that sometimes can be expressed from the cyst and tends to have a foul odor.

Is a Cyst Harmful?

Often No, however there are circumstances where they could cause damage, lack of blood flow, or harmful pressure to build up on the surrounding tissue and organs. Normally cysts are “benign” and do not develop into cancers. Once in a while, they may rupture and become inflamed which results in redness, swelling and pain in the area. Sometimes pus will drain. To avoid inflammation or infection of a cysts, it is best “not” to squeeze it.

Does a Cyst need to be removed?

The majority of cysts cause no problems and therefore do not need to be removed, it is the location of the cyst and the level of discomfort that will dictate your desire to have them removed. On occasion, a cyst may become objectionably large, interfere with function, get inflamed or are symptomatic. In these cases, removal is achieved by local surgical excision. Small, asymptomatic cysts may be removed electively by contracting your physician to arrange an elective removal. “Always consult your physician before making body modifications.”

Very often, cysts do not produce any symptoms and do not enlarge over time. If a cyst is not causing symptoms and is not thought to be associated with a tumor, you might never develop a problem with the cyst. An operation to remove the cyst might carry a greater risk than living with the cyst. Your doctor can help you weight the risks of “watching and waiting” with the risks of undergoing surgery.

How can a doctor tell if the cyst is not cancerous? A CT “Cat Scan” or particularly, an MRI scan of a cyst generally shows no solid or nodular components that could suggest an associated “malignant tumor”. Sometimes, when a cyst appears benign but the doctor cannot be 100% certain, repeated radiological studies over time will be recommended. A malignant tumor would be expected to grow over time, whereas a benign cyst might not.

Is radiation therapy ever used to treat a Cyst? In general, radiation is used to kill dividing cells “cancerous growth”. The fluid inside a cyst does not contain dividing cells, and the cells forming the walls of most cysts “including arachnoid, colloid, dermoid, epidermis, and pineal cysts” are not dividing. If the cyst is suspected of being malignant or tumor related a pointed dose of radiation may be injected “into” the cyst to destroy the cells within, however this is rare and your physician would know more.

Will I develop more Cysts?

You may develop more cysts over time and there is no way to prevent this from happening. You may also only ever have one cyst in your lifetime. Cysts have many factors which allow the cells to grow in such a manor, environment, radiation exposure, mould, bacteria, viruses, the reason why a cyst would appear is quite vast and unfortunately not always apparent.

In general, if the wall of the cyst is completely removed, the chance of the cyst recurrence I quite low. If the cyst is drained but the “bubble” or sack that contained the fluid is left intact, the odds of fluid re-accumulating are much higher as the cell walls may “heal” and reseal fluid within.

Do I have a disease if I have a Cyst?

  • Answer – “No”

A cyst is a random event that does have some factors too their appearance. Typically a Cyst does not have an associated disease or cause, they are a random occurrence that anyone could have.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd

#FirstAidCourseEdmonton #FirstAidAndBasicLifeSupport #BasicLifeSupport #BLS #BLSforHCP #BCLS #BCLSCourseEdmonton #ACLS #AdvancedCardiovascularLifeSupport #MFR #EmergencyMedicalResponder #ITLS #Cyst #GanglionCyst #OvarianCyst

What is Impetigo?

What is Impetigo?

Impetigo is a bacterial skin infection often found on the face, bottom and hands caused by “streptococcus and Staphylococcus aureus AKA: staph” bacteria. It is commonly known as “school sores” because a majority of cases are in school-aged children. However, it can also affect infants, adults and adolescents.

Uncomplicated Impetigo does “not” cause permanent damage to the skin, but is “HIGHLY contagious.

What does it look like?

“Impetigo can easily be misdiagnosed on first glance as Hand Foot & Mouth or even Herpes”.

Impetigo occurs in two forms, blistering and crusted. In Blistering Impetigo the blisters arise on previously normal skin, and “rapidly” grow in size and number. The blisters quickly burst and leave slightly moist or glazed areas with a brown/yellow crust at the edge. The spots expand even after they break open and can be many centimetres wide. They sometimes clear in the centre to produce ring shaped patterns. They are “not” usually painful, but can be itchy.

Impetigo usually appears around the nose, mouth, and other parts of the face. It can also appear on any skin not covered by clothes, such as arms and legs. Impetigo may even appear on the groin or buttocks.

  • In severe cases of impetigo there may be swelling of the lymph glands in the face or neck, severe pain, worsening redness, weakness and fever. “Consult your physician immediately”

Crusted Impetigo has a thick soft yellow crust. Beneath this crust is a moist red area. Crusted Impetigo spots grow slowly and are always smaller than the fully developed spots of blistering Impetigo. They are “not” usually painful, but can be itchy.

Impetigo can occur on top of other skin conditions, particularly itchy ones. When the skin is scratched the infection can enter through the broke skin. Some of these conditions are atopic dermatitis “eczema”, scabies, insect bites and head lice.

In cases where a larger area of skin is affected, patience may also have a fever, swollen lymph nodes or feel generally unwell.

How is it diagnosed?

Your doctor may diagnose impetigo based on a visual inspection of the blisters/sores, or by taking a swab to test for bacteria and check which antibiotic to use. The result of the swab takes several days.

How is it treated?

Depending on how bad the infection is, your doctor may recommend the use of an antibiotic ointment or oral antibiotics in severe cases. Antibiotic ointment should be continued until the sores have completely healed. If oral antibiotics are given it is important to finish the whole course of treatment “usually 5 days” and not stop when the impetigo starts to clear. “The blemishes may vanish but the bacteria may remain”.

Sores should be cleaned every 8-12 hours “Soap and Water”, dried thoroughly and covered with a waterproof dressing. Bathing the blisters with salty water will help to dry them out “use saline solution or dissolve about half a teaspoon of salt in a cup of water”.

How is it Spread?

Impetigo is very easy to catch from other people! Impetigo is usually spread through direct contact with other infected people.

The Bacteria primarily enters through damaged skin. People with conditions causing long term damage to their skin, such as eczema or atopic dermatitis, are at greater risk of infection.

How can you avoid spreading the infection?

“While you have the infection”:

  • Sores should be kept clean and covered with a waterproof dressing to prevent them being touched or scratched.
  • Used dressings should be placed in a sealed bag and put in the garbage bin as soon as they are removed.
  • Hands should be washed thoroughly with soap and running water for 10-15 seconds after sores are touched or redressed.

Children with impetigo should be kept home from school or other group settings if their wounds cannot be kept covered until 24 hours after antibiotic treatment has been started, or until the blisters have dried out if antibiotics are not used.

Bedding “Pillow Cases” should be changed and washed each day.

To Prevent Impetigo children should be taught:

  • To wash their hands often with soap.
  • Not to scratch scabs or pick their nose.
  • Not to share their clothes, towels, pillowcases, or toothbrushes
  • To have scratches and cuts cleaned and covered

Parents should be careful not to allow items such as clothes, towels, bed sheets, razors or toothbrushes used by the affected person to be used by others. Other grooming items, such as nail scissors or tweezers, should be disinfected / washed thoroughly after each use.

School and Childcare Impetigo Prevention.

In addition to general hygiene measures, specific measures to prevent spread in schools and childcare include”

  • Teachers, children and families should understand the importance of hand washing, covering sores and staying home if sick.

Hand washing products “soap dispensers, running water and paper towels” should be available and accessible.

Activities should allow time for hand washing as part of routine practice “before eating and after going to the toilet”

Temporary exclusion from child care or school if their wounds cannot be kept covered until 24 hours after antibiotic treatment as been started, or until the blisters have dried out if antibiotics are not used.

Surfaces such as counters, desks and toys that come in contact with uncovered or poorly covered infections, should be cleaned daily with detergent, and whenever visibly contaminated.

Impetigo “is” dangerous for babies!

It is important for people with Impetigo to keep away from newborns and young babies. Newborn babies are particularly susceptible to impetigo and because their immune systems are not fully developed. This can lead to serious complications, if you suspect your newborn has Impetigo see your physician immediately.

In severe cases of impetigo there may be swelling of the lymph glands in the face or neck, severe pain, worsening redness, weakness and fever. If you or your child has these symptoms, see your physician immediately.

What is the public health response?

Impetigo does “not” need to be reported to Alberta Health Services. Public health units can advise on the control of outbreaks. Schools and Childcare settings must notify parents of students who have potential to contract Impetigo, Parents, Guardians and care givers should be made aware of signs and symptoms and treatment methods that are available to prevent the spread.

Group A streptococcal infection may lead to other rare conditions such as acute post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis 3-6 weeks after the skin infection, which is associated with antibodies produced to fight streptococcal infection. “Consult your physician”

  • In communities in “Australia” that have cases of rheumatic heart disease, episodes of acute rheumatic fever are thought to be triggered by impetigo as well as by throat infections with group A Streptococcus. In those communities prompt treatment and control of impetigo is an important part of preventing rheumatic heart disease.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd

#FirstAidCourseEdmonton #FirstAidAndBasicLifeSupport #BasicLifeSupport #BLS #BLSforHCP #BCLS #BCLSCourseEdmonton #ACLS #AdvancedCardiovascularLifeSupport #MFR #EmergencyMedicalResponder #ITLS #Impetigo #FaceBlisters

“HELP!!!” Emergency numbers of Alberta – Knowledge worth Knowing.

“HELP!!!” Emergency numbers of Alberta – Knowledge worth Knowing.

In Alberta Canada many people don’t know what “HELP” is available during an emergency. Who would you call if there was a wild or strange animal in your yard or in the neighborhood? If I am alone and frightened, depressed, scared of someone or something I cant explain who can I call? What is the Poison Control number? Animal Control? Fire? Ambulance? Police? These questions we’ll address as the Canadian Government has put some “Quick Access Numbers” into use that will help. We’ll explain below what each one is and how to utilize them.

911

In Alberta Canada like many other provinces 911 handles a multitude of Emergency Related phone calls. For this reason the Canadian Government has linked 911 to many other emergency hot lines to help streamline the process of getting Emergency Service Workers in touch with you. For this reason, This will help you as you only need to remember 911 and the 911 Dispatcher will help get you to the right emergency connection line. 911 is linked to:

  • – Animal Control,
  • – Poison Control,
  • – Police,
  • – Ambulance,
  • -Fire
  • – CSIS.

811

Health Link” a 24/7 call center provides a number of clinical services including tele-triage and health advice, navigation services and online content support for all Albertans by calling 811 or by using one of its companion web products, MyHealth.Alberta.ca or informAlberta.ca. The specific services include:

  • – Symptom-based nurse triage and health information
  • – System navigation
  • – Dementia Advice Service
  • – Catch-A-Break Osteoporosis screening
  • – AlbertaQuits Tobacco Helpline
  • – Addictions information and referral
  • – Central Access to specialized services
  • – Referrals to clinical services including Specialized Medication Advice and Dietitian Services

711

“NOT IN SERVICE”

611

“Phone Service Line” Will not help during emergencies

511

Traffic Information – Transportation Canada “Alberta” has put this number into service to help those on the highway remain safe and in the know. Road conditions can change rapidly as our weather changes along with driver conditions. This number will help you get in touch with an Automated / Representative that can help give you “Journey Management Options and risk levels” Drive safe

  • -“Remember” Stay Alive, Don’t Drink & Drive or Toke & Drive

411

Directory Services” This is a phone service which will connect you with the Canada 411 Phone Directory.

311

Municipal Services” 311 provides citizens with the choice of accessing Municipal information and services. 311 Citizen Services is your single point of contact for local government information and non-emergency services. Whether you’re a resident, a business owner, or a visitor, your connection to The City is at your finger tips. Non-English-speaking callers may request the assistance of an interpreter. The 311 agent will connect with an external interpretive service to assist with the call. The interpretive service offers assistance in more than 150 languages.

211

Community Health & Social Services” 211 is a free, confidential, multilingual, 24 hour information and referral system. 211 provides information on government and community based health and social services. 211 is available across the province. 211 can help with day-to-day needs and coping with stressful situations before they escalate into a crisis.

211 can provide support in the following situations:

• When you are looking for home care supports for seniors or individuals with disabilities

• When you are trying to find a job

• When you are looking for affordable childcare

• When you want to know where you can volunteer or donate your second-hand items

• When you don’t know where to go for alcohol and/or drug detoxification

• If you are thinking of post-secondary schooling and need to complete your high school diploma or find out how to apply for student loans

• If you are having a tough time finding enough money for food, rent, and other costs

• If you recently moved to Canada and need support connecting to resources

• If you’re a service provider and looking for resources for a client

#377” -City of Edmonton Only –

Non Emergency Police Dispatch” – Edmonton Police are trying to reduce the volume of 911 calls to allow true emergency calls to go through unimpeded. With High call volume 911 may be forced to put you on hold, to some during an emergency this could be fatal. To reduce the risk of fatal non connection with 911 the Alberta Government and the Edmonton City Police “EPS” created #377 to handle all Non-Life Threatening Calls that require police services.

#377 in Edmonton Handles:

– Thefts / Mischief

– Assaults

– Break and Enters into homes/businesses

– Child Abuse/Welfare concerns

– Disturbances/Noise complaints

– Missing Persons

– Sexual Assaults

– Property damage collisions where vehicles are not drivable

– Neighbor disputes

– Family disputes

– Frauds over $5,000.00

– Suspicious persons/vehicles

– Weapons/Gun complaints

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd

#FirstAidCourseEdmonton #FirstAidAndBasicLifeSupport #BasicLifeSupport #BLS #BLSforHCP #BCLS #BCLSCourseEdmonton #ACLS #AdvancedCardiovascularLifeSupport #MFR #EmergencyMedicalResponder #ITLS

Concussion “Mild Traumatic Brain Injury” & Your Child

Concussion “Mild Traumatic Brain Injury” & your Child

What is a Concussion/Mild Traumatic Brain Injury?

A concussion, also called a mild traumatic brain injury, is a head injury caused by the brain being shaken around inside the skull after a direct blow to the head, or a sudden jerking of the head or neck when the body is hit. Your child does not have to pass out “lose consciousness” to have a concussion. Some children will have symptoms of a concussion, such as passing out or forgetting what happened right before the injury, but others won’t.

Common Causes:

  • Falls
  • Sports injuries “Impact
  • Physical Assault “Shaken Baby Syndrome
  • Motor Vehicle Collision

When should my child go to the hospital?

There is more risk of complications such as bleeding and / or swelling in the brain in the first 24 to 48 hours after the injury. However, complications can happen even weeks later.

  • Call 911 or Go to the Hospital immediately if:
  • Becomes less alert, won’t wake up, or is hard to wake up
  • Doesn’t want to eat or nurse
  • Loses a learned skill “for example: Toilet Training”
  • Cry becomes high-pitched or the cry changes
  • Is acting differently
  • Is cranky or fussy
  • Blood or fluid coming from the nose or ears, or bruising around the eyes or ears
  • Has or acts like he or she has a headache
  • Speech is slurred or has trouble speaking
  • Loss of vision, blurry vision, or double vision
  • Sudden weakness on one side of the body
  • More than 2 episodes of uncontrollable or forceful vomiting that won’t stop
  • Seizure activity “such as abnormal movements, loss of consciousness, convulsions or gazing distantly off without being able to be stimulated or respond”

What to Expect After the Injury:

– The First 48 Hours – Make sure someone stays with your child for the first 24 hours after the concussion.

Rest & Sleep

Try to get your child to rest for the first 24 hours, it’s one of the best ways to help the brain heal. “It’s OK to let your child sleep

You “Do Not” have to wake up your child every 2 to 3 hours in the first 24 hours. If the doctor has asked that you “Do wake them” your child should wake up easily and not show any of the warning sings previously listed.

Limit “visual stimulus”, reading, television, video games, etc within the first 48 hours. The brain “needs to rest” so that it can heal, extra stimulus may make the symptoms worse. It may also be advisable for your child to take time off from school.

Keep your child away from bright lights, loud noises or crowds for the first 48 hours, as these can make symptoms worse as well.

Diet:

After a concussion, start your child on clear fluids such as “water, apple juice, ginger ale” and slowly go back to a normal diet. The fluids will help replenish needed sugar levels and help stimulate brain function, as vomiting is common in the first 24 hours fluids help keep your child hydrated and make vomiting easier.

Managing Pain:

To manage the pain “Headache”, you can help your child take “acetaminophen “such as Tylenol” for pain, use the proper dosage for the age / size of your child ‘Directions will be on the back of the bottle” Talk to your doctor about using products with ASA or NSAID’s in them “such as Aspirin, Ibuprofen, Advil or Motrin” these medications can increase the risk of bleeding.

  • – The First 4 Weeks – The symptoms below are common after a mild brain injury. They usually get better on their own within a few weeks and should not last longer than a month.

Feeling tired “abnormal to the casualty”

Problems falling or staying asleep

Feeling confused, poor concentration, or slow to answer questions

Feeling dizzy, poor balance, or poor coordination

Being sensitive to light

Being sensitive to sounds

Ringing in the ears

A mild headache, sometimes with nausea and/or vomiting

Being irritable, having mood swings, or feeling somewhat sad or “down”

While your Childs Brain is Healing

Most children recover from the concussion. The symptoms can take days to weeks to go away. Your child should start to feel better within a few days and be back to normal within about 4 weeks.

If your child isn’t feeling better within a few days after the injury “See your Doctor”

Expect your child to feel tired as he or she becomes more active. Make sure your child rests as needed.

If you find your child’s cranky or has mood swings, “see your Doctor if your worried”

Some children may find it hard to concentrate while their brain is healing, so make sure your child goes back to their normal activities slowly. Go back to school for half days at first, and increase as tolerated.

Ask your doctor when its okay for your child to play sports again. “The brain needs time to heal”

If your child plays sports, make sure the coach/instructor/team-mates know about your child’s concussion. “Avoid further head injuries”

  • “Use medicine as prescribed” See your doctor if your child still needs pain medicine for a headache longer than 2 weeks after the injury.

If your child’s Symptoms get worse at any time or you notice new symptoms from the list above, or from the first segment, call your doctor or Health Link “811 in Alberta”. You can also call the “Health Link Alberta 24/7 if you have questions about concussion/mild traumatic brain injury or any of the information in this handout.

This information was taken From Alberta Health Services “Concussion (Mild Traumatic Brain Injury) Information slip.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd

#FirstAidCourseEdmonton #FirstAidAndBasicLifeSupport #BasicLifeSupport #BLS #BLSforHCP #BCLS #BCLSCourseEdmonton #ACLS #AdvancedCardiovascularLifeSupport #MFR #EmergencyMedicalResponder #ITLS #Concussion #HeadInjury #ChildhoodHeadTrauma

ACLS “AKA” Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support for HCP’s

ACLS “AKA” Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support for HCP’s

One of the new programs now being offered at Saving Grace Medical Academy is the ACLS Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support course taught through the Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation. One of the highest level’s of resuscitation available, ACLS Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support focuses on the systematic approach on high quality advanced emergency medical techniques. This program has been selected by Alberta Health Services as the standard for all “Advanced” medical professionals entering the emergency medical field.

This course offers a video-based and instructor led advanced course that expands on the Basic Life Support or “BLS” cpr skills for health care providers. Stressing the importance of continuous, high quality CPR, ACLS takes the Basic Life Support Training to the next level and brings out the importance of medical intervention during cardiopulmonary arrest along with immediate post cardiac arrest, dysrhythmia, coronary syndromes as well as stroke’s.

Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation’s ACLS course presents:

  • -Improved resuscitation science leading to a better patient outcome
  • -Simulations and scenarios based on realism
  • -Instructor’s with experience that can help adapt the program to local protocol’s.

Who can take this class?

– ACLS Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support is designed for advanced health care professionals who either direct or participate in management of cardiopulmonary arrest and other cardiovascular emergencies.

– EMS Emergency Medical Service Professionals, EMT’s / Paramedics.

– Emergency Medicine Professionals – Nurses / RN’s / LPN’s / Respiratory Therapists RT’s

– Intensive Care specialists – Doctor’s

– Critical Care Units

– Any employment that requires an “Advanced Medical Directives” such as physicians, nurses or paramedics.

“The Heart & Stroke Foundation recommends that only those who will use the skills of ACLS within their scope of practice take the ACLS course. All students who meet the prerequisites and successfully pass the ACLS course will receive a course completion card attached to your “HSF ID number”.

Course Content:

Recent scientific evidence has pointed a direction towards better content, while educational research has been led to improve design of the ACLS Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support Provider course. The ACLS course emphasizes 3 major concepts.

1) Crucial importance of High Quality CPR cardiopulmonary Resucitation

2) Integration of BLS Basic Life Support with ACLS interventions

3) Team Interaction and communication during resuscitation.

Students will practice the application of many skills in simulated cases and will practice both Team Leader and team member roles while practicing:

  • – High Quality BLS Basic Life Support CPR for HCP’s
  • – Airway management
  • – Systematic approach to scenario management
  • – Rhythm recognition “ECG”
  • – Defibrillation “AED Manual & Automatic”
  • – IV intravenous / IO intraosseous techniques
  • – Medication assist or admin
  • – Cardioversion
  • – Team Dynamics
  • – Trans cutaneous Pacing

Course Duration:

-New Students – 12 Hours (+-) 20 Minutes broken up into a 2 day 6 hour each program.

-Renewing Students – 6 Hours (+-) 35 minutes – Completed in a 1 day program.

“To qualify for a renewal you must complete the renewal program BEFORE your certificate expires” ACLS certification lasts for 2 years.

Here at Saving Grace Medical we hope that all this information helps you achieve a higher level of education and get the course you need when you need it. We look forward to hearing from you and helping you achieve the career you desire.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd

#FirstAidCourseEdmonton #FirstAidAndBasicLifeSupport #BasicLifeSupport #BLS #BLSforHCP #BCLS #BCLSCourseEdmonton #ACLS #AdvancedCardiovascularLifeSupport #MFR #EmergencyMedicalResponder #ITLS

Croup

Croup

Croup is a very common illness that affects children and has the potential to be mild in symptoms or even dangerous to life threatening if it goes untreated. Children from the ages of 6 months to 3 years have a chance of contracting “Croup” on average once or twice and can be linked to other “respiratory illness“. It is always a good measure for Parents and Guardians to take “allrespiratory illness” as serious and seek further medical advice, “We need to breath to live

Croup is an infection that causes swelling of the voice box “larynx” and windpipe “trachea“, making the airway just below the vocal cords inflamed, swollen and narrow. This makes breathing both noisy and difficult. There are two main types of Croup and as such must be seen as “Infectious

Different Types of Croup

Viral Croup – This is the most common type of Croup and is the result of viral infection in the voice box or airway, Temperatures range from low fever to 39C/104F. Often Viral Croup will start with a cold that slowly turns into a “Barking Cough“. The child’s voice will become hoarse with noisy breathing “Stridor“.

“Stridor” is the coarse musical sound that comes with breathing through an inflamed-swollen airway. The danger of “Croup with Stridor sounds” is that the airway is continuing to swell. If this happens it may reach a point when your child cannot breath at all. “Stridor” should always be assessed by a physician to prevent the danger of a closed airway. Stridor is common with mild Croup and increases with activity or crying, however if Stridor persists while the child is resting, it can be a sign of severe Croup and you must seek medical aid. Stridor may also be a sign of a serous breathing problem such as Epiglottitis.

– Spasmodic Croup – This form of Croup is caused by a mild upper respiratory infection or even an “Allergy” normally no fever is present. This is the scariest form of Croup as it has a “sudden” onset and often presents in the middle of the night. The child will go to bed with mild “Cold” like symptoms then wake up gasping for breath with hoarse beathing, a barking cough and “stridor”. As the child’s effort to breath increases their energy levels will decrease, they may even stop eating or drinking and eventually become “too tired to cough”, if this is the case “seek medical attention immediately”

Treatments

“Always consult a medical professional before treating illness on your own, home made remedies may not have the desired effect and may make the illness-symptoms worse”

  • -If your child wakes up in the middle of the night with Croup, take them into the bathroom, close the door, then turn on the shower on the hottest setting “Do not put them in the shower“. The “Steam” from the shower over 15-20 minutes will help ease the symptoms as you sit in the bathroom with the child. “The child will still have the barking cough though“,
  • -For the rest of the night “and 2 to 3 nights after“, try to a “cold” water vaporizer or humidifier in your child’s room. Your child may have another attack of Croup even within the same night, if they do repeat the shower steam treatment. Steam almost always works, if it does not, try fresh night air and open up the window of their room “wide”. If the child still persists with coarse hoarse breaths and Strider contact your local Medical Professional.

“In Alberta Canada you can contact “811” to contact the Alberta Health Link, a Registered Nurse or Paramedic will help you with treatments and options, they may also refer to you to bring the child into a Hospital for treatment.”

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd

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Animal Bites

Animal Bites

Each region of the world has its own unique form of predator and prey animals. For this portion lets focus on some basic animal types that you can find in many regions of the world. “Remembernever assume an animal you randomly encounter is tame, animals within parks are wild and should be treated as such. Your personal safety and safety of others around you is the most important thing when dealing with wild animals or animals that attack humans. Be safe, be aware, be loud, many animal attacks in the wild occur due to a startled animal that is unaware of your presence.

Common Predatory animal types that you may encounter:

1) K9, Dog, Wolf, Fox, Coyote

2) Feline, Cat, Puma, Linx, Bob-Cat, Cougar

3) Bear, Brown, Black, Kodiak, Grizzly

4) Snake

5) Marine Life

What to watch for:

  • Predator Type “Land” :Normally Carnivores / Omnivores – Posturing, growing, swiping at the ground, hissing or following you just out of sight or within a wooded area, these universal signs are of a predatory animal that is either intimidated by your presence, or is stalking you to determine if you are food.
  • Prey Type “Land“: Normally Herbivores – Hoof stamping, posturing, raised back with hissing, snorting, spitting or loud calls, may charge with head down. These universal signs are of a prey animal that is attempting to defend itself or its young.

Prevention:

When you are in a wooded, grassy or abandoned area:

  • – Be loud, clapping of hands, talking loudly will help other animals know you are in the vicinity.
  • – Be seen, wear brightly colored clothing that is easy to spot.
  • – Be aware, consult your local fish and wildlife association before going into an unfamiliar wooded area, knowing the dangers can help you avoid them.
  • – Don’t keep food on you while in wooded areas or camping, keep all food stores in a locked box away from your camp site in case predators are attracted.
  • – If you have pets that go outdoors, be aware that smaller pets can be seen as food for larger predatory animals and may be taken. Keep an eye on your pets and be aware of the local Predators within your region
  • – Never approach an unfamiliar animal
  • – Animals in parks are not tame
  • – Animals with collars are “Tagged” for research purposes and should be avoided as they me be a nuisance animal that has been tagged so that they may be removed from populated area’s.
  • – The animal may seem calm, but keep your distance, getting to close may make the animal react to defend itself.

Stings from Marine Life:

“Know the water you are swimming in and stay away from stinging marine life”

Watch for – Pain, Rash, Redness, Swelling

How to help: While wearing gloves, remove any tentacles or pieces of the animal. Wash the area with vinegar for at least 30 seconds, if vinegar isn’t available use a mixture of baking soda and water “Make the consistency like toothpaste” and leave it on the area for 20 minutes. Then immerse the affected are in “hot” water “as hot as patient can tolerate” for 20 minutes or as long as the pain persists. ‘Do not Rub the area“. Scrape or shave the are with a razor or the edge of a knife, put a cold pack on the area for the first hour to reduce the pain “Seek Medical Attention” to verify that the bite / sting was non toxic.

Snakebites:

“Do not aggravate a snake, if out hiking watch where you are stepping, wear proper footwear when hiking”

  • Watch for – Intense Pain, Burning, red raised tender skin that blanches at the puncture site, liquid seeping from the wound.

How to help: Keep the injured site still and lower than the heart if possible. “Seek Medical Attention Immediately” by calling 911, if you have a physical description of the snake, report it to EMS personnel because it may help them provide the best treatment. Check the temperature and color of the limb beyond the site of the bite and note if it is abnormally cold or warm compared to the other limb. Report this to EMS personnel.

MYTH BUST:

  • NEVER – Apply ice, cut the wound “blood letting”, apply suction “Sucking it out”, apply a tourniquet to a snake bite. These myths will make the injury worse and can cause serious harm.
  • NEVER – Urinate on a wound, this may cause more pain and lead to further infection with psychological trauma.

How to help with animal Bites:

1) Check the area, once the area is safe, Check the person and ensure the persons ABC’s are present “Airway / Breathing / Circulation REMEMBERWear gloves if available to avoid bodily fluids or venom.

2) Call 911 and get an AED if you are alone, you suspect a Head / Neck or Spine injury, there is a motor vehicle collision, the person is allergic or the injured persons life could be at risk. “911 will link you to the Animal Control Center if you do not have the number.”

3) Care for the animal Bite by:

Always follow recommendations by your Emergency Response professionals and 911 Dispatch personnel. “Never endanger yourself or the victim, you may “not” need to move or roll the injured person”

  • – If there are other life threatening injuries, treat those first as quickly as possible with as little movement to the injured person.

a) Try to get the person safely away from the animal without injuring yourself. Make loud noises and get other people to help if available “Strength in numbers”

b) Never try to “Capture the animal” this may endanger yourself

c) If the wound is minor, wash it with soap and water, control any bleeding and put a dressing on the wound. Watch for signs of infection.

d) Seek medical aid, all animal bites and stings should be checked by a physician to ensure no infection is present and that the patients psychological well being is maintained. Being attacked by a wild animal can be traumatic.

While you wait for an Ambulance:

RECOVERY Position:

1) Kneel Beside the victim and place the victims furthest arm from you above their head.

2) Place the arm closest to you across the victims chest as a protector arm.

3) The Key is in their Knee, bend the nearest leg up at the knee.

4) Carefully slip your hand under the hollow of the victims neck to support the Head Neck & Spine, at the same time use your forearm by slipping it carefully under the shoulder for leverage.

5) Place your free hand on the Key Knee and gently roll the victim away from you by applying steady pressure against the knee and shoulder at the same time. The victims head should rest on their raised arm.

6) To secure the position pull the key knee further up and bring their protector arm out to use the elbow to stabilize the position.

7) Check the Airway to make sure their still breathing.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd

#FirstAidCourseEdmonton #FirstAidAndBasicLifeSupport #BasicLifeSupport #BLS #BLSforHCP #BCLS #BCLSCourseEdmonton #ACLS #AdvancedCardiovascularLifeSupport #MFR #EmergencyMedicalResponder #ITLS #AnimalAttack #AnimalBite

Insect Stings & Bites

Insect Stings & Bites

Each region of the world has its own unique form of plants, animals and insects. For this portion lets focus on some basic insects that you can find in many regions of North America. “Remember” insects travel as weather changes in temperature, many new species of insects both toxic or otherwise may be in your region where they previously were not. Its always a good course of action to know what to look for.

Common insects types that may be harmful or fatal:

1) (Spider) Black Widow, Brown Recluse

2) Scorpions

3) Tick’s

4) Bee’s, Wasps, Yellow Jackets, Hornets

5) Caterpillars

What to watch for:

Many toxic species of insect come with a natural warning sign, bright colors, smells, or even posturing can be a significant sign from the insect to “STAY BACK“, its a good idea to keep yourself and your children up to date on local insects in case they do encounter them.

Prevention:

When you are in a wooded, grassy or abandoned area:

  • – Wear a long sleeved shirt and long pants
  • – Tuck your pant legs into your socks or boots and tuck your shirt into your pants. In areas with ticks, use a rubber band or tape the area where your pants meet your socks so that nothing can get underneath.
  • – wear light colored clothing to make it easier to see tiny insects or ticks.
  • – Avoid perfume as it may attract certain insects
  • – stay away from “underbrush” decomposed wood, wood piles or tall grass
  • – Check yourself carefully for insects or ticks after you get inside.
  • – If you have pets that go outdoors, spray them with repellent made for your type of pet. Check them for ticks and insects often because your pet can bring these into your home.
  • – If your allergic keep an “EpiPen” with you while outdoors.

If bitten What to look for:

– Pain, redness, or swelling at the site of the injury

– Insects at the site or nearby

– Intense burning, itching or color change of the skin with a puncture mark.

– The insect is lodged within your tissue “Tick / Leach

– Archery Target or “Bulls-eye” mark on your skin “Tick Bite

– The stinger is lodged within your tissue “Bee’s

– Allergic reaction

How to help with Insect Bites:

1) Check the area, once the area is safe, Check the person and ensure the persons ABC’s are present “Airway / Breathing / CirculationREMEMBERWear gloves if available to avoid bodily fluids or from being bitten.

2) Call 911 and get an AED if you are alone, you suspect a Head / Neck or Spine injury, there is a motor vehicle collision, the person is allergic or the injured persons life could be at risk. “911 will link you to the Animal Control Center if you do not have the number.

3) Care for the Insect Bite by:

Always follow recommendations by your Emergency Response professionals and 911 Dispatch personnel. “Never endanger yourself or the victim, you may “not” need to move or roll the injured person”

– If there are other life threatening injuries, treat those first as quickly as possible with as little movement to the injured person.

a) STINGER EMBEDDED

– Using a hard thin smooth object “Credit Card

– Holding the skin taught scrape towards the stinger using the card “light even pressure” until the stinger comes free.

– Watch for signs of allergic reaction

– Wash with soap and water and seek medical attention if the person feels ill, light headed, or the swelling begins to spread.

b) TICK BITES

– If the tick hasn’t started to dig into the flesh, remove it by brushing it off the skin.

– If the tick has started to dig into the flesh, grasp the head of the tick with tweezers and pull it out gently not to crush the tick.

– If a rash or flu-like symptoms appear within a month after the tick bite, seek medical attention. “Lyme Disease” is a common disease for Tick’s to be infected with.

– Watch for signs of allergic reaction

– Wash with soap and water and seek medical attention if the person feels ill, light headed, or the swelling begins to spread.

c) SPIDER / SCORPION BITES

– If you are bitten, attempt to photograph the spider using your cell phone, or “Don’t endanger yourself” place the specimen in a sealed container. Doctors may need to double check to see if its toxic.

– If the wound begins to burn, raise up and spread there may be a toxic exposure.

RECOVERY Position:

  • 1) Kneel Beside the victim and place the victims furthest arm from you above their head.
  • 2) Place the arm closest to you across the victims chest as a protector arm.
  • 3) The Key is in their Knee, bend the nearest leg up at the knee.
  • 4) Carefully slip your hand under the hollow of the victims neck to support the Head Neck & Spine, at the same time use your forearm by slipping it carefully under the shoulder for leverage.
  • 5) Place your free hand on the Key Knee and gently roll the victim away from you by applying steady pressure against the knee and shoulder at the same time. The victims head should rest on their raised arm.
  • 6) To secure the position pull the key knee further up and bring their protector arm out to use the elbow to stabilize the position.
  • 7) Check the Airway to make sure their still breathing.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd

#FirstAidCourseEdmonton #FirstAidAndBasicLifeSupport #BasicLifeSupport #BLS #BLSforHCP #BCLS #BCLSCourseEdmonton #ACLS #AdvancedCardiovascularLifeSupport #MFR #EmergencyMedicalResponder #ITLS #InsectBitesStings #BlackWidowAlberta #BrownRecluseAlberta

Poison’s & How to Help:

Poison’s & how to help:

There are many substances that we have in our environment that can be natural or even man made, many of these can be toxic or cause harsh chemical reactions to our bodies. Poisons are substances that have a harmful effect within the body if it is inhaled, swallowed, absorbed, or injected. Poisons are immediately life-threatening if they affect breathing or circulation. “When you treat someone who has been poisoned, you should take precautions to make sure that you do not come into contact with the poison yourself.

4 Routs of Exposure:

1) Injected – Enters the body through bites, stings or needles

2) Inhaled – Enters the body through the lungs “breathed in”

3) Ingested – Swallowed or contacts the lips & mouth

4) Absorbed – Enters through the skin from exposure

What it looks like:

  • 1) Injected – Puncture wound, problems breathing, pain, prescription medication or illegal drugs nearby, redness and swelling at the entry point.
  • 2) Inhaled – Breathing difficulties, irritated eye, nose or throat, vomiting, dizziness, seizures, bluish color around the mouth, unconsciousness, and unusual smell in the air, a cloud or plume in the air.
  • 3) Ingested – An open container of poison nearby, burns around the mouth, increased production of saliva and/or saliva that is an abnormal color, Abnormal cramps and vomiting, seizures, dizziness and or drowsiness, unconsciousness, a burning sensation in the mouth, throat or stomach, diarrhea.
  • 4) Absorbed – Rash, burning, itching, swelling blisters, hives “raised itchy area of skin”, burns, unconsciousness.

Prevention:

  • – Keep all medications, vitamins, household cleaners, hygiene products, decorative plants and other toxic substances well out of reach of children. “Duel Tab Child Locks are recommended”
  • – Use child-resistant safety caps on medications and other potentially toxic products.
  • – Treat all household, cosmetic or drugstore products as if they could be dangerous.
  • – Teach children to check with an adult before eating an unknown substance.
  • Never call medicine “Candy or juice” to persuade a child to take it.
  • – Keep products in their “original” Containers with their original labels.
  • – Use poison symbols to identify dangerous substances and teach children what the symbols mean.
  • – All medicine bottles and boxes should be carefully labelled. Read the label three times when you are taking or giving medications.1) When you take the medication from the cupboard or refrigerator, 2) when you take the medication out of the package, 3) just before you assist the patient taking the medication.
  • – “Always follow your local legislation on Medication Administration” before you give any medication.
  • – Prescription medicine should be taken only by the person whom it was prescribed too, “never self medicate
  • – Carefully dispose of outdated medication by giving them to your pharmacist “Never flush down the toilet or throw in the garbage
  • – Wear proper protective clothing any time you may come into contact with a poisonous substance.
  • – Many cleaning products have toxic fumes, read the labels and use in a well ventilated area. “Always follow the manufacturers recommendations to avoid damage or injury.
  • – Mixing certain household cleaning products, such as “Bleach and ammonia or household cleaners, can create toxic fumes that may be fatal if inhaled or exposed.”

WHMIS or GHS “Workplace Hazardous Material Information System or Global Harmonization System”

  • – Always refer to your MSDS “Material Safety Data Sheet” before you use a new chemical, cosmetic or pharmaceutical.
  • – The MSDS will provide you with all “Who’s, Whats, Where’s, When’s, Why’s & How’s” of the chemical you are working with to avoid exposure or potentially harmful effects.
  • – Check all warning labels before use and replace warning labels that are damaged or unreadable.

“For more information on taking the WHMIS or GHS course please consult your local First Aid and Safety school for course listings, WHMIS or GHS is now available for Online certification and you may not need to “attend” and in class portion.”

How to help with Poisoning:

1) Check the area, once the area is safe, Check the person and ensure the persons ABC’s are present “Airway / Breathing / Circulation REMEMBERWear gloves if available to avoid bodily fluids or exposure to the chemical. A particle mask or SCBA “Self Contained Breathing Apparatus” may be needed to avoid inhaling chemicals in the air “Never run into a dangerous area where you suspect poisonous gas, wait for the rescue teams who are trained to do so“.

2) Call 911 and get an AED if you are alone, you suspect a Head / Neck or Spine injury, there is a motor vehicle collision, you suspect toxic gas, dangerous environment or the injured persons life could be at risk. “911 will link you to the Poison Control Center if you do not have the number.

3) Care for the Poisoned casualty by:

Always follow recommendations by your Emergency Response professionals and 911 Dispatch personnel. “Never endanger yourself or the victim, you may “not” need to move or roll the injured person”

  • – If there are other life threatening injuries, treat those first as quickly as possible with as little movement to the injured person.

a) Determine the type of exposure the person is experiencing “Injected, Inhaled, Absorbed or Ingested”

b) “Inhaled” Get the Person into fresh air, but “DO NOT” enter into ta hazardous atmosphere yourself to do so. Refer to the MSDS if available about treatments, listen to your 911 dispatcher for further treatments.

c) “Swallowed” Check the packaging of the poison if available and refer back to the MSDS if available about treatments, listen to your 911 dispatcher for further treatments.

d) “Absorbed” Check the packaging of the poison if available and refer back to the MSDS if available about treatments, listen to your 911 dispatcher for further treatments. – Flush the skin with cool running water for 15 minutes to “Dilute, remove and reduce the chemical reaction.

e) “Injected” Check the packaging of the poison if available and refer back to the MSDS if available about treatments, listen to your 911 dispatcher for further treatments. – keep the puncture site lower than the heart if possible, have the person rest comfortably, “NEVER” suck out the poison seek medical aid.

RECOVERY Position:

1) Kneel Beside the victim and place the victims furthest arm from you above their head.

2) Place the arm closest to you across the victims chest as a protector arm.

3) The Key is in their Knee, bend the nearest leg up at the knee.

4) Carefully slip your hand under the hollow of the victims neck to support the Head Neck & Spine, at the same time use your forearm by slipping it carefully under the shoulder for leverage.

5) Place your free hand on the Key Knee and gently roll the victim away from you by applying steady pressure against the knee and shoulder at the same time. The victims head should rest on their raised arm.

6) To secure the position pull the key knee further up and bring their protector arm out to use the elbow to stabilize the position.

7) Check the Airway to make sure their still breathing.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd

#FirstAidCourseEdmonton #FirstAidAndBasicLifeSupport #BasicLifeSupport #BLS #BLSforHCP #BCLS #BCLSCourseEdmonton #ACLS #AdvancedCardiovascularLifeSupport #MFR #EmergencyMedicalResponder #ITLS #ChemicalExposure #MSDS #SDS #GHS #WHMIS #Poisons #Poisoning

Environmental Emergencies – Part 3 “Heat Exposure”

Environmental Emergencies – Part 3 “Heat Exposure”

Following our previous posts about Environmental Emergencies we will now go into “Heat Related Emergencies” and how they can go from bad to worse in only a short period of time.

Just remember that Thermal energy in either direction Hot or Cold will result in levels of severity and symptoms that are very similar but on opposite ends of the spectrum “Fire / Ice“, Lets focus on Heat exposure within the core of your body for this article and explain how a High core temperature can effect treatments .

To help with the explanation of Hyperthermia we must also bring in your “Normal Body Temperature 37C / 98.6F“. “Hyper” literally means “High” and “thermia” temperature, put them together and you get high temperature within your body. Your body has three stages of Hyperthermia “Heat Cramps / Heat Exhaustion & Heat Stroke” and each stage has its own symptoms until you reach about “41C or 106F” which would typically be unconsciousness.

Heat Exposure & What it looks like:

1) Heat Cramps -“37C to 38C” -Mild muscle contractions that can become severe, usually in the legs and abdomen but can be in other body parts, moist skin.

2) Heat Exhaustion38C to 40C – Raised Body temperature, moist skin, skin that is redder or paler than normal, nausea, dizziness, weakness, exhaustion, head aches and feeling ill. “Most people think this stage is Heat Stroke or Sun Stroke”

3) Heat Stroke39C to 41C – High body temperature, Red, Hot, Dry skin “no longer sweating”, irritable, bizarre, or aggressive behavior, rapid, weak pulse becoming irregular, Rapid, shallow breathing, seizures & progressive loss of consciousness.

Causes:

  • – Exposure to hot temperatures for too long.

Prevention of Hyperthermia:

“High body temperature”

  • – Drink plenty of cool fluids – This is the most important action you can take to prevent heat related emergencies “Not Energy Drinks”
  • – Avoid being outdoors during the hottest part of the day “around 3 pm”
  • – Slow down your activities as it gets hotter and don’t work or exercise for too long at a time.
  • – Take frequent breaks in a cool or shaded area to let your body cool off. This will help you cope better with short periods of extreme heat.
  • – Dress for the heat and for your activity level.
  • – Wear a hat when you’re in the sun. Wear light colored cotton clothing to absorb sweat and let air circulate and heat escape.
  • – Avoid caffeine and alcohol because they can cause dehydration, which stops your body from controlling its temperature properly.

How to Treat Hyperthermia: “High body temperature”

1) Check the area, once the area is safe, Check the person and ensure the persons ABC’s are present “Airway / Breathing / CirculationREMEMBERWear gloves if available to avoid bodily fluids.

2) Call 911 and get an AED if the heat related injury includes seizures, altered personality, vomiting, unconsciousness or possible heat stroke, or EMS may be delayed.

3) Care for the Heat Exposure by:

Always follow recommendations by your Emergency Response professionals and 911 Dispatch personnel. “Never endanger yourself, you may not need to move the person”

a) If the patient is conscious and able to drink water, have them sip some cool water or electrolyte drinks. “Not energy Drinks

-b) If the patient is conscious have them then rest in a cool place

-c) Have the person loosen any tight clothing and if you are fanning remove any clothing that is soaked with sweat.

-d) Cool the person by putting cool water on the skin and fanning them to increase evaporation.

-e) If you suspect Heat Stroke remember “Hot is Fast / Cold is Slow” If cool water bottles, ice packs, or other cold sources are available put them in each armpit, the groin and the back of the neck. Cool the body any way you can, immerse the body in cool “not cold” water from the neck down. Or you can sponge the entire body with tepid or cool water or fan the person. “Cold water may put the person into shock

-f) If the person is alert, give him or her cool liquids to drink “No alcohol or caffeine”

-g) Continue care until EMS arrive or you seek further medical attention.

NOTES TO REMEMBER:

  • – Heat related emergencies will get worse without treatment and can change from one level to another very quickly. Never let someone with heat exhaustion or heat stroke “go to bed” without treatment.
  • Febrile Seizure – A febrile seizure occurs when infants and children experience a rapid increase in temperature “Usually up to 40C or higher“. Infants with an “Armpit” temperature of 38C or higher and children with 40C and higher are in “Immediate danger!Call 911 and seek medical attention immediately!
  • – If the person is having a seizure, and has a fever, call 911, keep the person in a safe position, and cool them down any way possible. The seizure often will stop spontaneously within 15 minutes or when the person is cooled down. “Always seek medical attention to rule out further damage”

As you can see, the treatment for heat Exposure in this tutorial is the same regardless of the name “Heat cramps / heat exhaustion or heat stroke“. Once you master the First Aid technique on how to aid a Thermal injury caused from a Heat source you can aid anyone who has been exposed to too much Heat energy. Just remember that it does not matter what the name of the Heat exposure injury is, the treatments are often the same “Hot is Fast & Cold is Slow“. You can help by remembering to “Treat the heat, with cool running water for 10-20 minutes, place cool packs in the armpits, groin and back of the neck, and if the patient is conscious have them sip cool water or electrolyte drinks..

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd

#FirstAidCourseEdmonton #FirstAidAndBasicLifeSupport #BasicLifeSupport #BLS #BLSforHCP #BCLS #BCLSCourseEdmonton #ACLS #AdvancedCardiovascularLifeSupport #MFR #EmergencyMedicalResponder #ITLS #HeatStroke #HeatCramps #HeatExhaustion #SunExposure #HeatExposure