Tag Archives: Emergency First Aid Course

Poison’s & How to Help:

Poison’s & how to help:

There are many substances that we have in our environment that can be natural or even man made, many of these can be toxic or cause harsh chemical reactions to our bodies. Poisons are substances that have a harmful effect within the body if it is inhaled, swallowed, absorbed, or injected. Poisons are immediately life-threatening if they affect breathing or circulation. “When you treat someone who has been poisoned, you should take precautions to make sure that you do not come into contact with the poison yourself.

4 Routs of Exposure:

1) Injected – Enters the body through bites, stings or needles

2) Inhaled – Enters the body through the lungs “breathed in”

3) Ingested – Swallowed or contacts the lips & mouth

4) Absorbed – Enters through the skin from exposure

What it looks like:

  • 1) Injected – Puncture wound, problems breathing, pain, prescription medication or illegal drugs nearby, redness and swelling at the entry point.
  • 2) Inhaled – Breathing difficulties, irritated eye, nose or throat, vomiting, dizziness, seizures, bluish color around the mouth, unconsciousness, and unusual smell in the air, a cloud or plume in the air.
  • 3) Ingested – An open container of poison nearby, burns around the mouth, increased production of saliva and/or saliva that is an abnormal color, Abnormal cramps and vomiting, seizures, dizziness and or drowsiness, unconsciousness, a burning sensation in the mouth, throat or stomach, diarrhea.
  • 4) Absorbed – Rash, burning, itching, swelling blisters, hives “raised itchy area of skin”, burns, unconsciousness.

Prevention:

  • – Keep all medications, vitamins, household cleaners, hygiene products, decorative plants and other toxic substances well out of reach of children. “Duel Tab Child Locks are recommended”
  • – Use child-resistant safety caps on medications and other potentially toxic products.
  • – Treat all household, cosmetic or drugstore products as if they could be dangerous.
  • – Teach children to check with an adult before eating an unknown substance.
  • Never call medicine “Candy or juice” to persuade a child to take it.
  • – Keep products in their “original” Containers with their original labels.
  • – Use poison symbols to identify dangerous substances and teach children what the symbols mean.
  • – All medicine bottles and boxes should be carefully labelled. Read the label three times when you are taking or giving medications.1) When you take the medication from the cupboard or refrigerator, 2) when you take the medication out of the package, 3) just before you assist the patient taking the medication.
  • – “Always follow your local legislation on Medication Administration” before you give any medication.
  • – Prescription medicine should be taken only by the person whom it was prescribed too, “never self medicate
  • – Carefully dispose of outdated medication by giving them to your pharmacist “Never flush down the toilet or throw in the garbage
  • – Wear proper protective clothing any time you may come into contact with a poisonous substance.
  • – Many cleaning products have toxic fumes, read the labels and use in a well ventilated area. “Always follow the manufacturers recommendations to avoid damage or injury.
  • – Mixing certain household cleaning products, such as “Bleach and ammonia or household cleaners, can create toxic fumes that may be fatal if inhaled or exposed.”

WHMIS or GHS “Workplace Hazardous Material Information System or Global Harmonization System”

  • – Always refer to your MSDS “Material Safety Data Sheet” before you use a new chemical, cosmetic or pharmaceutical.
  • – The MSDS will provide you with all “Who’s, Whats, Where’s, When’s, Why’s & How’s” of the chemical you are working with to avoid exposure or potentially harmful effects.
  • – Check all warning labels before use and replace warning labels that are damaged or unreadable.

“For more information on taking the WHMIS or GHS course please consult your local First Aid and Safety school for course listings, WHMIS or GHS is now available for Online certification and you may not need to “attend” and in class portion.”

How to help with Poisoning:

1) Check the area, once the area is safe, Check the person and ensure the persons ABC’s are present “Airway / Breathing / Circulation REMEMBERWear gloves if available to avoid bodily fluids or exposure to the chemical. A particle mask or SCBA “Self Contained Breathing Apparatus” may be needed to avoid inhaling chemicals in the air “Never run into a dangerous area where you suspect poisonous gas, wait for the rescue teams who are trained to do so“.

2) Call 911 and get an AED if you are alone, you suspect a Head / Neck or Spine injury, there is a motor vehicle collision, you suspect toxic gas, dangerous environment or the injured persons life could be at risk. “911 will link you to the Poison Control Center if you do not have the number.

3) Care for the Poisoned casualty by:

Always follow recommendations by your Emergency Response professionals and 911 Dispatch personnel. “Never endanger yourself or the victim, you may “not” need to move or roll the injured person”

  • – If there are other life threatening injuries, treat those first as quickly as possible with as little movement to the injured person.

a) Determine the type of exposure the person is experiencing “Injected, Inhaled, Absorbed or Ingested”

b) “Inhaled” Get the Person into fresh air, but “DO NOT” enter into ta hazardous atmosphere yourself to do so. Refer to the MSDS if available about treatments, listen to your 911 dispatcher for further treatments.

c) “Swallowed” Check the packaging of the poison if available and refer back to the MSDS if available about treatments, listen to your 911 dispatcher for further treatments.

d) “Absorbed” Check the packaging of the poison if available and refer back to the MSDS if available about treatments, listen to your 911 dispatcher for further treatments. – Flush the skin with cool running water for 15 minutes to “Dilute, remove and reduce the chemical reaction.

e) “Injected” Check the packaging of the poison if available and refer back to the MSDS if available about treatments, listen to your 911 dispatcher for further treatments. – keep the puncture site lower than the heart if possible, have the person rest comfortably, “NEVER” suck out the poison seek medical aid.

RECOVERY Position:

1) Kneel Beside the victim and place the victims furthest arm from you above their head.

2) Place the arm closest to you across the victims chest as a protector arm.

3) The Key is in their Knee, bend the nearest leg up at the knee.

4) Carefully slip your hand under the hollow of the victims neck to support the Head Neck & Spine, at the same time use your forearm by slipping it carefully under the shoulder for leverage.

5) Place your free hand on the Key Knee and gently roll the victim away from you by applying steady pressure against the knee and shoulder at the same time. The victims head should rest on their raised arm.

6) To secure the position pull the key knee further up and bring their protector arm out to use the elbow to stabilize the position.

7) Check the Airway to make sure their still breathing.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd

#FirstAidCourseEdmonton #FirstAidAndBasicLifeSupport #BasicLifeSupport #BLS #BLSforHCP #BCLS #BCLSCourseEdmonton #ACLS #AdvancedCardiovascularLifeSupport #MFR #EmergencyMedicalResponder #ITLS #ChemicalExposure #MSDS #SDS #GHS #WHMIS #Poisons #Poisoning

Sudden Medical Emergencies “Part 4 – Childbirth”

Sudden Medical Emergencies “Part 4 – Childbirth”

One emergency that you may face could in fact be “bringing a new person into this world”. Childbirth is a natural part of our existence, however it can seem more than “Normal or Natural” if you are not expecting it or unprepared on the steps. In many cases with Childbirth you will have plenty of time to assist the new mom to the hospital before the child is born, “However” if mom feels that something is wrong, or you feel panicked “Don’t hesitate to call 911 and Paramedic’s will be there shortly to assist you. Its good to know the steps just in case you can’t make it to a medical facility.

“For those choosing Home Birth”

  • – Consult your medical professionals “Before” you chose to take the path of a “Home Birth“. The steps as well as possible problems should be carefully planned so that you have a complete understanding of what to expect.
  • -A “Midwife” may also be needed to help assist in the Home Birth to continue a smooth transition from womb to world. A “Midwife” is a specialist dedicated to Obstetrics and the female reproductive system as well as birthing at child on your own.

MYTH BUST:

  • – “Boiling WaterYou do “NOT” need to boil water during child birth, in the early 1900’s and prior this was used for two main reasons, to help sterilize surgical tools that may be used to assist, and to help anyone who may be in shock “Small task to divert the mind”. If there is someone who is panicked you may tell “them” to boil water to help relax them, keep the boiling water far from the woman giving birth to avoid burns and exposure.
  • – “Cutting the CordYou do “NOT” need to cut the cord, an umbilical cord is a “Life Line” from the mother to the baby that provides blood, oxygen and nutrients. Always leave the cord intact as it will help continue providing oxygen enriched blood to the infant as long as the placenta is attached with the umbilical cord to mom and the baby. “DO NOT CUT THE CORD” this will be left for medical professionals, your midwife or your 911 dispatcher to assist you in doing so.

What to watch for:

  • – Contractions “Roughly 2 minutes apart or less
  • – The woman says “I think the baby is coming”
  • – The baby’s head is showing
  • – Extreme lower abdominal pain that comes and goes with the feeling of “Wanting to bare down” This is for those who do not know they are pregnant or have no help

NOTES TO REMEMBER:

  • – Women who have had children previously often have a shorter labor.
  • – Throughout the process continue to give the woman encouragement and reassurance.
  • – Give the woman as much privacy as possible
  • – It’s OK to be nervous

How to help in Childbirth:

1) Check the area, once the area is safe, Check the person and ensure the persons ABC’s are present “Airway / Breathing / CirculationREMEMBERWear gloves if available to avoid bodily fluids.

2) Call 911 and get an AED if you are alone, you suspect a Head / Neck or Spine injury, there is a motor vehicle collision, dangerous environment or the injured persons life could be at risk.

3) Care for the Childbirth by:

Always follow recommendations by your Emergency Response professionals and 911 Dispatch personnel. “Never endanger yourself or the woman, you may “not” need to move or roll the woman”

  • – If there are other life threatening injuries, treat those first as quickly as possible with as little movement to the injured person.

a) Help the woman to be as comfortable and calm as possible

b) Wash your hands and put on medical gloves if available “have the woman remove any pants or underwear, drape a blanket over her to keep privacy.

c) Put clean towels, a blanket, or any available material under her buttocks “Have her lay on her back” with a pillow under the small of the back and head as she rests her shoulders against the floor. This helps place the woman in a position to raise the knees with comfort for delivery. Semi-Sitting against a wall also works.

d) As the woman pushes with contractions encourage her to breath in through the nose then out through the mouth to increase air flow.

e) “Control the head” – As the baby’s head comes out, support it with one hand. Do not push or pull the baby. (NOTE) If you do not see the head make sure that 911 has been contacted immediately, you will need the help of Medical Professionals or the baby and moms life could be in danger. Check to see if the umbilical cord is wrapped around the neck, if it is use a single finger to remove it by moving it over one of the shoulders or over the head “Do not pull”

f) “Delivering the Shoulder’s” – Once the shoulders come out, be prepared for the rest of the baby to come out very quickly. Newborns are slippery, so hold the baby firmly but “do not squeeze.” Don’t drop the baby.

g) “Delivering the Body / Legs” – As the body advances, slide one hand down the length of the body and cradle the baby, Use a towel to hold the baby as it will be slippery.

h) “Complete the Delivery” – “Time to Breath” Hold the baby in a football position with the head down, wipe the baby’s mouth and nose with a clean cloth and suction out the mouth “Bulb suction or Turkey baster if nothing else“. Make sure the baby is breathing, if not stimulate the baby by rubbing the back and feet while drying the baby vigorously. If the baby does not breath and turns grey / ashen tone begin CPR 30 compression’s 2 breaths until medical help arrives. When the baby breaths, wrap the baby in a warm blanket and keep close to the mother when she is ready. The baby will naturally want to breast feed soon.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd

#FirstAidCourseEdmonton #FirstAidAndBasicLifeSupport #BasicLifeSupport #BLS #BLSforHCP #BCLS #BCLSCourseEdmonton #ACLS #AdvancedCardiovascularLifeSupport #MFR #EmergencyMedicalResponder #ITLS #Childbirth #EmergencyChildBirth

Sudden Medical Emergencies “Part 3 – Seizures”

Sudden Medical Emergencies “Part 3 – Seizures”

Another common forms of sudden medical emergency is a Seizure, a seizure is a sudden temporary alteration of brain function leading to spontaneous movement or absence of consciousness. Abnormal electrical signals in the brain result in disturbed brain function, shaking, contraction of limbs and altered personality / consciousness are common.

In many cases a seizure is “Not life threatening it iswhere it happened” or “what caused” the seizure that can lead to a potentially life threatening event. A seizure from a fever “Febrile” or having a seizure in water, while walking down stairs, or even from a drug overdose / withdrawal may become life threatening. In many cases the seizure will pass on its own within a few moments, if the seizure last longer than 3-5 minutes, happens repeatedly, or if potentially life threatening event may have caused it, call 911 and never waste time.

Causes:

  • – Head Injuries
  • – Fever as known as “Febrile seizure
  • – Certain Medical Condition “Epilepsy
  • – Poisons “including drugs
  • – Drug or alcohol withdrawal
  • – Heat Stroke
  • – Certain Video games or other audiovisual stimulation that involves flashes
  • – Infection
  • – Preeclampsia / Eclampsia during pregnancy

Signs and Symptoms of Seizure:

  • – Uncontrollable muscle movement
  • – Eye rolling upward, back into the head
  • – Drool or foam in the mouth
  • – Absent stare with no ability to rouse the patient
  • – Appearance of daydreaming
  • – Hallucinations such as seeing, hearing, tasting or smelling something that doesn’t actually exist.
  • – A sense of urgency to get to safety
  • – Convulsions

Prevention:

  • – Follow the guidelines from your health care provider if you are known to have epilepsy or regular seizures.
  • – If you have seizures, take your prescribed medication regularly.
  • – If a child has a fever, make sure it doesn’t get too high, if a child’s fever is higher than a fever caused by a normal cold or flu, seek medical attention immediately.
  • – Limit the amount of time spent playing video games

Baby or Child with a Fever over 39 C (102 F)

  • -Young children or babies with a high fever can have seizures “Febrile”. In most cases these are not life-threatening and they do not last long. However the child or baby should be taken to emergency immediately to prevent further potential brain injury.
  • -Normal Body Temperature = 37 C (98.6 F)

What to do:

1) Give the child medication recommended by the child’s doctor to reduce the fever.

2) Give the child a sponge bath with water that is “room temperature” (not icy cold) – Ice cold water during a fever may cause the patient to go into shock.

3) Provide continual care by seeking a medical direction.

(NOTE) These steps only “temporarily” lower the temperature, “seek medical attention immediately.”

How to help a Seizure:

1) Check the area, once the area is safe, Check the person and ensure the persons ABC’s are present “Airway / Breathing / CirculationREMEMBERWear gloves if available to avoid bodily fluids. (NEVER PUT ANYTHING IN THE PERSONS MOUTH”

2) Call 911 and get an AED if you are alone, you suspect a Head / Neck or Spine injury, there is a motor vehicle collision, dangerous environment or the injured persons life could be at risk.

3) Care for the Seizure casualty by:

Always follow recommendations by your Emergency Response professionals and 911 Dispatch personnel. “Never endanger yourself or the victim, you may “not” need to move or roll the injured person”

  • – If there are other life threatening injuries, treat those first as quickly as possible with as little movement to the injured person.
  • NEVER PUT ANYTHING IN THE PERSONS MOUTH – The patient will “not” swallow their tongue.

a) Do not restrain the patient – allow the person to move without restraint.

b) Protect the person from injury by moving furniture, protecting the person’s head with blankets and keep other dangers away from the person.

After the seizure “Postictal”:

1) Ensure the person’s ABC’s are present

2) Perform a secondary survey and treat any non-life threatening conditions. Make sure there aren’t any fluids in the person’s mouth, place the person in the recovery position, keep the person comfortable and warm.

(NOTE) Many patents will feel ill, thirsty and disoriented, help re-hydrate the patient with high electrolyte drinks, find a position of comfort, and rest. Seek medical attention if the seizure returns.

While you wait for an ambulance:

RECOVERY Position:

1) Kneel Beside the victim and place the victims furthest arm from you above their head.

2) Place the arm closest to you across the victims chest as a protector arm.

3) The Key is in their Knee, bend the nearest leg up at the knee.

4) Carefully slip your hand under the hollow of the victims neck to support the Head Neck & Spine, at the same time use your forearm by slipping it carefully under the shoulder for leverage.

5) Place your free hand on the Key Knee and gently roll the victim away from you by applying steady pressure against the knee and shoulder at the same time. The victims head should rest on their raised arm.

6) To secure the position pull the key knee further up and bring their protector arm out to use the elbow to stabilize the position.

7) Check the Airway to make sure their still breathing.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd

#FirstAidCourseEdmonton #FirstAidAndBasicLifeSupport #BasicLifeSupport #BLS #BLSforHCP #BCLS #BCLSCourseEdmonton #ACLS #AdvancedCardiovascularLifeSupport #MFR #EmergencyMedicalResponder #ITLS #Seizures #TonicClonic #Decorticate #Deceberate #FebrileSeizure #AbsenceSeizure

Sudden Medical Emergencies “Part 2 – Diabetes”

Sudden Medical Emergencies “Part 2 – Diabetes”

One of the most common forms of sudden medical emergencies is Diabetes, a diabetic emergency happens when the body cannot control the level of sugar in the blood. The blood sugar level may become too high “Hyperglycemia” or too low “hypoglycemia“. “Literally Diabetes means an imbalance in sugars“, this can alter the victims mental state, breathing rate, might feel or look ill or even appear intoxicated. Once you are able to recognize sings and symptoms the steps to help someone with Diabetes is quite simple.

To help someone who is a Diabetic or a potential Diabetic we should first look at some of the “potential causes“. These causes are a reference to the body’s imbalance between two or more factors.

Causes:

  • – Pregnancy
  • – Lack of Exercise or too much
  • – Imbalanced food intake “High sugar / fat diets
  • – Insulin production “Often organ damage / failure / Malfunction

Signs and Symptoms of Diabetes:

  • – Unusual thirst
  • – Frequent urination
  • – Weight change (gain or loss)
  • – Extreme fatigue or lack of energy
  • – Blurred vision
  • – Frequent or recurring infections
  • – Cuts and bruises that are slow to heal
  • – Tingling or numbness in the hands or feet
  • – Trouble getting or maintaining an erection

Prevention:

  • – Proper Nutrition
  • – Proper exercise
  • – Weight management
  • – Take your medications as prescribed
  • – Check your blood sugar often, especially if you are sick or not following your normal routine.
  • – Keep some quick sugar foods with you at all times.
  • – Lifestyle management

What a Diabetic Emergency looks like:

  • – Changes in the level of consciousness
  • – Changes in behavior, such as confusion or aggression
  • – Rapid Breathing
  • – Cool, sweaty skin
  • – Skin that is paler than normal
  • – Appearance of intoxication
  • – Feeling and looking ill

How to help a Diabetic: High or Low Sugars

1) Check the area, once the area is safe, Check the person and ensure the persons ABC’s are present “Airway / Breathing / CirculationREMEMBERWear gloves if available to avoid bodily fluids.

2) Call 911 and get an AED if you are alone, you suspect a Head / Neck or Spine injury, there is a motor vehicle collision, dangerous environment or the injured persons life could be at risk.

3) Care for the Diabetic casualty by:

Always follow recommendations by your Emergency Response professionals and 911 Dispatch personnel. “Never endanger yourself or the victim, you may “not” need to move or roll the injured person

  • – If there are other life threatening injuries, treat those first as quickly as possible with as little movement to the injured person.

a) If the casualty is conscious and knows its a diabetic emergency“, offer the person a sugary drink such as orange or apple juice. If the person’s condition improves, recommend he or she eat a complete meal to stabilize

b) If the casualty is unconscious” Perform a secondary survey and place the person in the recovery position, continue care until EMS personnel arrive. “Do not stick anything in the casualty’s mouth as they may choke or stop breathing

While you wait for an ambulance:

RECOVERY Position:

  • 1) Kneel Beside the victim and place the victims furthest arm from you above their head.
  • 2) Place the arm closest to you across the victims chest as a protector arm.
  • 3) The Key is in their Knee, bend the nearest leg up at the knee.
  • 4) Carefully slip your hand under the hollow of the victims neck to support the Head Neck & Spine, at the same time use your forearm by slipping it carefully under the shoulder for leverage.
  • 5) Place your free hand on the Key Knee and gently roll the victim away from you by applying steady pressure against the knee and shoulder at the same time. The victims head should rest on their raised arm.
  • 6) To secure the position pull the key knee further up and bring their protector arm out to use the elbow to stabilize the position.
  • 7) Check the Airway to make sure their still breathing.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd

#FirstAidCourseEdmonton #FirstAidAndBasicLifeSupport #BasicLifeSupport #BLS #BLSforHCP #BCLS #BCLSCourseEdmonton #ACLS #AdvancedCardiovascularLifeSupport #MFR #EmergencyMedicalResponder #ITLS #Diabetes #Type1Diabetes #Type2Diabetes

Bone, Muscle, & Joint Injuries “Part 4 Slings”

Bone, Muscle, & Joint Injuries “Part 4 Slings”

Our last installments of Bone Muscle & Joint injuries focused on how it implement a splint within the emergency setting, now that we have taken care of an injury we can add some basic techniques to help the person rest in a comfortable position while you wait for an ambulance or while you are on rout to a medical facility. Always remember that “you may not have to move a patient” waiting for a Medical Professional may help minimize further injury or discomfort.

Slings:

“A sling is a bandage or cloth used to support an injured arm, consisting of a wide triangular piece of cloth hanging around the neck for support of the injured limb.”

There are 2 Main Types of Slings:

  • – Regular Sling “The arm is held horizontally across the abdomen
  • – Tube Sling “The Arm is held slightly vertical against the chest

How to apply a Sling:

  • a) Determine which type of “Sling” will help the casualty get the most comfort out of the least amount of movement of the injured body part. “Arm down – use Regular Sling / Arm up – use Tube Sling” Use what you have available. Your sling material should be long enough to touch the floor and the casualty’s shoulder as a general rule and be in a triangular shape if possible “As wide as the torso is another way to utilize other materials not in a triangular shape”
  • b) When possible, sling the injured part in the position in which it was found or the most comfortable. “Movement may increase pain and lead to long term damage or side effects”. Always consult a medical professional before moving a damaged body part.

Regular Sling:

1) Check circulation by comparing the warmth and color of the fingers with the other hand “Ask the casualty if they are experiencing numbness or tingling, rings should be removed if possible

2) From the most comfortable position, have the casualty support the injured arm, holding it across the body with the fingers pointed at the opposite shoulder:

  • -Position the open triangular bandage under the injured arm, against the body. The point of the triangular bandage should extend past the elbow. The opposite, or bottom, end should be strait up and down on the body with the upper end over the shoulder.
  • -Take the bottom end of the bandage and place it over the opposite shoulder.

3) Tie the bandage at the back of the neck, making sure that the knot does not create any discomfort.

4) Twist the top of the point of the bandage.

5) Tie a broad bandage from the elbow on the injured side across the body “To secure the sling against the torso”

6) Recheck circulation

Tube Sling:

1) Check circulation by comparing the warmth and color of the fingers with the other hand “Ask the casualty if they are experiencing numbness or tingling, rings should be removed if possible

2) Put the forearm of the injured side across the chest, with the fingers pointed at the opposite arm.

3) Position the open triangular bandage over the forearm and hand. “The point of the triangular bandage should extend past the point of the elbow and shoulder

4) Support the forearm and carefully tuck the bandage under all the way from the hand to the elbow.

5) Carry the end of the bandage near the elbow around the back. “Twist the top of the point of the bandage near the elbow to secure the elbow from coming out of the sling”

6) Adjust the height of the sling to make sure it is supporting the arm. “Tie the ends together in the hollow of the neck on the uninjured side

7) Pad between the arm and the body, in the natural hollow with soft, firm material.

8) Tie a broad bandage from the elbow on the injured side across the body.

9) Recheck Circulation

How to help with a Bone, Muscle & Joint Injury:

1) Check the area, once the area is safe, Check the person and ensure the persons ABC’s are present “Airway / Breathing / CirculationREMEMBERWear gloves if available to avoid bodily fluids.

2) Call 911 and get an AED if you are alone, you suspect a Head / Neck or Spine injury, there is a motor vehicle collision, dangerous environment or the injured persons life could be at risk. “If you expect the ambulance to arrive shortly, keep the person still and do not splint the injury. If the ambulance can be delayed “Immobilize the injury in the position found” NEVER straighten a broken bone without medical assistance and expertise

3) Care for the Bone Muscle & Joint Injury by:

Always follow recommendations by your Emergency Response professionals and 911 Dispatch personnel. “Never endanger yourself or the victim, you may “not” need to move or roll the injured person”

  • – If there are other life threatening injuries, treat those first as quickly as possible with as little movement to the injured person.

a) Treat the injury using the “R.I.C.E” method

b) Cool the injured area for 20 minutes of every hour for the first 24 to 48 hours. If you use ice, put some sort of thin cloth or pad between it and the bare skin to avoid freezing the skin.

c) Elevate the injured are above the level of the heart if possible. “Often a position of comfort is more than enough to help alleviate pain and swelling

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd

#FirstAidCourseEdmonton #FirstAidAndBasicLifeSupport #BasicLifeSupport #BLS #BLSforHCP #BCLS #BCLSCourseEdmonton #ACLS #AdvancedCardiovascularLifeSupport #MFR #EmergencyMedicalResponder #ITLS #BoneMuscleJointInjuries #Sprain #Strain #Dislocation #Fracture #Splints #Slings #MuscleCramp

Bone, Muscle, & Joint Injuries “Part 1”

Bone, Muscle, & Joint Injuries “Part 1”

Sprains, strains, dislocations and fractures are all part of this portion of First Aid training as its such a common injury during almost any every day task. Slips, trips, falls, improper lift techniques or just plain accidents, your body can be subjected to twists, turns and impacts that can cause damage to almost any body part. In this portion it would seem that the amount of information can be staggering, but we can break it down into the basic groups on what we can do, what we should avoid doing, and what helps the victim feel the most comfortable during this injury.

What is it?:

  • Sprain – “The stretching or tearing of ligaments at the joints
  • Strains – “Stretching and or tearing of muscles or tendons from their natural position causing damage and pain
  • Dislocations – “An injury that moves a bone out of its normal position at a joint.
  • Fracture – “A break, chip, or crack in a bone. In an “open” fracture, the bone breaks through the skin, in a “closed” fracture, the skin is not broken.

Causes:

  • – Falls
  • – Awkward or sudden movements
  • – Motor vehicle collisions
  • – Direct blows to the body
  • – Repetitive forces, such as running “Stress fractures
  • – Contact or non-contact sports

Prevention:

  • – Always wear seat belts & shoulder restraints when your in a vehicle.
  • – Small children must be in an approved and properly installed child restraint system when in a vehicle “Car seat / booster seat
  • – During activities, wear the appropriate safety equipment correctly “Helmets, goggles & pads to help save you from injury
  • – Put non-slip adhesive strips or a mat in the bath to prevent falls
  • – Wear proper sports equipment to avoid injury
  • – Check water depth before diving
  • – Stretch before exercising
  • – Enter above ground pools always feet first
  • – Know your limits, when you are too tired or frustrated, take a break.
  • – Falls are the leading cause of injuries among the elderly. Reduce the risk with safety measures like “Good lighting, Sturdy railings, Non slip floors or rugs

In our next post on Sprains, strains, dislocations and fractures we will focus on what to do to help a person once the injury has occurred. Bone, muscle, and joint injuries are almost always painful. Without first aid, they can lead to serious injuries and even permanent disabilities. In some cases, they can be life-threatening.

Things to Remember!

1) Never Shake a baby or Child

2) Take a breather and place the baby or child in a safe place.

3) You are not alone, if you need help call “811” and talk though it.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

#FirstAidCourseEdmonton #FirstAidAndBasicLifeSupport #BasicLifeSupport #BLS #BLSforHCP #BCLS #BCLSCourseEdmonton #ACLS #AdvancedCardiovascularLifeSupport #MFR #EmergencyMedicalResponder #ITLS #BoneMuscleJointInjuries #Sprain #Strain #Dislocation #Fracture

Head & Spine Injuries – Part 2 “Moving a Person”

Head & Spine Injuries – Part 2 “Moving a Person”

As mentioned in the previous post, Head and Spine injuries are very common and can be fatal, those who also survive injuries from Head or Spinal injuries can have physical difficulties and problems from either brain or spine damage. But what happens if the person is in a dangerous location? Their laying face down in a puddle? or their airway could be obstructed? These scenarios can make the Head / Neck & Spine injury seem even worse. “Should I move them? Will I cause more damage to them? Will I paralyze them if I move them?” These questions will also weigh heavy on the situation that you find. You may “Not” have to move a person to assess their breathing, but “Life over Limb” has always been the motto to keep in mind during these dangerous scenarios. If the person dies from lack of breathing or other emergencies, then the spine was the least of their worries. One little rhyme you can remember is “Always Keep The Head / Neck & Spine, In A Strait Line, Hoping It’s All Fine” never try to move a person with Head or Spine injuries unless their life could be threatened.

Common Reason’s to move a Person

“You should always suspect a Head / Neck & Spine injury if the person has been subjected to an Impact / Speed or an Energy Forced against the body with motion, or if you find a unconscious victim from an unknown reason”

  • – Motor vehicle collisions on a busy highway
  • – Fire
  • – Wild animals
  • – Toxic gas or chemicals

“Always Keep The Head / Neck & Spine, In A Strait Line, Hoping It’s All Fine” never try to move a person with Head or Spine injuries unless their life could be threatened.

How to help with Head & Spine Injuries:

1) Check the area, once the area is safe, Check the person and ensure the persons ABC’s are present “Airway / Breathing / CirculationREMEMBERWear gloves if available to avoid bodily fluids.

2) Call 911 and get an AED if you are alone, you suspect a Head / Neck or Spine injury, there is a motor vehicle collision, dangerous environment or the injured persons life could be at risk.

3) Care for the Head / Neck & Spine Injury by:

Always follow recommendations by your Emergency Response professionals and 911 Dispatch personnel. “Never endanger yourself or the victim, you may “not” need to move or roll the injured person

  • – If there are other life threatening injuries, treat those first as quickly as possible with as little movement to the injured person torso.
  • – Make sure you move the Head / Neck or Spine as little as possible, even slight movement may cause further injuries.
  • -Place your hands on both sides of the injured person’s head. Gently support the person’s head in the position in which you find it until EMS personnel arrive.
  • – If the injured person is wearing a helmet, leave it on unless it makes it difficult for you to ensure the ABC’s “Airway, Breathing, Circulation” are present.
  • -If the person is laying face down in water / mud or if their airway could be compromised due to their position or injuries, roll the person using the H.A.IN.E.S technique or with multiple partners use the “H.A.IN.E.S Log Roll“, insuring that you keep the head / neck & spine in a the position you find them even as you roll them. Never “straighten” an injured victim suspected of Head / Neck or Spine injuries.
  • -Continue care until further help arrives.

If the person vomits, carefully roll them onto one side to keep the airway clear.

“How to Roll A Person with a Head / Neck or Spine Injury”

To “Log Roll” a person using the previously known as “H.A.IN.E.S Technique” is the best option using multiple First Aid respondents, the more people you have helping the easier it will be to keep a person’s Head / Neck & Spine in the position you found it. “NEVER” Straighten a person’s Head / Neck or Spine if they are bent in an awkward position, only straighten or move the person if their airway could be compromised or their life as a whole is in danger. To perform a log roll on a person you must first learn how to roll someone by yourself, this will make the “Log Roll” easier to accomplish once there are multiple people aiding the casualty.

H.A.IN.E.S – Stands For

  • High – Arm – In – Endangered – Spine

The H.A.IN.E.S technique is designed to keep the head, neck and spine in a relatively strait line as you roll the person over avoiding further damage or spinal injuries. As we may not know what caused the person’s injuries or emergency once the person is face down remember its often difficult to breath face down on the ground, rolling them over secures the airway and makes it possible to perform CPR or other life saving techniques.

To Roll a Person Over using the “H.A.IN.E.S Technique” :

1) Kneel Beside the victim and place the victims furthest arm from you above their head.”High – Arm” In Endangered Spine.

2) Place the arm closest to you against the victims side.

3) Cross the legs using the leg that is closest to you to overlap hooking the ankles.

4) Place a hand under the victim’s jaw using your thumb and index finger to grip the jaw firmly letting your last three fingers rest against the side of the neck. Slip your forearm under the victims shoulder to act as a lever.

5) Grip the victims belt by the hip with your remaining hand, if the victim is not wearing a belt grip the pant material firmly

6) In unison with both arms “Roll the victim slowly away from you keeping the Head, neck and spine in line. As you roll the victim notice that the head should be resting on the “High-Arm“. Once the victim is on their hip their own body weight should carry them over onto their back “Slow is smooth, and smooth is fast” Make sure to guide the head neck and spine down gently to the ground keeping them in line to avoid potential spinal injuries.

  • -Check the Airway to make sure the person is still breathing. If they are not breathing “Start CPR” 30 Compression’s, 2 breaths for all age groups.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

#FirstAidCourseEdmonton #FirstAidAndBasicLifeSupport #BasicLifeSupport #BLS #BLSforHCP #BCLS #BCLSCourseEdmonton #ACLS #AdvancedCardiovascularLifeSupport #MFR #EmergencyMedicalResponder #ITLS #HeadNeckSpine #SpineInjuries #Quadriplegic

Head & Spine Injuries – Part 1 “Causes & Prevention”

Head & Spine Injuries – Part 1 “Causes & Prevention”

Head and Spine injuries are very common and can be fatal, those who also survive injuries from Head or Spinal injuries can have physical difficulties and problems from either brain or spine damage. Paralysis “Quadriplegia, Paraplegia,” loss of motor skill or function, altered behavior & disorders are also included with damage of this nature. Even permanent disability is something we must consider in this post. The spine is the electrical transmitter through your body that carries the brains impulses and commands through out your organs, to disrupt this can have serious long lasting effects. Lets focus on common causes, prevention and a basic overview on how to help with Head / Neck & Spine injuries. One little rhyme you can remember is “Always Keep The Head / Neck & Spine, In A Strait Line, Hoping It’s All Finenever try to move a person with Head or Spine injuries unless their life could be threatened.

Common Causes

“You should always suspect a Head / Neck & Spine injury if the person has been subjected to an Impact / Speed or an Energy Forced against the body with motion, or if you find a unconscious victim from an unknown reason”

  • – Motor vehicle collisions
  • – Recreation or Contact Sports Injuries
  • – Falls
  • – Assaults or Violent Acts

Prevention:

  • – Always buckle up, “safety belts & restraints save lives
  • – Make sure car seats for Children are approved for your region.
  • – Sports protective gear should always be utilized when possible.
  • – Before you attempt a new sport or “stunt” check to see what the potential risks are to your own body. Many injuries can be avoided with some foresight.
  • – Protect stairways from small children with gates and keep well light.
  • – Consult the safety manual for any construction or work equipment that is new to you.
  • – Drink responsibly and never combine medications with alcohol.
  • – Always follow the directions on over the counter medications & prescription drugs.

“Many Head / Neck & Spine Injuries happen in water, to prevent this”

  • -Look before you dive, insure the water deep enough, some pools at hotels or at home may not be deep enough for diving.
  • – Enter unknown or dark / murky water feet first.
  • – Never swim alone, having a buddy will help reduce risk of accidental drowning.
  • – When your body-surfing / surfing or wake-boarding keep your arms in front of you to protect your head / neck and keep balance.
  • – Never combine drinking and boating, boats are still a motorized vehicle.

“Always Keep The Head / Neck & Spine, In A Strait Line, Hoping It’s All Fine” never try to move a person with Head or Spine injuries unless their life could be threatened.

How to help with Head & Spine Injuries:

1) Check the area, once the area is safe, Check the person and ensure the persons ABC’s are present “Airway / Breathing / CirculationREMEMBERWear gloves if available to avoid bodily fluids.

2) Call 911 and get an AED if you are alone, you suspect a Head / Neck or Spine injury, there is a motor vehicle collision, dangerous environment or the injured persons life could be at risk.

3) Care for the Head / Neck & Spine Injury by:

Always follow recommendations by your Emergency Response professionals and 911 Dispatch personnel. “Never endanger yourself or the victim, you may “not” need to move or roll the injured person”

  • – If there are other life threatening injuries, treat those first as quickly as possible with as little movement to the injured person torso.
  • – Make sure you move the Head / Neck or Spine as little as possible, even slight movement may cause further injuries.
  • -Place your hands on both sides of the injured person’s head. Gently support the person’s head in the position in which you find it until EMS personnel arrive.
  • – If the injured person is wearing a helmet, leave it on unless it makes it difficult for you to ensure the ABC’s “Airway, Breathing, Circulation” are present.
  • -If the person is laying face down in water / mud or if their airway could be compromised due to their position or injuries, roll the person using the H.A.IN.E.S technique or with multiple partners use the “H.A.IN.E.S Log Roll“, insuring that you keep the head / neck & spine in a the position you find them even as you roll them. Never “straighten” an injured victim suspected of Head / Neck or Spine injuries.
  • -Continue care until further help arrives.

If the person vomits, carefully roll them onto one side to keep the airway clear.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

#FirstAidCourseEdmonton #FirstAidAndBasicLifeSupport #BasicLifeSupport #BLS #BLSforHCP #BCLS #BCLSCourseEdmonton #ACLS #AdvancedCardiovascularLifeSupport #MFR #EmergencyMedicalResponder #ITLS #HeadNeckSpine #SpineInjuries #Quadriplegic

Burns – Part 1 “Fire Safety”

Burns – Part 1 “Fire Safety”

Burns are injuries to the body’s tissues caused by either chemicals, electricity, heat or radiation. As burns can come from so many different sources we will break them down into sections to help you see the vastness of information, but also brings to light how “easy” burns are once you get the science of energy and how the damage to your body from Thermal Energy “Hot or Cold” is relatively similar in how we treat it. A little slogan to remember about Thermal Energy is “Hot is fast but Cold is Slow“, this little saying will help you see that if a burn from “heat” can happen fast, then we can treat it fast, but just like it takes a while for an ice cube to form “slow” that means that your body will likewise take damage from cold “Slowly“. “This does not include Dry Ice, Please refer to Chemical Burns” One more question we get during this portion is “What is the most common cause of death during a burn?” The answer is always “Infection“, we will bring more light on why in the next posts associated with Burns.

Common Causes of fire in the home:

  • – Insecure combustible materials ie: gasoline, hair spray, oil
  • – Unattended Cooking, or cooking oils secured inappropriately
  • – Smoking in the home without securing “Butts” or Smoking in bed.
  • – Faulty Heating Equipment or electrical devices
  • – Fire Pits not secured or inspected properly
  • – Furnace & Fire Place chimney’s or flue not cleaned properly

Prevention:

“Always follow safety guidelines, many Fire preventing methods have been put together by Occupational Health and Safety and your local Fire Departments for your own personal protection.

  • – Store Chemicals / fuels / oils and compressed cylinders appropriately as stated in the MSDS or manufacturers specs.
  • Never Keep cooking oils “Above” the stove, if there is a fire on the stove this may act as an accelerant.
  • – Have fire pits inspected and licensed by your local licensing inspector to ensure your homes safety.
  • – Never keep your BBQ or other heat sources against a wall / siding or or other flammable materials.
  • – Have a plan, know your exits and help your family understand the benefits of an “Emergency Response Plan” play / practice them with children to keep everyone safe.
  • – Making sure you have working smoke detectors in the hallways near any sleeping areas, at the top of stairs, and in every bedroom. in some provinces and territories, legislation dictates where smoke detectors must be located.
  • – Never leave a fire pit / place unattended “Embers can reignite
  • -Ensure that Fire extinguishers are kept up to date

Fire Safety Tips

Fires are caused by numerous things found commonly in the home: Heating equipment, appliances, electrical wiring and cooking. Having a Fire Safety Plan or even an ERP “Emergency Response Plan” is always a good idea for any family.

Plan & Practice a fire escape route with your family by:

  • – Sketch a floor plan of your home that shows all the rooms, doors, windows, and hallways.
  • – Draw arrows that show how to escape from each room. If possible, show two ways to get out of each room. Planning to escape sleeping areas is most important because most fires happen at night.
  • – Plan where everyone will meet after leaving the building.
  • -Assign someone to call the fire department after leaving the burning building.
  • – When you travel, take a moment to find out the local emergency number and keep it on hand.
  • – If you stay in a hotel, learn escape routes and emergency procedures in case of a fire.

How to Escape from a Fire:

1) Check the area, if there is smoke, get low and crawl to get out of the building quickly, “Never return to a burning building” Make sure children are able to open windows, go down a ladder, or lower themselves to the ground. “Play / Practice with them

**NOTE**

  • – If you are unable to get out, “stay in the room“. Stuff towels, rags, or clothing around doors and vents. If you have access to water, wet the materials first.

2) Call 911 “Even if rescuers are already outside, tell the 911 dispatcher exactly where you are.

3) Care for yourself and family by staying calm, get low “Avoid Smoke“, get out by crawling. Follow your emergency response plan as best as you are able. Protect yourself “Never return to a burning building as you may be overcome by smoke, heat, or explosion.”

  • Always follow recommendations by your Emergency Response professionals and 911 Dispatch personnel.

If you are on fire “STOP, DROP & ROLL”

Fire Pit Regulations:

  • For General Purpose – Fire pits should be a minimum of 10 too 15 feet from any other potentially combustible material. A maximum of 2 feet tall, 3 feet wide, with the addition of an ash catch screen when possible. Water should be easily accessible within 20 feet and never use an ignition source such as gasoline to light a fire. For more information consult your local municipality on regulations, inspections and licensing for your own personal fire pit.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

#FirstAidCourseEdmonton #FirstAidAndBasicLifeSupport #BasicLifeSupport #BLS #BLSforHCP #BCLS #BCLSCourseEdmonton #ACLS #AdvancedCardiovascularLifeSupport #MFR #EmergencyMedicalResponder #ITLS #FirePit #FireSafety #WildFire #StopDropRoll

Wound Care – Part 9 “Infection & Disease Control”

Wound Care – Part 9 “Infection & Disease Control”

For the 9th part of Wound Care we will focus on Infections, Diseases and ways to prevent or control them once they have begun. “An infection is a condition caused by the invasion of the body by germ” these germs can be bacteria in nature or even viral. During our First Aid Course we run into many questions about infection & Disease Control, we consider disease control such a high priority that we even offer a course designed specifically to address Diseases “Blood-Born Pathogens”. During a First Aid we will advise all rescuers to “Consider ALL patients/victims as infectious” & always avoid bodily fluids during First Aid!

Common Cause’s of Infection:

  • -Foreign bodies like dirt, or other things containing germs that get into a wound

Routs of Entry for Disease:

  • -Direct Contact “When you touch the blood of someone infected
  • Indirect Contact When you touch something used by an infected individual
  • -Airborne TransmissionWhen an infected person sneezes, sending germs into the air and you breath them in
  • Vector-Borne When a mosquito bites an infected person then bites you, may even be referred to as zoonotic”

Prevention:

  • -Wear PPE or Personal Protective Equipment when available
  • -Always wash your hands before and after giving first aid.
  • -Whenever possible “WEAR GLOVES” avoid bodily fluids
  • -Use sterile dressings when caring for wounds
  • -“Keep your immunizations up to date” if you have a wound and have not received a “Tetanus” shot in more than “Five Years” seek medical attention. REMEMBER “Immunizations ARE beneficialIT IS A MYTH that immunizations cause birth defects.
  • -Use antibiotic ointment on a wound to help reduce risk of infection
  • -keep wounds clean

**HAND SANITIZERS** and alcohol rubs must NOT replace hand washing, if you use hand sanitizer its a good practice to wash your hands after the THIRD use!

What Infection Looks Like:

  • -Redness -Red Streaks moving away from the wound within the skin – Pus -Heat or warmth – Fever – Tenderness – Swelling – Nausea – Discolored flesh

How to Help:

1) Check the area, once the area is safe, Check the person and ensure the persons ABC’s are present “Airway / Breathing / CirculationREMEMBERWear gloves if available to avoid bodily fluids.

2) Call 911 or if you suspect the infection could be severe like meningitus, whooping cough or if the victim has a fever above 102F / 39C. Or if their airway could be blocked by mucus or an infected organ such as tonsils. “In Alberta you can call “811” as well to speak to a registered nurse for a consult, they may give you options or even recommend further medical attention.”

3) Care for the infection by:

-Keep the wound clean, if the infection spreads, changes color or begins to smell seek medical attention. Change bandages frequently and let wounds dry to reduce chance of infection.

**BABY OR CHILD WITH A FEVER OVER 30C (102F)**

  • -Young children or babies with a high fever can have seizures also known as “Febrile Seizures“. In most cases these are not life-threatening and they do not last long. To prevent “febrile seizures”
  1. 1) Give the child medication recommended by the child’s doctor to reduce the fever.
  2. 2) Give the child a sponge bath with water that is room temperature “Not icy cold
  3. 3) Provide continual care “Many Children may have a Febrile Seizure while sleeping and unattended

Sense these steps only “Temporarily” lower the temperature, seek further medical attention.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

#FirstAidCourseEdmonton #FirstAidAndBasicLifeSupport #BasicLifeSupport #BLS #BLSforHCP #BCLS #BCLSCourseEdmonton #ACLS #AdvancedCardiovascularLifeSupport #MFR #EmergencyMedicalResponder #ITLS #WoundCare #Bruises #Injuries #Cuts #Scrapes #Abrasions #Infection #Disease #DiseasePrevention #InfectionControl