Tag Archives: CPR & AED Level C Training

Sudden Medical Emergencies “Part 2 – Diabetes”

Sudden Medical Emergencies “Part 2 – Diabetes”

One of the most common forms of sudden medical emergencies is Diabetes, a diabetic emergency happens when the body cannot control the level of sugar in the blood. The blood sugar level may become too high “Hyperglycemia” or too low “hypoglycemia“. “Literally Diabetes means an imbalance in sugars“, this can alter the victims mental state, breathing rate, might feel or look ill or even appear intoxicated. Once you are able to recognize sings and symptoms the steps to help someone with Diabetes is quite simple.

To help someone who is a Diabetic or a potential Diabetic we should first look at some of the “potential causes“. These causes are a reference to the body’s imbalance between two or more factors.

Causes:

  • – Pregnancy
  • – Lack of Exercise or too much
  • – Imbalanced food intake “High sugar / fat diets
  • – Insulin production “Often organ damage / failure / Malfunction

Signs and Symptoms of Diabetes:

  • – Unusual thirst
  • – Frequent urination
  • – Weight change (gain or loss)
  • – Extreme fatigue or lack of energy
  • – Blurred vision
  • – Frequent or recurring infections
  • – Cuts and bruises that are slow to heal
  • – Tingling or numbness in the hands or feet
  • – Trouble getting or maintaining an erection

Prevention:

  • – Proper Nutrition
  • – Proper exercise
  • – Weight management
  • – Take your medications as prescribed
  • – Check your blood sugar often, especially if you are sick or not following your normal routine.
  • – Keep some quick sugar foods with you at all times.
  • – Lifestyle management

What a Diabetic Emergency looks like:

  • – Changes in the level of consciousness
  • – Changes in behavior, such as confusion or aggression
  • – Rapid Breathing
  • – Cool, sweaty skin
  • – Skin that is paler than normal
  • – Appearance of intoxication
  • – Feeling and looking ill

How to help a Diabetic: High or Low Sugars

1) Check the area, once the area is safe, Check the person and ensure the persons ABC’s are present “Airway / Breathing / CirculationREMEMBERWear gloves if available to avoid bodily fluids.

2) Call 911 and get an AED if you are alone, you suspect a Head / Neck or Spine injury, there is a motor vehicle collision, dangerous environment or the injured persons life could be at risk.

3) Care for the Diabetic casualty by:

Always follow recommendations by your Emergency Response professionals and 911 Dispatch personnel. “Never endanger yourself or the victim, you may “not” need to move or roll the injured person

  • – If there are other life threatening injuries, treat those first as quickly as possible with as little movement to the injured person.

a) If the casualty is conscious and knows its a diabetic emergency“, offer the person a sugary drink such as orange or apple juice. If the person’s condition improves, recommend he or she eat a complete meal to stabilize

b) If the casualty is unconscious” Perform a secondary survey and place the person in the recovery position, continue care until EMS personnel arrive. “Do not stick anything in the casualty’s mouth as they may choke or stop breathing

While you wait for an ambulance:

RECOVERY Position:

  • 1) Kneel Beside the victim and place the victims furthest arm from you above their head.
  • 2) Place the arm closest to you across the victims chest as a protector arm.
  • 3) The Key is in their Knee, bend the nearest leg up at the knee.
  • 4) Carefully slip your hand under the hollow of the victims neck to support the Head Neck & Spine, at the same time use your forearm by slipping it carefully under the shoulder for leverage.
  • 5) Place your free hand on the Key Knee and gently roll the victim away from you by applying steady pressure against the knee and shoulder at the same time. The victims head should rest on their raised arm.
  • 6) To secure the position pull the key knee further up and bring their protector arm out to use the elbow to stabilize the position.
  • 7) Check the Airway to make sure their still breathing.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd

#FirstAidCourseEdmonton #FirstAidAndBasicLifeSupport #BasicLifeSupport #BLS #BLSforHCP #BCLS #BCLSCourseEdmonton #ACLS #AdvancedCardiovascularLifeSupport #MFR #EmergencyMedicalResponder #ITLS #Diabetes #Type1Diabetes #Type2Diabetes

Sudden Medical Emergencies “Part 1 – Fainting”

Sudden Medical Emergencies “Part 1 – Fainting”

For this segment lets focus on the sudden loss of consciousness known as “Fainting” Passing out, Blacking Out, medically known as Syncope“. Fainting is a brief period of unconsciousness that happens when there isn’t enough blood flowing to the brain. This can cause a rapped decline in thought process, feeling dizzy or light headed which rapidly leads to a complete loss of consciousness.

To help someone who is about to faint or who has already fainted we should first look at some of the potential causes.

Causes:

  • – Pregnancy
  • – Standing / Sitting / Laying in one position for too long without moving.
  • – Pain
  • – Traumatic information, sights or experiences
  • – Heat
  • – Dehydration
  • – Lack of Food or malnutrition

Prevention:

  • – Watch for the warning signs of fainting, such as dizziness or nausea, and intense need to sit or lay down.
  • – Keep hydrated and nourished
  • – Wear loose clothing around the neck
  • – When standing up from sitting or laying down do so slowly

How to help with Fainting:

1) Check the area, once the area is safe, Check the person and ensure the persons ABC’s are present “Airway / Breathing / CirculationREMEMBERWear gloves if available to avoid bodily fluids.

2) Call 911 and get an AED if you are alone, you suspect a Head / Neck or Spine injury, there is a motor vehicle collision, dangerous environment or the injured persons life could be at risk.

3) Care for the Fainting casualty by:

Always follow recommendations by your Emergency Response professionals and 911 Dispatch personnel. “Never endanger yourself or the victim, you may “not” need to move or roll the injured person”

  • – If there are other life threatening injuries, treat those first as quickly as possible with as little movement to the injured person.

a)If you expect the ambulance to arrive shortly, or If the ambulance can be delayed” -Place the person in the recovery position so that blood can start flowing to the brain again and the airway stays open.

b) If the person is pregnant, has a history of heart disease, or has another serious illness, seek medical attention.

RECOVERY Position:

1) Kneel Beside the victim and place the victims furthest arm from you above their head.

2) Place the arm closest to you across the victims chest as a protector arm.

3) The Key is in their Knee, bend the nearest leg up at the knee.

4) Carefully slip your hand under the hollow of the victims neck to support the Head Neck & Spine, at the same time use your forearm by slipping it carefully under the shoulder for leverage.

5) Place your free hand on the Key Knee and gently roll the victim away from you by applying steady pressure against the knee and shoulder at the same time. The victims head should rest on their raised arm.

6) To secure the position pull the key knee further up and bring their protector arm out to use the elbow to stabilize the position.

7) Check the Airway to make sure their still breathing.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd

#FirstAidCourseEdmonton #FirstAidAndBasicLifeSupport #BasicLifeSupport #BLS #BLSforHCP #BCLS #BCLSCourseEdmonton #ACLS #AdvancedCardiovascularLifeSupport #MFR #EmergencyMedicalResponder #ITLS #Fainting #LossofConsciousness #PassedOut

Bone, Muscle, & Joint Injuries “Part 4 Slings”

Bone, Muscle, & Joint Injuries “Part 4 Slings”

Our last installments of Bone Muscle & Joint injuries focused on how it implement a splint within the emergency setting, now that we have taken care of an injury we can add some basic techniques to help the person rest in a comfortable position while you wait for an ambulance or while you are on rout to a medical facility. Always remember that “you may not have to move a patient” waiting for a Medical Professional may help minimize further injury or discomfort.

Slings:

“A sling is a bandage or cloth used to support an injured arm, consisting of a wide triangular piece of cloth hanging around the neck for support of the injured limb.”

There are 2 Main Types of Slings:

  • – Regular Sling “The arm is held horizontally across the abdomen
  • – Tube Sling “The Arm is held slightly vertical against the chest

How to apply a Sling:

  • a) Determine which type of “Sling” will help the casualty get the most comfort out of the least amount of movement of the injured body part. “Arm down – use Regular Sling / Arm up – use Tube Sling” Use what you have available. Your sling material should be long enough to touch the floor and the casualty’s shoulder as a general rule and be in a triangular shape if possible “As wide as the torso is another way to utilize other materials not in a triangular shape”
  • b) When possible, sling the injured part in the position in which it was found or the most comfortable. “Movement may increase pain and lead to long term damage or side effects”. Always consult a medical professional before moving a damaged body part.

Regular Sling:

1) Check circulation by comparing the warmth and color of the fingers with the other hand “Ask the casualty if they are experiencing numbness or tingling, rings should be removed if possible

2) From the most comfortable position, have the casualty support the injured arm, holding it across the body with the fingers pointed at the opposite shoulder:

  • -Position the open triangular bandage under the injured arm, against the body. The point of the triangular bandage should extend past the elbow. The opposite, or bottom, end should be strait up and down on the body with the upper end over the shoulder.
  • -Take the bottom end of the bandage and place it over the opposite shoulder.

3) Tie the bandage at the back of the neck, making sure that the knot does not create any discomfort.

4) Twist the top of the point of the bandage.

5) Tie a broad bandage from the elbow on the injured side across the body “To secure the sling against the torso”

6) Recheck circulation

Tube Sling:

1) Check circulation by comparing the warmth and color of the fingers with the other hand “Ask the casualty if they are experiencing numbness or tingling, rings should be removed if possible

2) Put the forearm of the injured side across the chest, with the fingers pointed at the opposite arm.

3) Position the open triangular bandage over the forearm and hand. “The point of the triangular bandage should extend past the point of the elbow and shoulder

4) Support the forearm and carefully tuck the bandage under all the way from the hand to the elbow.

5) Carry the end of the bandage near the elbow around the back. “Twist the top of the point of the bandage near the elbow to secure the elbow from coming out of the sling”

6) Adjust the height of the sling to make sure it is supporting the arm. “Tie the ends together in the hollow of the neck on the uninjured side

7) Pad between the arm and the body, in the natural hollow with soft, firm material.

8) Tie a broad bandage from the elbow on the injured side across the body.

9) Recheck Circulation

How to help with a Bone, Muscle & Joint Injury:

1) Check the area, once the area is safe, Check the person and ensure the persons ABC’s are present “Airway / Breathing / CirculationREMEMBERWear gloves if available to avoid bodily fluids.

2) Call 911 and get an AED if you are alone, you suspect a Head / Neck or Spine injury, there is a motor vehicle collision, dangerous environment or the injured persons life could be at risk. “If you expect the ambulance to arrive shortly, keep the person still and do not splint the injury. If the ambulance can be delayed “Immobilize the injury in the position found” NEVER straighten a broken bone without medical assistance and expertise

3) Care for the Bone Muscle & Joint Injury by:

Always follow recommendations by your Emergency Response professionals and 911 Dispatch personnel. “Never endanger yourself or the victim, you may “not” need to move or roll the injured person”

  • – If there are other life threatening injuries, treat those first as quickly as possible with as little movement to the injured person.

a) Treat the injury using the “R.I.C.E” method

b) Cool the injured area for 20 minutes of every hour for the first 24 to 48 hours. If you use ice, put some sort of thin cloth or pad between it and the bare skin to avoid freezing the skin.

c) Elevate the injured are above the level of the heart if possible. “Often a position of comfort is more than enough to help alleviate pain and swelling

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd

#FirstAidCourseEdmonton #FirstAidAndBasicLifeSupport #BasicLifeSupport #BLS #BLSforHCP #BCLS #BCLSCourseEdmonton #ACLS #AdvancedCardiovascularLifeSupport #MFR #EmergencyMedicalResponder #ITLS #BoneMuscleJointInjuries #Sprain #Strain #Dislocation #Fracture #Splints #Slings #MuscleCramp

Bone, Muscle, & Joint Injuries “Part 3 Splinting”

Bone, Muscle, & Joint Injuries “Part 3 Splinting”

Our previous installments of Bone Muscle & Joint injuries focused on what to look for, now that we have discovered an injury we have some basic techniques to cover on “how to treat them” while you await an ambulance or while you are on rout to a medical facility. Always remember that “you may not have to move a patient” waiting for a Medical Professional may help minimize further injury.

Splints:

A splint is a device used for support or immobilization of a limb or injured body part. It can be used in multiple situations, including temporary immobilization of potentially broken bones or damaged joints and support for joints during activity.

  • Soft Splints – Blankets / Towels / Pillows / Bandages
  • Hard Splints – Wood / Tree Branch / Newspaper / Cardboard
  • Anatomical Splints – Use another marching body part for support
  • Slings – Upper limbs only, Uses the neck to support the arms weight.

How to apply a Splint:

1) Determine which type of “Splint” will help the casualty get the most comfort out of the least amount of movement of the injured body part. “Soft / Hard / Anatomical / Sling” Use what you have available. Your splinting material should be able to cover the injury both above and below with plenty of room to secure it in place.

2) Check for skin temperature & color below the injured area before and after splinting “check circulation“. The area should be warm, indicating good circulation. If the area is cold before splinting, “Seek Medical Attention Quickly“. If the are was warm before splinting and cold afterwards, the splint may be too tight. “Loosen it gently

3) When possible, splint the injured part in the position in which it was found. “Movement may increase pain and lead to long term damage or side effects“. Always consult a medical professional before moving a damaged body part.

4) For bone and joint injuries, immobilize the injury “above & below” the site of the injury. by using bandages / rope / belts to secure the splinting material in place.

How to help with a Bone, Muscle & Joint Injury:

1) Check the area, once the area is safe, Check the person and ensure the persons ABC’s are present “Airway / Breathing / Circulation REMEMBERWear gloves if available to avoid bodily fluids.

2) Call 911 and get an AED if you are alone, you suspect a Head / Neck or Spine injury, there is a motor vehicle collision, dangerous environment or the injured persons life could be at risk. “If you expect the ambulance to arrive shortly, keep the person still and do not splint the injury. If the ambulance can be delayed “Immobilize the injury in the position found” NEVER straighten a broken bone without medical assistance and expertise

3) Care for the Bone Muscle & Joint Injury by:

Always follow recommendations by your Emergency Response professionals and 911 Dispatch personnel. “Never endanger yourself or the victim, you may “not” need to move or roll the injured person

  • – If there are other life threatening injuries, treat those first as quickly as possible with as little movement to the injured person.
  • a) Treat the injury using the “R.I.C.E” method
  • b) Cool the injured area for 20 minutes of every hour for the first 24 to 48 hours. If you use ice, put some sort of thin cloth or pad between it and the bare skin to avoid freezing the skin.
  • c) Elevate the injured are above the level of the heart if possible. “Often a position of comfort is more than enough to help alleviate pain and swelling

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd

#FirstAidCourseEdmonton #FirstAidAndBasicLifeSupport #BasicLifeSupport #BLS #BLSforHCP #BCLS #BCLSCourseEdmonton #ACLS #AdvancedCardiovascularLifeSupport #MFR #EmergencyMedicalResponder #ITLS #BoneMuscleJointInjuries #Sprain #Strain #Dislocation #Fracture #Splints #Slings #MuscleCramp

Bone, Muscle, & Joint Injuries “Part 2”

Bone, Muscle, & Joint Injuries “Part 2”

Sprains, strains, dislocations and fractures are our main focus for this second installment of Bone, Muscle & Joint Injuries. A muscle cramp is not actually an injury, it is a painful condition that can be caused by heavy exercise or by staying in the same position for too long. You can help a casualty with cramps, sprains, dislocations & fractures by utilizing a very similar set of First Aid steps.

Muscle Cramp Assistance:

  • Rest “Have the casualty find a position of comfort”
  • Stretch “Massage and stretch the injured area with the cramp”
  • Change the positions of the injured area.

Bone, Muscle & Joint Injure Assistance:

R.I.C.E:

  • RestHave the casualty sit or lay in a position of comfort
  • Immobilize Use splints to help keep the injury in a neutral position”
  • ColdCold packs help reduce inflammation and swelling
  • ElevateA relaxed position slightly elevated will help ease swelling

Splints:

“A splint is a device used for support or immobilization of a limb or injured body part. It can be used in multiple situations, including temporary immobilization of potentially broken bones or damaged joints and support for joints during activity.”

  • Soft Splints – Blankets / Towels / Pillows / Bandages
  • Hard Splints – Wood / Tree Branch / Newspaper / Cardboard
  • Anatomical Splints – Use another marching body part for support
  • Slings – Upper limbs only, Uses the neck to support the arms weight.

How to help with a Bone, Muscle & Joint Injury:

1) Check the area, once the area is safe, Check the person and ensure the persons ABC’s are present “Airway / Breathing / CirculationREMEMBERWear gloves if available to avoid bodily fluids.

2) Call 911 and get an AED if you are alone, you suspect a Head / Neck or Spine injury, there is a motor vehicle collision, dangerous environment or the injured persons life could be at risk. “If you expect the ambulance to arrive shortly, keep the person still and do not splint the injury. If the ambulance can be delayed “Immobilize the injury in the position found” NEVER straighten a broken bone without medical assistance and expertise

3) Care for the Bone Muscle & Joint Injury by:

Always follow recommendations by your Emergency Response professionals and 911 Dispatch personnel. “Never endanger yourself or the victim, you may “not” need to move or roll the injured person”

  • – If there are other life threatening injuries, treat those first as quickly as possible with as little movement to the injured person.

a) Treat the injury using the “R.I.C.E” method

b) Cool the injured area for 20 minutes of every hour for the first 24 to 48 hours. If you use ice, put some sort of thin cloth or pad between it and the bare skin to avoid freezing the skin.

c) Elevate the injured are above the level of the heart if possible. “Often a position of comfort is more than enough to help alleviate pain and swelling

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

#FirstAidCourseEdmonton #FirstAidAndBasicLifeSupport #BasicLifeSupport #BLS #BLSforHCP #BCLS #BCLSCourseEdmonton #ACLS #AdvancedCardiovascularLifeSupport #MFR #EmergencyMedicalResponder #ITLS #BoneMuscleJointInjuries #Sprain #Strain #Dislocation #Fracture #Splints #Slings #MuscleCramp

Head & Spine Injuries – Part 4 “Shaken Baby Syndrome”

Head & Spine Injuries – Part 4 “Shaken Baby Syndrome”

For this section we will focus on Shaken Baby Syndrome, a very deadly outcome in many ways that can and should be preventable. During this emergency many questions will start to be asked, who is more likely to cause this men or women? who is to blame? what are the effects? How do we recognize Shaken Baby Syndrome? What age does a child stop being susceptible to Shaken Baby Syndrome? The first thing to remember in this situation is to be calm, be gentle and most of all just take a moment to breath.

Shaken Baby Syndrome is when a baby or child is forcefully shaken or has a repetitive forceful motion exerted against their head, neck or spine, this causes his or her fragile brain to move back and forth inside the skull. This causes bruising, swelling and bleeding on or against the brain or spine, it may even sever the spinal column leading to severe injury even death.

What to Watch for:

When a baby won’t stop crying, some people get so angry and frustrated that they “shake” the baby. This can cause fractures of the baby’s skull, ribs, arms or legs; heavy bleeding; bruising and brain swelling that can stop oxygen from getting to the brain.

Often there is no intent to harm the child, but Shaken Baby is one of the most common causes of infant mortality. It is also the most frequent cause of long-term disability in babies and young children.

Unfortunately Shaken Baby Syndrome may also cause long term brain damage that with one or more serious problems, such as: Seizures. A baby or child may have uncontrolled muscle movement and be unable to speak, see, or interact normally. Blindness or trouble seeing or hearing are also some known side effects of Shaken Baby Syndrome.

Ages Susceptible to Shaken Baby Syndrome:

  • Shaken Baby Syndrome can occur in babies and in children between the ages of birth and up to Five or Six years old. The majority of cases happen in babies less than six months old with new parents.

How To Help:

  • Many societies and organizations offer a series of violence-prevention education programs for adults, youth and children through local or even online training programs.

NEVER SHAKE A BABY OR A CHILD, NO MATTER WHAT!

The way to treat Shaken Baby Syndrome is to avoid it at all costs. To do this just remember the basics and what you can do to help keep “yourself” calm. If the baby is crying and you are unable to console or stop the crying:

  • – Place the baby on his or her back “In a safe place like their crib, bassinet or rocker
  • – Never leave the baby “untended” in a home by themselves
  • – Let the baby cry while you take a few deep breaths in a different room, or where you can just barely hear them. “Remember YOU are the key to stopping Shaken Baby Syndrome
  • – After a few minutes, try to console the baby again.
  • – If the baby is not able to stop crying within 30-40 minutes contact your local Medical Health Link for assistance. In Alberta, Canada the Health Link can be reached by simply dialing “811” and you will be connected to a Registered Practitioner Nurse that can help you.

Things to Remember!

  1. 1) Never Shake a baby or Child
  2. 2) Take a breather and place the baby or child in a safe place.
  3. 3) You are not alone, if you need help call “811” and talk though it.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

#FirstAidCourseEdmonton #FirstAidAndBasicLifeSupport #BasicLifeSupport #BLS #BLSforHCP #BCLS #BCLSCourseEdmonton #ACLS #AdvancedCardiovascularLifeSupport #MFR #EmergencyMedicalResponder #ITLS #HeadNeckSpine #SpineInjuries #Quadriplegic #HeadInjuries #ScalpInjuries #Concussion #ShakenBabySyndrome #WhipLash #ShakenBaby

Head & Spine Injuries – Part 3 “Concussion & Scalp Injuries”

Head & Spine Injuries – Part 3 “Concussion & Scalp Injuries”

As mentioned in the previous post, Head and Spine injuries are very common and can be fatal, those who also survive injuries from Head or Spinal injuries can have physical difficulties and problems from either brain or spine damage. But what happens if the injury is localized to just the head or scalp? What happens if the face or jaw are compromised from the injuries or damage? What issues can a Concussion cause in the short term and or long term?

A Concussion has had a long history of being misunderstood with many wives tales on how to treat and or fix it. Lets focus on what a Concussion actually is: A Concussion happens when a blow to the head or body “ie: whiplash, Shaken Baby Syndrome” causes the brain to shake inside the skull. This can result in bleeding and or swelling in or around the brain. A Concussion can be mild, serious or even somewhere in between.

Scalp Injuries we will also bring into this post as they often occur simultaneously with the head injuries. Scalps are very vascular and can bleed quite heavily and have hidden injuries under the hair or flesh. It is always recommended to consider Scalp injuries as a Head / Neck or Spine injury.

Causes Of Concussion’s & Scalp Injuries

  • -Forceful movements of the head
  • -Violent blows to the face or jaw
  • -Shaking “Shaken Baby Syndrome
  • -Motor vehicle collision
  • -Impact to the body and head

What to Look for: “Concussion

  • -Many times, if someone lose consciousness, it is normally only for a short period of time, although sometimes it lasts several minutes. It is a temporary condition.
  • -Phrases like “I blacked out” or “I saw stars” are common
  • -Victim may complain of confusion or even memory loss
  • -The majority of concussions do not result in any altered level or loss of consciousness.
  • -Head Injuries that may include scalp injuries or bleeding

How to help with a Concussion or Scalp Injury:

1) Check the area, once the area is safe, Check the person and ensure the persons ABC’s are present “Airway / Breathing / CirculationREMEMBERWear gloves if available to avoid bodily fluids.

2) Call 911 and get an AED if you are alone, you suspect a Head / Neck or Spine injury, there is a motor vehicle collision, dangerous environment or the injured persons life could be at risk.

3) Care for the Concussion or Scalp Injury by:

Always follow recommendations by your Emergency Response professionals and 911 Dispatch personnel. “Never endanger yourself or the victim, you maynot” need to move or roll the injured person”

  • – If there are other life threatening injuries, treat those first as quickly as possible with as little movement to the injured person.
  • – If you feel a dip, or a soft area or a piece of bone on the scalp, put gentle direct pressure on the wound with gauze and bandages to slow the bleeding “Direct Pressure / Pressure Bandages / Pressure Points“. Try to control the bleeding with pressure on and around the wound. Never press into a compromised scull or soft spot.
  • – Make sure you move the Head / Neck or Spine as little as possible, even slight movement may cause further injuries.
  • -Place your hands on both sides of the injured person’s head. Gently support the person’s head in the position in which you find it until EMS personnel arrive.
  • – If the injured person is wearing a helmet, leave it on unless it makes it difficult for you to ensure the ABC’s “Airway, Breathing, Circulation” are present.
  • -If the person is laying face down in water / mud or if their airway could be compromised due to their position or injuries, roll the person using the H.A.IN.E.S technique or with multiple partners use the “H.A.IN.E.S Log Roll“, insuring that you keep the head / neck & spine in a the position you find them even as you roll them. Never “straighten” an injured victim suspected of Head / Neck or Spine injuries.
  • -Continue care until further help arrives.

If the person vomits, carefully roll them onto one side to keep the airway clear.

  • -Check the Airway to make sure the person is still breathing. If they are not breathing “Start CPR” 30 Compression’s, 2 breaths for all age groups.

In any emergency just remember to Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

#FirstAidCourseEdmonton #FirstAidAndBasicLifeSupport #BasicLifeSupport #BLS #BLSforHCP #BCLS #BCLSCourseEdmonton #ACLS #AdvancedCardiovascularLifeSupport #MFR #EmergencyMedicalResponder #ITLS #HeadNeckSpine #SpineInjuries #Quadriplegic #HeadInjuries #ScalpInjuries #Concussion

Head & Spine Injuries – Part 2 “Moving a Person”

Head & Spine Injuries – Part 2 “Moving a Person”

As mentioned in the previous post, Head and Spine injuries are very common and can be fatal, those who also survive injuries from Head or Spinal injuries can have physical difficulties and problems from either brain or spine damage. But what happens if the person is in a dangerous location? Their laying face down in a puddle? or their airway could be obstructed? These scenarios can make the Head / Neck & Spine injury seem even worse. “Should I move them? Will I cause more damage to them? Will I paralyze them if I move them?” These questions will also weigh heavy on the situation that you find. You may “Not” have to move a person to assess their breathing, but “Life over Limb” has always been the motto to keep in mind during these dangerous scenarios. If the person dies from lack of breathing or other emergencies, then the spine was the least of their worries. One little rhyme you can remember is “Always Keep The Head / Neck & Spine, In A Strait Line, Hoping It’s All Fine” never try to move a person with Head or Spine injuries unless their life could be threatened.

Common Reason’s to move a Person

“You should always suspect a Head / Neck & Spine injury if the person has been subjected to an Impact / Speed or an Energy Forced against the body with motion, or if you find a unconscious victim from an unknown reason”

  • – Motor vehicle collisions on a busy highway
  • – Fire
  • – Wild animals
  • – Toxic gas or chemicals

“Always Keep The Head / Neck & Spine, In A Strait Line, Hoping It’s All Fine” never try to move a person with Head or Spine injuries unless their life could be threatened.

How to help with Head & Spine Injuries:

1) Check the area, once the area is safe, Check the person and ensure the persons ABC’s are present “Airway / Breathing / CirculationREMEMBERWear gloves if available to avoid bodily fluids.

2) Call 911 and get an AED if you are alone, you suspect a Head / Neck or Spine injury, there is a motor vehicle collision, dangerous environment or the injured persons life could be at risk.

3) Care for the Head / Neck & Spine Injury by:

Always follow recommendations by your Emergency Response professionals and 911 Dispatch personnel. “Never endanger yourself or the victim, you may “not” need to move or roll the injured person

  • – If there are other life threatening injuries, treat those first as quickly as possible with as little movement to the injured person torso.
  • – Make sure you move the Head / Neck or Spine as little as possible, even slight movement may cause further injuries.
  • -Place your hands on both sides of the injured person’s head. Gently support the person’s head in the position in which you find it until EMS personnel arrive.
  • – If the injured person is wearing a helmet, leave it on unless it makes it difficult for you to ensure the ABC’s “Airway, Breathing, Circulation” are present.
  • -If the person is laying face down in water / mud or if their airway could be compromised due to their position or injuries, roll the person using the H.A.IN.E.S technique or with multiple partners use the “H.A.IN.E.S Log Roll“, insuring that you keep the head / neck & spine in a the position you find them even as you roll them. Never “straighten” an injured victim suspected of Head / Neck or Spine injuries.
  • -Continue care until further help arrives.

If the person vomits, carefully roll them onto one side to keep the airway clear.

“How to Roll A Person with a Head / Neck or Spine Injury”

To “Log Roll” a person using the previously known as “H.A.IN.E.S Technique” is the best option using multiple First Aid respondents, the more people you have helping the easier it will be to keep a person’s Head / Neck & Spine in the position you found it. “NEVER” Straighten a person’s Head / Neck or Spine if they are bent in an awkward position, only straighten or move the person if their airway could be compromised or their life as a whole is in danger. To perform a log roll on a person you must first learn how to roll someone by yourself, this will make the “Log Roll” easier to accomplish once there are multiple people aiding the casualty.

H.A.IN.E.S – Stands For

  • High – Arm – In – Endangered – Spine

The H.A.IN.E.S technique is designed to keep the head, neck and spine in a relatively strait line as you roll the person over avoiding further damage or spinal injuries. As we may not know what caused the person’s injuries or emergency once the person is face down remember its often difficult to breath face down on the ground, rolling them over secures the airway and makes it possible to perform CPR or other life saving techniques.

To Roll a Person Over using the “H.A.IN.E.S Technique” :

1) Kneel Beside the victim and place the victims furthest arm from you above their head.”High – Arm” In Endangered Spine.

2) Place the arm closest to you against the victims side.

3) Cross the legs using the leg that is closest to you to overlap hooking the ankles.

4) Place a hand under the victim’s jaw using your thumb and index finger to grip the jaw firmly letting your last three fingers rest against the side of the neck. Slip your forearm under the victims shoulder to act as a lever.

5) Grip the victims belt by the hip with your remaining hand, if the victim is not wearing a belt grip the pant material firmly

6) In unison with both arms “Roll the victim slowly away from you keeping the Head, neck and spine in line. As you roll the victim notice that the head should be resting on the “High-Arm“. Once the victim is on their hip their own body weight should carry them over onto their back “Slow is smooth, and smooth is fast” Make sure to guide the head neck and spine down gently to the ground keeping them in line to avoid potential spinal injuries.

  • -Check the Airway to make sure the person is still breathing. If they are not breathing “Start CPR” 30 Compression’s, 2 breaths for all age groups.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

#FirstAidCourseEdmonton #FirstAidAndBasicLifeSupport #BasicLifeSupport #BLS #BLSforHCP #BCLS #BCLSCourseEdmonton #ACLS #AdvancedCardiovascularLifeSupport #MFR #EmergencyMedicalResponder #ITLS #HeadNeckSpine #SpineInjuries #Quadriplegic

Head & Spine Injuries – Part 1 “Causes & Prevention”

Head & Spine Injuries – Part 1 “Causes & Prevention”

Head and Spine injuries are very common and can be fatal, those who also survive injuries from Head or Spinal injuries can have physical difficulties and problems from either brain or spine damage. Paralysis “Quadriplegia, Paraplegia,” loss of motor skill or function, altered behavior & disorders are also included with damage of this nature. Even permanent disability is something we must consider in this post. The spine is the electrical transmitter through your body that carries the brains impulses and commands through out your organs, to disrupt this can have serious long lasting effects. Lets focus on common causes, prevention and a basic overview on how to help with Head / Neck & Spine injuries. One little rhyme you can remember is “Always Keep The Head / Neck & Spine, In A Strait Line, Hoping It’s All Finenever try to move a person with Head or Spine injuries unless their life could be threatened.

Common Causes

“You should always suspect a Head / Neck & Spine injury if the person has been subjected to an Impact / Speed or an Energy Forced against the body with motion, or if you find a unconscious victim from an unknown reason”

  • – Motor vehicle collisions
  • – Recreation or Contact Sports Injuries
  • – Falls
  • – Assaults or Violent Acts

Prevention:

  • – Always buckle up, “safety belts & restraints save lives
  • – Make sure car seats for Children are approved for your region.
  • – Sports protective gear should always be utilized when possible.
  • – Before you attempt a new sport or “stunt” check to see what the potential risks are to your own body. Many injuries can be avoided with some foresight.
  • – Protect stairways from small children with gates and keep well light.
  • – Consult the safety manual for any construction or work equipment that is new to you.
  • – Drink responsibly and never combine medications with alcohol.
  • – Always follow the directions on over the counter medications & prescription drugs.

“Many Head / Neck & Spine Injuries happen in water, to prevent this”

  • -Look before you dive, insure the water deep enough, some pools at hotels or at home may not be deep enough for diving.
  • – Enter unknown or dark / murky water feet first.
  • – Never swim alone, having a buddy will help reduce risk of accidental drowning.
  • – When your body-surfing / surfing or wake-boarding keep your arms in front of you to protect your head / neck and keep balance.
  • – Never combine drinking and boating, boats are still a motorized vehicle.

“Always Keep The Head / Neck & Spine, In A Strait Line, Hoping It’s All Fine” never try to move a person with Head or Spine injuries unless their life could be threatened.

How to help with Head & Spine Injuries:

1) Check the area, once the area is safe, Check the person and ensure the persons ABC’s are present “Airway / Breathing / CirculationREMEMBERWear gloves if available to avoid bodily fluids.

2) Call 911 and get an AED if you are alone, you suspect a Head / Neck or Spine injury, there is a motor vehicle collision, dangerous environment or the injured persons life could be at risk.

3) Care for the Head / Neck & Spine Injury by:

Always follow recommendations by your Emergency Response professionals and 911 Dispatch personnel. “Never endanger yourself or the victim, you may “not” need to move or roll the injured person”

  • – If there are other life threatening injuries, treat those first as quickly as possible with as little movement to the injured person torso.
  • – Make sure you move the Head / Neck or Spine as little as possible, even slight movement may cause further injuries.
  • -Place your hands on both sides of the injured person’s head. Gently support the person’s head in the position in which you find it until EMS personnel arrive.
  • – If the injured person is wearing a helmet, leave it on unless it makes it difficult for you to ensure the ABC’s “Airway, Breathing, Circulation” are present.
  • -If the person is laying face down in water / mud or if their airway could be compromised due to their position or injuries, roll the person using the H.A.IN.E.S technique or with multiple partners use the “H.A.IN.E.S Log Roll“, insuring that you keep the head / neck & spine in a the position you find them even as you roll them. Never “straighten” an injured victim suspected of Head / Neck or Spine injuries.
  • -Continue care until further help arrives.

If the person vomits, carefully roll them onto one side to keep the airway clear.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

#FirstAidCourseEdmonton #FirstAidAndBasicLifeSupport #BasicLifeSupport #BLS #BLSforHCP #BCLS #BCLSCourseEdmonton #ACLS #AdvancedCardiovascularLifeSupport #MFR #EmergencyMedicalResponder #ITLS #HeadNeckSpine #SpineInjuries #Quadriplegic

Burns – Part 3 “Thermal Burns”

Burns – Part 3 “Thermal Burns”

For our last portion of Burns lets reiterate “Burns are injuries to the body’s tissues caused by either chemicals, electricity, heat or radiation. As burns can come from so many different sources”, this final section will help you focus on the information and see that physical causes of burns or “Burns from an Energy Source“, are “easy“. Once you get the science of energy and how the damage to your body from Thermal Energy “Hot or Cold” is relatively similar in how we treat it. A little slogan to remember about Thermal Energy is “Hot is fast but Cold is Slow“, this little saying will help you see that if a burn from “heat” can happen fast, then we can treat it fast, but just like it takes a while for an ice cube to form “slow” that means that your body will likewise take damage from cold “Slowly“. Again This does not include Dry Ice or any other chemical, as chemicals have an MSDS and we will always refer to the Material Safety Data Sheet to ensure we use the correct methods of treating injuries caused by chemicals.

Within Thermal Burns or Thermal Damage from a heat source to your flesh there are normally 3 levels or degree’s that we will decipher. Just remember that Thermal energy in either direction Hot or Cold will result in levels of severity and symptoms that are very similar but on opposite ends of the spectrum “Fire / Ice“, Lets focus on Heat exposure for this article.

As your flesh heats up to levels where it can sustain damage, your tissue will naturally react as many other substances do when encountering a “Heat Source“. Your flesh will harden and trap the energy created by the Heat Source within it, as we have heard the saying “A burn will continue to burn even after the heat source has been removed.” The issue is not

“First Degree or Superficial burns”

  • -damage to the first layers of your tissue comes with redness, pain, possible swelling. Most commonly seen as light sunburn that comes with itching and tenderness of the flesh.

“Second Degree or Partial Thickness Burns”

  • -Damage to the second layers of flesh and tissues, often seen with cooking burns. Redness, Pain from mild to severe, Possible swelling and Blisters “Never Pop a Blister” are often symptoms with second degree or partial thickness burns.

“Third Degree or Full Thickness Burns”

-Damage to all layers of tissue and flesh, often seen with flash burns. Third degree or Full Thickness Burns may present with redness, pain mild to severe “May not be present at the wort part of the burn due to nerve damage“, swelling, blisters, charred or waxy white flesh, open wounds. Always consult medical professionals for third degree or full thickness burns as infection rates are dramatically increased.

Prevention:

“Thermal Burns From a Heat Source”

  • -Keep matches away from children.
  • -Store gasoline and other highly flammable liquids outdoors.
  • When you are cooking on the stove, turn the pot handles in and use only the back burners when possible.
  • -Keep the hot water tank temperature turned down to 49C (120F)
  • -Do not put water on a grease fire “Use baking soda
  • -Keep aerosol cans away from heat and open flames
  • -Make sure your fireplace has a sturdy metal screen. Keep flammable materials away from fireplaces.

“Electrical Burns”

  • -Keep electrical appliances away from water
  • -If an electrical cord is frayed, fix it or get rid of it
  • -If you have young children cover electrical outlets

“Lightning Strikes”

  • -As soon as you see or hear a storm, stop swimming and boating and get away from the water because water conducts electricity.
  • -Go inside the closest building. If there is no building nearby, get inside a car and roll up the windows.
  • -Stay away from the telephone “Cell phone“, except in an emergency. If you are caught outside stay away from telephone poles and tall trees.
  • -Stay away from farm equipment and small metal vehicles such as motorcycles, bicycles and golf carts.
  • -Stay away from wire fences, clotheslines, metal pipes and rails, and other things that conduct electricity.
  • -If you are with a group of people, stay several meters apart from each other

How to Treat a Burn: “Thermal – From a Heat Source

1) Check the area, once the area is safe, Check the person and ensure the persons ABC’s are present “Airway / Breathing / CirculationREMEMBER Wear gloves if available to avoid bodily fluids.

2) Call 911 and get an AED if the burn covers more than 10% of the body, the person is in a great deal of pain, there is charring on the wound, 3rd degree or the burn was caused by a chemical, electrical, radiation source or explosive.

3) Care for the burn by:

Always follow recommendations by your Emergency Response professionals and 911 Dispatch personnel. “Never endanger yourself and maintain a safe distance from the source of the burn & review the MSDS if available”

  • -Cool the Burn and affected area with cool running water for at least “10 to 20 minutes” Minimum 15 minutes for all chemicals to dilute, remove & neutralize the chemical reaction. “This includes powdered chemicals after you have brushed away the excess before washing away. Always remove clothing that has been exposed to chemicals to prevent them from sticking to the body**NOTE** Never remove clothing that has “become stuck or melted” to the skin as the skin may peal off with it, consult a physician instead.
  • -For 2nd & 3rd Degree burns with charring or blistering cool only a small area at a time, too quickly may cause the person to go into shock.
  • -For 2nd & 3rd Degree burns with charring or blistering If the burned area covers less than 10% of the persons body, cool the burn with running or standing water for at 10 to 20 minutes. If this is too painful or the area cannot be put in water, cover the burn with a cool, moist, sterile dressing or clean cloth to cool it.
  • -“DO NOT” try to clean a full thickness burn “3rd degree with charring or blistering”
  • -After cooling the burn, cover it loosely with a dry, sterile dressing, preferably non-stick gauze.
  • -Always Seek Medical Attention for further treatment of 2nd and 3rd degree burns with charring or blistering to avoid complications or infections.

As you can see, the treatment on burns in all 3 sections of this tutorial are the same. Once you master the First Aid technique on how to aid a burn caused from a heat source you can aid anyone who has been exposed to too much heat. Just remember that it does not matter what the name of the burn is, the treatments are often the same “Hot is Fast & Cold is Slow”. Cool Running Water for 10-20 Minutes for all burns and seek medical attention for 2nd & 3rd degree or if their injuries may worsen.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

#FirstAidCourseEdmonton #FirstAidAndBasicLifeSupport #BasicLifeSupport #BLS #BLSforHCP #BCLS #BCLSCourseEdmonton #ACLS #AdvancedCardiovascularLifeSupport #MFR #EmergencyMedicalResponder #ITLS #FirePit #FireSafety #WildFire #StopDropRoll #ThermalBurns #Burns #HeatStroke #HeatExhaustion #HeatCramps