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Concussion “Mild Traumatic Brain Injury” & Your Child

Concussion “Mild Traumatic Brain Injury” & your Child

What is a Concussion/Mild Traumatic Brain Injury?

A concussion, also called a mild traumatic brain injury, is a head injury caused by the brain being shaken around inside the skull after a direct blow to the head, or a sudden jerking of the head or neck when the body is hit. Your child does not have to pass out “lose consciousness” to have a concussion. Some children will have symptoms of a concussion, such as passing out or forgetting what happened right before the injury, but others won’t.

Common Causes:

  • Falls
  • Sports injuries “Impact
  • Physical Assault “Shaken Baby Syndrome
  • Motor Vehicle Collision

When should my child go to the hospital?

There is more risk of complications such as bleeding and / or swelling in the brain in the first 24 to 48 hours after the injury. However, complications can happen even weeks later.

  • Call 911 or Go to the Hospital immediately if:
  • Becomes less alert, won’t wake up, or is hard to wake up
  • Doesn’t want to eat or nurse
  • Loses a learned skill “for example: Toilet Training”
  • Cry becomes high-pitched or the cry changes
  • Is acting differently
  • Is cranky or fussy
  • Blood or fluid coming from the nose or ears, or bruising around the eyes or ears
  • Has or acts like he or she has a headache
  • Speech is slurred or has trouble speaking
  • Loss of vision, blurry vision, or double vision
  • Sudden weakness on one side of the body
  • More than 2 episodes of uncontrollable or forceful vomiting that won’t stop
  • Seizure activity “such as abnormal movements, loss of consciousness, convulsions or gazing distantly off without being able to be stimulated or respond”

What to Expect After the Injury:

– The First 48 Hours – Make sure someone stays with your child for the first 24 hours after the concussion.

Rest & Sleep

Try to get your child to rest for the first 24 hours, it’s one of the best ways to help the brain heal. “It’s OK to let your child sleep

You “Do Not” have to wake up your child every 2 to 3 hours in the first 24 hours. If the doctor has asked that you “Do wake them” your child should wake up easily and not show any of the warning sings previously listed.

Limit “visual stimulus”, reading, television, video games, etc within the first 48 hours. The brain “needs to rest” so that it can heal, extra stimulus may make the symptoms worse. It may also be advisable for your child to take time off from school.

Keep your child away from bright lights, loud noises or crowds for the first 48 hours, as these can make symptoms worse as well.

Diet:

After a concussion, start your child on clear fluids such as “water, apple juice, ginger ale” and slowly go back to a normal diet. The fluids will help replenish needed sugar levels and help stimulate brain function, as vomiting is common in the first 24 hours fluids help keep your child hydrated and make vomiting easier.

Managing Pain:

To manage the pain “Headache”, you can help your child take “acetaminophen “such as Tylenol” for pain, use the proper dosage for the age / size of your child ‘Directions will be on the back of the bottle” Talk to your doctor about using products with ASA or NSAID’s in them “such as Aspirin, Ibuprofen, Advil or Motrin” these medications can increase the risk of bleeding.

  • – The First 4 Weeks – The symptoms below are common after a mild brain injury. They usually get better on their own within a few weeks and should not last longer than a month.

Feeling tired “abnormal to the casualty”

Problems falling or staying asleep

Feeling confused, poor concentration, or slow to answer questions

Feeling dizzy, poor balance, or poor coordination

Being sensitive to light

Being sensitive to sounds

Ringing in the ears

A mild headache, sometimes with nausea and/or vomiting

Being irritable, having mood swings, or feeling somewhat sad or “down”

While your Childs Brain is Healing

Most children recover from the concussion. The symptoms can take days to weeks to go away. Your child should start to feel better within a few days and be back to normal within about 4 weeks.

If your child isn’t feeling better within a few days after the injury “See your Doctor”

Expect your child to feel tired as he or she becomes more active. Make sure your child rests as needed.

If you find your child’s cranky or has mood swings, “see your Doctor if your worried”

Some children may find it hard to concentrate while their brain is healing, so make sure your child goes back to their normal activities slowly. Go back to school for half days at first, and increase as tolerated.

Ask your doctor when its okay for your child to play sports again. “The brain needs time to heal”

If your child plays sports, make sure the coach/instructor/team-mates know about your child’s concussion. “Avoid further head injuries”

  • “Use medicine as prescribed” See your doctor if your child still needs pain medicine for a headache longer than 2 weeks after the injury.

If your child’s Symptoms get worse at any time or you notice new symptoms from the list above, or from the first segment, call your doctor or Health Link “811 in Alberta”. You can also call the “Health Link Alberta 24/7 if you have questions about concussion/mild traumatic brain injury or any of the information in this handout.

This information was taken From Alberta Health Services “Concussion (Mild Traumatic Brain Injury) Information slip.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

Sudden Medical Emergencies “Part 2 – Diabetes”

Sudden Medical Emergencies “Part 2 – Diabetes”

One of the most common forms of sudden medical emergencies is Diabetes, a diabetic emergency happens when the body cannot control the level of sugar in the blood. The blood sugar level may become too high “Hyperglycemia” or too low “hypoglycemia“. “Literally Diabetes means an imbalance in sugars“, this can alter the victims mental state, breathing rate, might feel or look ill or even appear intoxicated. Once you are able to recognize sings and symptoms the steps to help someone with Diabetes is quite simple.

To help someone who is a Diabetic or a potential Diabetic we should first look at some of the “potential causes“. These causes are a reference to the body’s imbalance between two or more factors.

Causes:

  • – Pregnancy
  • – Lack of Exercise or too much
  • – Imbalanced food intake “High sugar / fat diets
  • – Insulin production “Often organ damage / failure / Malfunction

Signs and Symptoms of Diabetes:

  • – Unusual thirst
  • – Frequent urination
  • – Weight change (gain or loss)
  • – Extreme fatigue or lack of energy
  • – Blurred vision
  • – Frequent or recurring infections
  • – Cuts and bruises that are slow to heal
  • – Tingling or numbness in the hands or feet
  • – Trouble getting or maintaining an erection

Prevention:

  • – Proper Nutrition
  • – Proper exercise
  • – Weight management
  • – Take your medications as prescribed
  • – Check your blood sugar often, especially if you are sick or not following your normal routine.
  • – Keep some quick sugar foods with you at all times.
  • – Lifestyle management

What a Diabetic Emergency looks like:

  • – Changes in the level of consciousness
  • – Changes in behavior, such as confusion or aggression
  • – Rapid Breathing
  • – Cool, sweaty skin
  • – Skin that is paler than normal
  • – Appearance of intoxication
  • – Feeling and looking ill

How to help a Diabetic: High or Low Sugars

1) Check the area, once the area is safe, Check the person and ensure the persons ABC’s are present “Airway / Breathing / CirculationREMEMBERWear gloves if available to avoid bodily fluids.

2) Call 911 and get an AED if you are alone, you suspect a Head / Neck or Spine injury, there is a motor vehicle collision, dangerous environment or the injured persons life could be at risk.

3) Care for the Diabetic casualty by:

Always follow recommendations by your Emergency Response professionals and 911 Dispatch personnel. “Never endanger yourself or the victim, you may “not” need to move or roll the injured person

  • – If there are other life threatening injuries, treat those first as quickly as possible with as little movement to the injured person.

a) If the casualty is conscious and knows its a diabetic emergency“, offer the person a sugary drink such as orange or apple juice. If the person’s condition improves, recommend he or she eat a complete meal to stabilize

b) If the casualty is unconscious” Perform a secondary survey and place the person in the recovery position, continue care until EMS personnel arrive. “Do not stick anything in the casualty’s mouth as they may choke or stop breathing

While you wait for an ambulance:

RECOVERY Position:

  • 1) Kneel Beside the victim and place the victims furthest arm from you above their head.
  • 2) Place the arm closest to you across the victims chest as a protector arm.
  • 3) The Key is in their Knee, bend the nearest leg up at the knee.
  • 4) Carefully slip your hand under the hollow of the victims neck to support the Head Neck & Spine, at the same time use your forearm by slipping it carefully under the shoulder for leverage.
  • 5) Place your free hand on the Key Knee and gently roll the victim away from you by applying steady pressure against the knee and shoulder at the same time. The victims head should rest on their raised arm.
  • 6) To secure the position pull the key knee further up and bring their protector arm out to use the elbow to stabilize the position.
  • 7) Check the Airway to make sure their still breathing.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

Assisting With Medications During First Aid

Assisting With Medications During First Aid

Should I give a medication to someone who asks for it? Should I help a person to take their medications? Should I keep extra medications in my first aid kit just in case? These questions are some of the more prominent questions we are asked in class as we instruct First Aid students on how to help with Medications during a First Aid situation.

To shed some light on Medication use in First Aid scenarios & according to the Alberta Occupational Health & Safety regulations First Aid attendants have very specific guidelines on what they can and should not do with Medications in First Aid.

To make this easy “In Alberta” First Aiders are “NOT Allowed” to diagnose, prescribe or administer “Giveany medication. However they are allowed to “Assist individuals with their “ownprescribed medication if the casualty identifies the medication on their own & is able to take it without assistance.

What does this mean about giving medications in an emergency? Simply put “you CAN Assist” but “you can NOT Give”. The victim must take the medications on their own and be of sound enough mind to understand the risks. This includes all over the counter medications and above counter medications.

To Assist With Medications:

  • -The ill or injured person must be conscious and able to understand the risks involved with taking a medication & be able to take it themselves “Self Administration
  • -The First Aiders Assistance should be limited to preparing the medication for the victim, this is restricted to but includes oral & auto-injected medications.
  • -The victim should be certain that nothing will interfere or react negatively with the medication and should follow the written instructions on the label / device.
  • -The Five Rights of Medications are met:
  1. 1) Right Person – If it is a prescribed medication the names match the person taking it on the label.
  2. 2) Right Medication – Use the appropriate medication for the situation “Read the Label
  3. 3) Right Amount – Follow directions on the bottle / device or package on how much the victim should receive
  4. 4) Right Time – Help the victim “Before they hit the Floor“, the victim must be conscious and able to understand how to use medications.
  5. 5) Right Method – There are only 4 ways a medication can get into your body “Injected / Inhaled / Ingested or AbsorbedRead the Label and follow the Directions carefully.

For medications in first aid kits just remember that medications are subject to the individual’s needs. This means that stocking a first aid kit with medications is not advised as each person has different requirements on medications and they should only take those that are prescribed for themselves or have the medication on them.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.

“Standard First Aid Level C CPR & AED” and Online First Aid Training at your fingertips.

“Standard First Aid Level C CPR & AED” and Online First Aid Training at your fingertips.

We are proud to have the opportunity to offer the new fully accredited “Online First Aid Training / Standard First Aid Level C CPR & AED”. This program is also known as “Blended Learning Standard First Aid Level C CPR & AED”. Here at Saving Grace we take great pride at keeping up to date on the newest teaching techniques that help save lives and also help save our students time.

The Canadian Red Cross has created this program to help improve the ease of access to students who are short on time, we do understand its difficult for many individuals to take “2 days” away from work.

We recommend that any student seeking an “Online First Aid Course” select a program that is fully Accredited through both your regional governing body for First Aid as well as Occupational Health & Safety. This will allow your certification to remain up to date and provide you with the most recent, and accredited form of First Aid training available.

Online First Aid Training offers a unique advantage by removing a large portion of “theory” from the in class portion and providing it on an “Online First Aid Training Video Class” that you can take part in offered through the Canadian Red Cross Campus. By removing the theory portion of the program from the instructors and placing it on an “Online First Aid Training Video Class” the student can gain the “exact” same information / training and crucial updates to keep your knowledge on track.

This class is broken down into 2 parts that can be completed by attending a 1 day 8 hour skill training / assessment and a 3-4 hour online training seminar through the Online First Aid Training Video Class at the Red Cross E-Learning Campus.

By having all Standard First Aid Level C CPR & AED students trained in the exact same manner and theory, we have seen an amazing improvement in course speed, knowledge and performance as students can work together on the same knowledge base without conflict of information.

Skills Gained in your Online Standard First Aid Level C Course:

– What First Aid Is and what we can do to help!

– EMS “Emergency Medical Services”

– The Role of First Aid attendant

– Liability “Laws within your local district”

– OHS Act’s and what that means to First Aid Providers

– Disease Transmission and Vaccinations

– PPE “Personal Protective Equipment” Gloves / Masks

– Check Call Care “The 3 Rules of First Aid”

– CPR on an ADULT / CHILD / INFANT

– AED’s “Automatic External Defibrillators”

– 2 Person Rescue “Benefits of Teamwork”

– H.A.IN.E.S Recovery Position

– Choking Adult / Child / Infant

– Med Assist “Should I give medications in First Aid?”

– CVD “Cardiovascular Disease /Heart attack & angina

– Stroke TIA “Trans ischemic Attack”

– Shock

– Secondary Survey “What to do while you wait for an ambulance”

– Wound Care

– Burns Hot vs Cold

– Environmental Emergencies “Hypothermia vs Heat Stroke”

– Bone Muscle & Joint Injuries

– Head / Neck & Spine Injuries

– Poisons “Using your Material Safety Data Sheet”

– Childhood Illness

– Keeping Children Safe

– Substance Misuse

– Insect Stings or Bites

– Animal Bites

– Diabetics

– Seizures

– Asthma

– Emergency Child Birth

– Miscarriage

– First Aid Kits “stocking your own”

To register for your easy access First Aid Course in Edmonton or Online First Aid Course known as “Blended Learning” Standard First Aid Level C CPR & AED feel free to visit our website and register. Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd

Taught Through:

Canadian Red Cross

– Online First Aid Course “Blended Learning”

– Online Standard First Aid Level C CPR & AED

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

Heart & Stroke Foundations “Standard First Aid BLS For Healthcare Provider”

We are proud to have the opportunity to offer the new fully accredited Heart & Stroke Foundations “Standard First Aid BLS For Healthcare Provider”

The Standard First Aid BLS for Healthcare Provider (C) course encompasses the full content of the Standard First Aid course and the additional course content of the HSF Basic Life Support (BLS) for Healthcare Provider (C) program. The addition of the BLS for Healthcare Provider (C) class is designed to teach a variety of health-care professionals how to recognize a number of life-threatening emergencies, how to provide CPR, how to use an AED and how to relieve choking in a safe, timely and effective manner.

By combining the Standard First Aid program and the Basic Life Support Program for Health Care Professionals, students can gain access to an in depth, knowledge based program dedicated to Nurses, Paramedics, Doctors and all who are first entering the Medical Professional World. Student work together by bringing their diverse health care professional knowledge / information / training and crucial updates to keep your knowledge on track and provide you the skills you need to save a life during a Medical Emergency.

For more details, click below! We look forward to seeing you!

Detached or Torn Nail, What should I do?

Detached or Torn Nail, What should I do?

You snag your nail on the car door, the bed frame, the corner of the coffee table “It can happen so quickly” or you absently chip you nail polish “Suddenly” your nail rips and your left with a torn nail, in some severe cases you can even separate a nail from your nail bed. Pain, discomfort and even blood loss can occur when you rip your nail either half way or completely off. “What should I do if my nail rips off? Should I rip the remaining torn nail off? How long doe a ripped nail take to heal?” Are some common questions we hope to address in this portion. As much as this hurts, be patient, the nail will heal if you take proper First Aid steps.

What causes a detached / torn nail?

It can be very painful to tear or rip your nail from the nail bed. A nail may separate from the nail bed “detach / rip” for many reasons including:

  • -Injuries – Separation caused by injury is common in people who have long finger or toenails. The nail may pry away from the nail bed when it is hit or jammed.
  • -Toe Stubbing – Severe or repetitive toe stubbing may cause a nail to detach. This is also common in athletes who wear shoes that do not have adequate space for motion.
  • -Fungal nail infections – When fungi invade a nail bed and the skin underneath the nail “nail bed”. Toenails are more commonly affected than fingernails, and symptoms include cracked, yellow, discolored, streaked, thickened, or spotted nails.
  • -Skin Conditions – Psoriasis
  • -Chemical Exposure – Some chemicals like “Nail Polish -Remover and even some soaps
  • -Medications – Chemotherapy or ant malarial medicines can cause nail detachment
  • Severe Illness

After a nail separates from the nail bed for any reason, it will “not” reattach. A new nail will have to grow back in its place. Nails grow back “slowly”. It may take up to 6 months for a fingernail and up to 18 months for a toenail to grow back.

Prevention

  • -File any sharp edges smooth
  • -Trim nails short “within 2 millimeters” of flesh to avoid snagging “To avoid ingrown toenails leave the inset of the toenail a little longer to keep the edge from curling inwards.
  • -Clean under the nails to remove dirt and fungus
  • If your nail doesn’t look right “Color, Shape, Ridges” talk to a physician as your nail growth pattern may help in other diagnoses.

How to Treat a Detached Nail

Once a nail has been torn or detached, there is little that can be done to replace or repair it.” The main concern is damage to the adjacent tissue like nail bed, flesh and bone. If there seems to be a significant damage to areas around the nail, then a visit to a physician is recommended.

First Aid treatment often helps relieve pain, promote healing, and prevent infection. Treatment may involve removing the nail, keeping the area dry to prevent infection, and waiting for a new nail to grow. Infections and other skin conditions that can cause the separation of nail should be seen by a physician.

Nail Semi Attached

Do not Rip the remaining Nail off” The remaining parts of the old nail will help protect the tender flesh underneath as your new nail begins to grow back. Ripping the excess flesh off may cause excess bleeding and damage to the nail bed.

1) Stop Bleeding – Apply direct pressure with a clean cloth or bandage until the bleeding stops.

2) If there is remaining nail, use nail clips or scissors to trim the loose nail as close to the remaining nail bed as comfortable. The old nail will fall off one the new nail takes its place.

3) Clean the wound with clean water, soak your finger or toe in cool water for 20 minutes after trimming the nail.

4) Apply a thin layer of petroleum jelly “Vaseline” and cover the area with a non stick bandage.

To Prevent Infection

Let the wound breath so that it may heal, “Wounds that remain covered even with antibiotic ointment may become infected due to the lack of oxygen” Change your bandages often to keep it clean and let the new nail grow.

  • -Soak your foot or hand in a solution of 5 g “1 tsp” of salt dissolved in 1 L “4 Cups” warm water for 20 minutes, 2 or 3 times each day, for the next 3 days. Reapply petroleum jelly, and cover with a fresh adhesive bandage.
  • -Keep the nail bed dry, clean, and covered with petroleum jelly and an adhesive bandage until the nail bed is firm or the nail has grown back. Apply a new adhesive bandage whenever the bandage gets wet, discolored, or contaminated.

Watch for signs of infection such as increased heat, redness, pain, tenderness, swelling or pus. Remove an artificial nail if it separates from the nail bed. If you leave it on, the long, artificial nail can tear the nail bed.

When to see a Physician

“Don’t hesitate to get professional help, chances of infection and doing more long term damage can outweigh not going in to a health care professional.”

  • -If you are not comfortable with trimming the nail yourself
  • -Have diabetes, peripheral arterial disease, or an immune system problem. These problems may cause reduced blood flow and loss of feeling in the feet. Untreated nail injuries can lead to infection, foot ulcers, gang green, and other serious problems.
  • -The finger or toe is deformed, which may indicate fracture or dislocation.
  • -The wound looks deep or long enough to need stitches
  • -The nail is “completely” torn off or partially cut off from a crush injury or cut
  • -Discoloration or a bruise under the nail covers more than a quarter of the nail or there is continuing, intense pain that feels like “pressure”.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

#FirstAidCourseEdmonton #FirstAidAndBasicLifeSupport #BasicLifeSupport #BLS #BLSforHCP #BCLS #BCLSCourseEdmonton #ACLS #AdvancedCardiovascularLifeSupport #EMR #EmergencyMedicalResponder #ITLS #TornNail

Should you drive an ill or injured person to the hospital?

Should you drive an ill or injured person to the hospital?

This question gets asked by students taking our first aid courses all the time, and we do see the conundrum that many face in an Emergency as Liability, distance, Time or even a persons life may be at stake. For these very reasons we have come up with the simplest way to look at it.

Try not to……, but if you do decide to take a person to the hospital we have included some steps to keep you and the patient safe. Lets call this “Stay & Play VS Load & Go”

Stay & Play = “Wait for an Ambulance

  • – Never drive an ill or injured person to the hospital if their condition is “Life Threatening” or spine related. The movement of being in a vehicle may adversely affect their injuries. You may not have to move the patient, your 911 Dispatcher will advise you on options you may have to secure the best medical aid given.

Load & Go = “Take them to a hospital

  • – For “Non-Life Threatening” injuries or illness.

Step #1 – “911 on Speaker Phone” – Have 911 on speaker phone so everyone knows what the dispatcher needs you to do. This will also let the hospital know you are coming.

Step #2 – “Take a Partner – Have a calm person drive while you continue care. Having a partner to help in an emergency setting can make all the difference. Emergencies can change.

Step #3 – “You Can NOT Speed – as your vehicle is not a designated emergency vehicle its lack of visibility and sirens will put you and others into danger if you attempt to break the rules of the road. Just remember, if you get there safely, the victim will too, Better safe than sorry.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

#FirstAidCourseEdmonton #FirstAidAndBasicLifeSupport #BasicLifeSupport #BLS #BLSforHCP #BCLS #BCLSCourseEdmonton #ACLS #AdvancedCardiovascularLifeSupport #EMR #EmergencyMedicalResponder #ITLS #DrivingToTheHospital

Wound Care – Part 1 “Bruises”

Wound Care – Part 1 “Bruises”:

Cuts, nicks, gashes, bashes, bruises and burns are very common injuries and there are many ways that they can happen. For this post lets focus on the basics of how to treat both minor and major wounds, we’ll provide simple steps to help guide you through treating most wounds that can happen in every day life. To begin lets go through some basic terms that you can run into like dressings or bandages and some some strait forward prevention ideas to help avoid injuries.

Dressings or Bandages

Dressings are pads or any material you can place on an open wound to help absorb blood and other bodily fluids to help prevent infection as well as build clots. Bandages are materials you can use to secure, wrap or cover a dressing. Combined they are used to control bleeding, apply pressure, provide support and to protect a wound from dirt or infection. Never remove a blood soaked bandage, always add more to boost the bloods ability to create clots, dressings in contact with the would should remain in place until further medical care arrives or is needed.

How Tight should a Bandage be?

Bandages put on too tightly have the potential to “Stop Blood Flow” this is a negative outcome and should be avoided as the limb below the bandage may become cold, numb or begin to turn blur or paler than normal “If this happens loosen the bandage”. “Apply Even Moderate Pressure” that does not prevent circulation. “Never apply a tourniquet without proper knowledge, training and guidance”

Prevention of Injuries Include:

  • -Developing safe play habits with both adults and children to prevent injuries “ie: running with sharp objects”
  • -PPE or Personal Protective Equipment such as helmets, knee pads, elbow pads and eye protection should be used when called for during sports activities such as skateboarding, biking, skating etc..
  • :-Follow safety procedures at work or play.

Bruises & How to help:

Bruises are a discolored area of the skin that is created when blood and other fluids seep into nearby tissues. Most commonly caused by sudden impacts, blows or force against the tissue.

What bruises looks like:

  • -Discolored tissue “purple, black, brown / yellow, red, or blue areas”
  • -Swelling
  • -Pain or tenderness

What to do:

  1. 1) Check the area, once the area is safe, Check the person and ensure the persons ABC’s are present “Airway / Breathing / Circulation”
  2. 2) Call 911 if you suspect the injuries could be severe.
  3. 3) Care for the Bruise by:
  • – Place a piece of cloth or fabric over the bruise
  • – Cool the area to reduce pain, inflammation & swelling by placing an ice pack or cooling pad over the fabric covered bruise.
  • – Continue to cool the wound for 20 of each hour for as long as needed to reduce pain. “Always keep the cloth between the ice and skin”

4) If the person experiences severe pain, cannot move the body part without pain, if you suspect internal bleeding or if the force causing the injury was enough to cause severe damage or bleeding “Call 911, get an AED, have the person rest & wait for medical aid”

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

#FirstAidCourseEdmonton #FirstAidAndBasicLifeSupport #BasicLifeSupport #BLS #BLSforHCP #BCLS #BCLSCourseEdmonton #ACLS #AdvancedCardiovascularLifeSupport #MFR #EmergencyMedicalResponder #ITLS #WoundCare #Bruises #Injuries

A.E.D’s “Automatic, External, Defibrillators” & What to do:

A.E.D’s “Automatic, External, Defibrillators” & What to do.

As technology in the medical industry increases we begin to see more and more devices, apps, services and tools used to help save lives during emergencies. The AED has been an invaluable tool in today’s emergency scene’s as it has the unique ability to “Reset” a heart with an abnormal rhythm. There are also a few Hollywood myths about AED’s that we should clear up so that using them becomes a little less scary, just remember “Its not like you see in TV, most of what you see on TV during an Emergency is dramatized to the highest form”.

To clear up a couple questions we get from our students, lets focus on what the AED is supposed to do. AED’s are designed to “Reset” a heart rhythm that is beating abnormally in 2 ways, 1 the heart is quivering like a bowl of jello “Fibrillation” and 2 beating wildly out of control “Tachycardia”. These are the 2 main problematic abnormal rhythms that the AED is designed to look for. Once it finds them it will deliver a “Small” amount of “Amperage” through the chest & Heart causing the heart muscle to contract suddenly. The electrical charge that passes through the heart muscle is designed to work with the heart muscle and “Reset” the rhythm. This may work the first time the victim is shocked or it may take several shocks, the key is to listen to the AED as it will “Talk to you” and guide you through what it wants.

-The amount of electricity that passes through the heart will be “Small” so will it blow you across the room if your accidentally touching the victim? “NO” The electricity does have the ability to reset a heart so….. “try not to touch them & STAY CLEAR!”

-Will the victim spasm wildly? “NO” the amount of electricity is small so you may only see a pectoral flex or slight quiver of their muscles. If they don’t spasm that is normal as many people don’t.

-Is there a recording device monitoring what I say hidden on the inside? “NO” the Public AED device is designed specifically to analyze the heart rhythm, there is no known recording device hidden on the public models. The “Medical AED’s” have a memory card to keep track of what the heart was doing during the emergency for Cardiologists to look over later for irregularities in the heart muscle.

HOW TO USE AN A.E.D “Automatic External Defibrillator”:

1) Open the Case

2) Turn on the AED

3) Listen & Do what it tells you to do “Follow the Diagrams”

***When the AED Prompts you to give a shock, Stand Clear and say LOUDLY “I’m Clear, Your Clear, Everybody’s Clear!” Make sure no one is touching the victim and press the SHOCK button to deliver the shock***

4) Continue CPR if the AED tells you too:

Things to consider:

-DON’T STOP CPR while the AED is being put on, you want to continue to pump blood and oxygen to the body, the AED will tell you when to stop.

-Use the Age appropriate pads for the person you are using the AED on. Adults have larger pads and children have smaller pads. There are normally “NO” infant pads in public AED kits. For infants use the Child pads and place the pads according to the Diagram. **If you don’t have the appropriate age group pad use what you have “Keep the heart /Center of the chest in between the pads” and deliver the shock as advised** “Any shock is better than no shock!!”

-Remove any clothing, hair or objects in the way of the pads like jewellery or medical patches. AED kits are normally stocked with a single disposable razor for chest hair if needed.Things like Pacemakers and Piercings you “Can Not” remove so put at least 1 inch distance between the object and the pad.

-Ensure that the chest is dry, wipe any beads of water or sweat of the chest and place the pads according to the design on them. The victim can be in a small puddle or snow bank, the electricity will not be redirected. If the puddle is big enough that you can make a “splash”, pull the victim to a dryer area and repeat the steps.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

#FirstAidCourseEdmonton #FirstAidAndBasicLifeSupport #BasicLifeSupport #BLS #BLSforHCP #BCLS #BCLSCourseEdmonton #ACLS #AdvancedCardiovascularLifeSupport #MFR #EmergencyMedicalResponder #ITLS #CPR #HowToDoCPR #CPRTutorial #WhatToKnowAboutCPR #AdultCPR #ChildCPR #HowToUseAnAED #AED #AutomaticExternalDefibrilator

Basic Life Support Provider CPR “AKA” Health Care Provider Level CPR

Health Care Provider Level CPR “AKA” Basic Life Support Provider BLS

Over the years of helping students get the training they need for the employment they require, we have had countless questions on whether or not someone needs the Health Care Provider level CPR also known as Basic Life Support Provider or the general public version of CPR. We understand the confusion as many societies offer their own version of the HCP Health Care Provider CPR course. The final decision on what course a student needs is what their governing society accepts.

The general public version of CPR-C helps anyone wishing to learn the benefit of life saving skills on all age groups and helps to prepare to help in life threatening emergencies while you wait for Emergency Professionals to arrive.

Some different characteristics of Basic Life Support Provider CPR or Health Care Provider level CPR are the Program is broken down into different sections that show: Compression’s, Breaths, Bag Valve Mask Techniques, teamwork and the difference between Adult, Child and Infant in dealing with Airway obstructions while addressing the Medical Professional’s skills and knowledge.

As a comprehensive Video Based Program that sets the standards on all CPR skills for Health Care Providers. Basic Life Support Provider previously known as BLS for HCP CPR & AED and before that BCLS for HCP’s CPR & AED challenges medical professional students on their knowledge and skills on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation. As of November 2017 new standards and skills have been available for all Health Care Professionals to with the most up to date techniques and training information.

This year the life saving medication assistance of Naloxone has been added, also known as Narcan (an anti opiate medication used to help those in danger of overdose). The benefit of high quality team work in performing CPR and in the use of AEDs “automatic external defibrillators.” The 2015 version of Basic Life Support Provider focuses on honing the art of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation on all age groups.

In Alberta, Canada the governing body Alberta Health Services along with Covenant Health and Canada Health have set the standard and requested that all Medical Professionals have the Exact Same Training. This means they prefer all students and employees to have the same high quality standard of training and skills to achieve the highest quality of resuscitation during a life threatening event. “If ALL health care Professionals have the exact same training the chance of resuscitation go up”

Alberta Health Services, Covenant Health, and Canada Health Recommend, Prefer and Request that all Medical Personnel have their Health Care Provider Level CPR known as Basic Life Support Provider training through the Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation to keep continuity.

Alberta Health Services is setting a standard for all Health Care Professionals, doctors, nurses, paramedics, massage therapists, dentists, pharmacists, nurses aids, nurses attendants, and all personnel working in medical facilities to have Basic Life Support Provider CPR or BLS CPR, previously known as Basic Life Support BLS for Health Care Provider HCP CPR. This will ensure that no matter your job title you have the skills to help during an emergency.

This excellent program is set on a Video Format and takes roughly 4 hours to complete. This new BLS Basic LIfe Support Provider program through The Heart & Stroke Foundation has attempted to set the standard that every school and every student gets the exact same high quality training.

Basic Life Support Provider or BLS previously known as Basic Life Support for Health Care Providers HCP CPR has been shown to provide exactly what Alberta Health Services and many other Health Service Canada centers require and now demand their staff have as training.

Our Basic Life Support Program is run through our Edmonton Location with many time slots to chose from. As Alberta Health Services also recommends that due to liability, if your BLS CPR or Basic Life Support for Health Care Provider certificate expires you should not be allowed to work until it is reactivated. For this reason Saving Grace Medical has extended our BLS program course dates as of October 1st to “Monday Through Saturday” and even on Sundays upon request for groups. There will be more Basic Life Support Provider CPR/AED Level C courses available for our students.

 We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

#FirstAidCourseEdmonton #FirstAidAndBasicLifeSupport #BasicLifeSupport #BLS #BLSforHCP #BCLS #BCLSCourseEdmonton #ACLS #AdvancedCardiovascularLifeSupport #MFR #EmergencyMedicalResponder #ITLS