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What is Impetigo?

What is Impetigo?

Impetigo is a bacterial skin infection often found on the face, bottom and hands caused by “streptococcus and Staphylococcus aureus AKA: staph” bacteria. It is commonly known as “school sores” because a majority of cases are in school-aged children. However, it can also affect infants, adults and adolescents.

Uncomplicated Impetigo does “not” cause permanent damage to the skin, but is “HIGHLY contagious.

What does it look like?

“Impetigo can easily be misdiagnosed on first glance as Hand Foot & Mouth or even Herpes”.

Impetigo occurs in two forms, blistering and crusted. In Blistering Impetigo the blisters arise on previously normal skin, and “rapidly” grow in size and number. The blisters quickly burst and leave slightly moist or glazed areas with a brown/yellow crust at the edge. The spots expand even after they break open and can be many centimetres wide. They sometimes clear in the centre to produce ring shaped patterns. They are “not” usually painful, but can be itchy.

Impetigo usually appears around the nose, mouth, and other parts of the face. It can also appear on any skin not covered by clothes, such as arms and legs. Impetigo may even appear on the groin or buttocks.

  • In severe cases of impetigo there may be swelling of the lymph glands in the face or neck, severe pain, worsening redness, weakness and fever. “Consult your physician immediately”

Crusted Impetigo has a thick soft yellow crust. Beneath this crust is a moist red area. Crusted Impetigo spots grow slowly and are always smaller than the fully developed spots of blistering Impetigo. They are “not” usually painful, but can be itchy.

Impetigo can occur on top of other skin conditions, particularly itchy ones. When the skin is scratched the infection can enter through the broke skin. Some of these conditions are atopic dermatitis “eczema”, scabies, insect bites and head lice.

In cases where a larger area of skin is affected, patience may also have a fever, swollen lymph nodes or feel generally unwell.

How is it diagnosed?

Your doctor may diagnose impetigo based on a visual inspection of the blisters/sores, or by taking a swab to test for bacteria and check which antibiotic to use. The result of the swab takes several days.

How is it treated?

Depending on how bad the infection is, your doctor may recommend the use of an antibiotic ointment or oral antibiotics in severe cases. Antibiotic ointment should be continued until the sores have completely healed. If oral antibiotics are given it is important to finish the whole course of treatment “usually 5 days” and not stop when the impetigo starts to clear. “The blemishes may vanish but the bacteria may remain”.

Sores should be cleaned every 8-12 hours “Soap and Water”, dried thoroughly and covered with a waterproof dressing. Bathing the blisters with salty water will help to dry them out “use saline solution or dissolve about half a teaspoon of salt in a cup of water”.

How is it Spread?

Impetigo is very easy to catch from other people! Impetigo is usually spread through direct contact with other infected people.

The Bacteria primarily enters through damaged skin. People with conditions causing long term damage to their skin, such as eczema or atopic dermatitis, are at greater risk of infection.

How can you avoid spreading the infection?

“While you have the infection”:

  • Sores should be kept clean and covered with a waterproof dressing to prevent them being touched or scratched.
  • Used dressings should be placed in a sealed bag and put in the garbage bin as soon as they are removed.
  • Hands should be washed thoroughly with soap and running water for 10-15 seconds after sores are touched or redressed.

Children with impetigo should be kept home from school or other group settings if their wounds cannot be kept covered until 24 hours after antibiotic treatment has been started, or until the blisters have dried out if antibiotics are not used.

Bedding “Pillow Cases” should be changed and washed each day.

To Prevent Impetigo children should be taught:

  • To wash their hands often with soap.
  • Not to scratch scabs or pick their nose.
  • Not to share their clothes, towels, pillowcases, or toothbrushes
  • To have scratches and cuts cleaned and covered

Parents should be careful not to allow items such as clothes, towels, bed sheets, razors or toothbrushes used by the affected person to be used by others. Other grooming items, such as nail scissors or tweezers, should be disinfected / washed thoroughly after each use.

School and Childcare Impetigo Prevention.

In addition to general hygiene measures, specific measures to prevent spread in schools and childcare include”

  • Teachers, children and families should understand the importance of hand washing, covering sores and staying home if sick.

Hand washing products “soap dispensers, running water and paper towels” should be available and accessible.

Activities should allow time for hand washing as part of routine practice “before eating and after going to the toilet”

Temporary exclusion from child care or school if their wounds cannot be kept covered until 24 hours after antibiotic treatment as been started, or until the blisters have dried out if antibiotics are not used.

Surfaces such as counters, desks and toys that come in contact with uncovered or poorly covered infections, should be cleaned daily with detergent, and whenever visibly contaminated.

Impetigo “is” dangerous for babies!

It is important for people with Impetigo to keep away from newborns and young babies. Newborn babies are particularly susceptible to impetigo and because their immune systems are not fully developed. This can lead to serious complications, if you suspect your newborn has Impetigo see your physician immediately.

In severe cases of impetigo there may be swelling of the lymph glands in the face or neck, severe pain, worsening redness, weakness and fever. If you or your child has these symptoms, see your physician immediately.

What is the public health response?

Impetigo does “not” need to be reported to Alberta Health Services. Public health units can advise on the control of outbreaks. Schools and Childcare settings must notify parents of students who have potential to contract Impetigo, Parents, Guardians and care givers should be made aware of signs and symptoms and treatment methods that are available to prevent the spread.

Group A streptococcal infection may lead to other rare conditions such as acute post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis 3-6 weeks after the skin infection, which is associated with antibodies produced to fight streptococcal infection. “Consult your physician”

  • In communities in “Australia” that have cases of rheumatic heart disease, episodes of acute rheumatic fever are thought to be triggered by impetigo as well as by throat infections with group A Streptococcus. In those communities prompt treatment and control of impetigo is an important part of preventing rheumatic heart disease.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

GOUT

GOUT

What is Gout?

Gout is a painful condition similar to arthritis involving the joints as the body is subjected to an imbalance of Uric Acid build up. The joints are the most commonly affected part of the body, especially the big toes and knee’s. When the big toes are involved it is known as “Podagra”. Uric Acid can also be deposited in the kidneys and urinary tract causing “Kidney Stones”, if left untreated this can also lead to “Kidney Damage”.

Progressive gout can cause bone deterioration and deformity of the extremities. When someone has many attacks over years, Tophaceous gout can develop. “Tophaceous Gout” means that a large amounts of Uric Acid crystals have accumulated into masses called “Tophi” aka “Toe-fi”. Tophi are visible and/or can be felt in the soft tissues over joints “Looking like large Cysts or Blisters on the joints”, this is especially common on fingers, hands, elbows, feet, and Achilles tendons. They can even have a white or yellow substance inside which could be drained when inflamed by medical professionals.

What causes Gout?

Gout is caused by a defect or damage to your renal system or commonly known as your Urinary System “Two Kidneys, Two Ureters, a Urethra and a Bladder”, this damage causes an abundance of “uric acid” to be formed. When we eat foods high in purines, the body breaks down the purines by creating uric acid, an over abundance of uric acid then can cause a painful condition involving the joints similar to arthritis as the body then accumulates uric acid unable to excrete it fast enough through normal bladder channels. About a third of those who produce high levels of Uric Acid will develop Gout, however it is not known why some people develop symptoms and others do not. Once the Uric Acid is in the blood stream it can form sharp, needle like crystals that are deposited in the joints, tendons, and surrounding tissues.

Risk Factors also include:

Etiology “the cause, set of causes, or manner of causation”

Obesity
High Blood Pressure

Pathobiology “The branch of biology that deals with pathology”

Injury or recent surgery
Fasting or Overeating “Irregular eating habits”
Consuming excessive amounts of Alcohol on a regular basis.
Diets high in meat, shellfish, and beverages sweetened with high-fructose corn syrup
Taking medications that increase blood levels of uric acid “Diuretics”

Pathology “the science of the causes and effects of diseases”

Renal Defect “Defects to your Kidneys, Uriters, Bladder or Urethra”

Diagnosis

Gout can be diagnosed by confirming and identification of monosodium urate crystals in synovial fluid of the affected joint or tissue. The Fluid is drawn from the affected joint to look for the uric acid crystals and often clinicians will treat the gout when there are both classic symptoms and high levels of uric acid in the blood. X-rays of the affected joint may also show calcium-containing crystal deposits in the cartilage and further options may be discussed with your physician on treatment.

Symptoms of GOUT

Symptoms of “Acute Gout” are sudden, severe joint pain with redness, swelling, and tenderness of the joint. The joint may feel quite warm to the touch and even throb.

Pain in your big toes
Pain in your knees, ankles, wrists and or elbows
Intense pain that strikes in the middle of the night “Knees and lower extremeties are often the first to strike”
Pain that occurs in flares: rapidly worsens, then starts to ease up in the joints.
Strange lumps and bumps around your joints
Kidney Stones
Distortion of joints along fingers and toes “Tophi Gout”

Complications

Rapidly progressing “Osteoarthritis” can occur due to wearing down joint cartilage, bone cysts or spurs, and even fractures may occur with prolonged gout flairs.

Pseudo gout – Like Gout, pseudo gout is a form of arthritis that cuases dudden joint pain and swelling. The “Pseudo” part means that it looks like something else. The term Pseudo Gout is used because this is very similar to gout, while gout is caused by “uric acid crystals” pseudo gout is caused by “calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate crystals CPPD. Though the two have similar symptoms, treatment is somewhat different.

Pseudo gout causes sudden attacks of joint pain, swelling, and warmth of the flesh in the affected area and even fever. The attacks can last for days to weeks. The knee is the most commonly affected but it can also affect the ankles, feet, shoulders, elbows, wrists or hands “any joint”. CPPD crystals can also be deposited in the joint cartilage and never cause symptoms.

Treatments of Gout

There is “no” treatment that can “completely” remove or prevent the formation of calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate crystals CPPD “The pain causing calcium crystals in the joints” caused by Pseudo-Gout . Treatments for Gout and Pseud-Gout are generally aimed at reducing pain, swelling and the cause.

– Medications –

Acute Gout – May be treated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs NSAIDS, cortico-steroids

– Colchicine – Often used by people who cannot tolerate NSAIDS. Colchicine can have significant side effects based on the dose used. These side effects include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and abdominal pain.
-Steroids “Prednisone” – Used in people who cannot take NSAIDS’s or Colchicine. Prednisone is associated with an increased risk of a recurrent gout attack.
-Other Medications like “Politicise “Krystexxa”, Probenecid, Xanthine oxidase inhibitors or Haloperidol “Zyloprim” or febuxostat “uloric” may be prescribed by your physician. Please consult your doctor for more information.
– Serum urate-lowering therapy “Talk to your physician about this option”

Prophylactic Therapy – “Medicine or course of action used to prevent disease”

Prophylactic Therapy is used to prevent or reduce the number of acute Gout attacks. It is used when someone has repeated gout attacks, or has already had joint damage or developed tophi.

Long-Term treatment is aimed at lowering the level of uric acid in the blood so that crystals do not form. Colchicine is often used at low doses for a period of time while drugs that lower uric acid levels are started. “Allopurinol” is one of the most commonly used long term drugs. Allopurinol prevents the formation of uric acid, however it can have side effects including “rash, low white blood cell counts, diarrhea and fever”.

For more information please consult your local physician for options that will suite you body’s needs.

Lifestyle

Obesity is a strong risk factor for developing gout or having an acute gout attack. This risk is especially high in those with known cardiovascular disease CVD.

Dietary changes can reduce the frequency of attacks

Reduce

– Avoiding “Red Meat”, including wild game
– Avoiding particular seafood especially “shellfish and large salt water fish”
– Decrease intake of “Saturated Fats”
– Reduce Alcohol Consumption – Alcohol especially “Beer” interferes with the body’s natural ability to eliminate uric acid from the body.
– Avoiding foods and beverages containing “high-fructose corn syrup”
– Joint immobilization – Patients may be advised to avoid weight bearing “walking or running” if the legs or feet are involved and to limit activity for a period of time to minimize pain and swelling. A splint may be used temporarily to limit movement.

Increase

– Increased dietary protein from “low-fat” dairy products
– Increase intake of “whole grains, brown rice, oats or beans
– Coffee Moderate use “may decrease blood uric acid levels”
– Vitamin C 500mg daily has a mild effect on lowering uric acid levels
– Cherries, blueberries, purple grapes, and raspberries have also been found to be beneficial at lowering uric acid levels and promoting a healthy renal system.
– Weight loss significantly reduces the risk of Gout

Support for Gout

For more information please consult your local physician or visit your local online medical group dedicated to Gout.

Click Here for more information

If your symptoms get worse at any time or you notice new symptoms from the list above, call your doctor or Health Link “811 in Alberta”. You can also call the “Health Link Alberta 24/7 if you have questions about C.Diff or any of the information in this handout.

“This material is for information purposes only. It should not be used in place of medical advice, instruction, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your doctor or appropriate healthcare provider.”

In any emergency just remember to Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today, Save a Life Tomorrow, let first aid training in Edmonton be your Saving Grace

Concussion “Mild Traumatic Brain Injury” & your Child

Concussion “Mild Traumatic Brain Injury” & your Child

What is a Concussion/Mild Traumatic Brain Injury?

A concussion, also called a mild traumatic brain injury, is a head injury caused by the brain being shaken around inside the skull after a direct blow to the head, or a sudden jerking of the head or neck when the body is hit. Your child does not have to pass out “lose consciousness” to have a concussion. Some children will have symptoms of a concussion, such as passing out or forgetting what happened right before the injury, but others won’t.

Common Causes:

  • Falls
  • Sports injuries “Impact
  • Physical Assault “Shaken Baby Syndrome
  • Motor Vehicle Collision

When should my child go to the hospital?

There is more risk of complications such as bleeding and / or swelling in the brain in the first 24 to 48 hours after the injury. However, complications can happen even weeks later.

  • Call 911 or Go to the Hospital immediately if:
  • Becomes less alert, won’t wake up, or is hard to wake up
  • Doesn’t want to eat or nurse
  • Loses a learned skill “for example: Toilet Training”
  • Cry becomes high-pitched or the cry changes
  • Is acting differently
  • Is cranky or fussy
  • Blood or fluid coming from the nose or ears, or bruising around the eyes or ears
  • Has or acts like he or she has a headache
  • Speech is slurred or has trouble speaking
  • Loss of vision, blurry vision, or double vision
  • Sudden weakness on one side of the body
  • More than 2 episodes of uncontrollable or forceful vomiting that won’t stop
  • Seizure activity “such as abnormal movements, loss of consciousness, convulsions or gazing distantly off without being able to be stimulated or respond”

What to Expect After the Injury:

– The First 48 Hours – Make sure someone stays with your child for the first 24 hours after the concussion.

Rest & Sleep

Try to get your child to rest for the first 24 hours, it’s one of the best ways to help the brain heal. “It’s OK to let your child sleep

You “Do Not” have to wake up your child every 2 to 3 hours in the first 24 hours. If the doctor has asked that you “Do wake them” your child should wake up easily and not show any of the warning sings previously listed.

Limit “visual stimulus”, reading, television, video games, etc within the first 48 hours. The brain “needs to rest” so that it can heal, extra stimulus may make the symptoms worse. It may also be advisable for your child to take time off from school.

Keep your child away from bright lights, loud noises or crowds for the first 48 hours, as these can make symptoms worse as well.

Diet:

After a concussion, start your child on clear fluids such as “water, apple juice, ginger ale” and slowly go back to a normal diet. The fluids will help replenish needed sugar levels and help stimulate brain function, as vomiting is common in the first 24 hours fluids help keep your child hydrated and make vomiting easier.

Managing Pain:

To manage the pain “Headache”, you can help your child take “acetaminophen “such as Tylenol” for pain, use the proper dosage for the age / size of your child ‘Directions will be on the back of the bottle” Talk to your doctor about using products with ASA or NSAID’s in them “such as Aspirin, Ibuprofen, Advil or Motrin” these medications can increase the risk of bleeding.

  • – The First 4 Weeks – The symptoms below are common after a mild brain injury. They usually get better on their own within a few weeks and should not last longer than a month.

Feeling tired “abnormal to the casualty”

Problems falling or staying asleep

Feeling confused, poor concentration, or slow to answer questions

Feeling dizzy, poor balance, or poor coordination

Being sensitive to light

Being sensitive to sounds

Ringing in the ears

A mild headache, sometimes with nausea and/or vomiting

Being irritable, having mood swings, or feeling somewhat sad or “down”

While your Childs Brain is Healing

Most children recover from the concussion. The symptoms can take days to weeks to go away. Your child should start to feel better within a few days and be back to normal within about 4 weeks.

If your child isn’t feeling better within a few days after the injury “See your Doctor”

Expect your child to feel tired as he or she becomes more active. Make sure your child rests as needed.

If you find your child’s cranky or has mood swings, “see your Doctor if your worried”

Some children may find it hard to concentrate while their brain is healing, so make sure your child goes back to their normal activities slowly. Go back to school for half days at first, and increase as tolerated.

Ask your doctor when its okay for your child to play sports again. “The brain needs time to heal”

If your child plays sports, make sure the coach/instructor/team-mates know about your child’s concussion. “Avoid further head injuries”

  • “Use medicine as prescribed” See your doctor if your child still needs pain medicine for a headache longer than 2 weeks after the injury.

If your child’s Symptoms get worse at any time or you notice new symptoms from the list above, or from the first segment, call your doctor or Health Link “811 in Alberta”. You can also call the “Health Link Alberta 24/7 if you have questions about concussion/mild traumatic brain injury or any of the information in this handout.

This information was taken From Alberta Health Services “Concussion (Mild Traumatic Brain Injury) Information slip.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

ACLS “AKA” Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support for HCP’s

ACLS “AKA” Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support for HCP’s

One of the new programs now being offered at Saving Grace Medical Academy is the ACLS Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support course taught through the Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation. One of the highest level’s of resuscitation available, ACLS Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support focuses on the systematic approach on high quality advanced emergency medical techniques. This program has been selected by Alberta Health Services as the standard for all “Advanced” medical professionals entering the emergency medical field.

This course offers a video-based and instructor led advanced course that expands on the Basic Life Support or “BLS” cpr skills for health care providers. Stressing the importance of continuous, high quality CPR, ACLS takes the Basic Life Support Training to the next level and brings out the importance of medical intervention during cardiopulmonary arrest along with immediate post cardiac arrest, dysrhythmia, coronary syndromes as well as stroke’s.

Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation’s ACLS course presents:

  • -Improved resuscitation science leading to a better patient outcome
  • -Simulations and scenarios based on realism
  • -Instructor’s with experience that can help adapt the program to local protocol’s.

Who can take this class?

– ACLS Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support is designed for advanced health care professionals who either direct or participate in management of cardiopulmonary arrest and other cardiovascular emergencies.

– EMS Emergency Medical Service Professionals, EMT’s / Paramedics.

– Emergency Medicine Professionals – Nurses / RN’s / LPN’s / Respiratory Therapists RT’s

– Intensive Care specialists – Doctor’s

– Critical Care Units

– Any employment that requires an “Advanced Medical Directives” such as physicians, nurses or paramedics.

“The Heart & Stroke Foundation recommends that only those who will use the skills of ACLS within their scope of practice take the ACLS course. All students who meet the prerequisites and successfully pass the ACLS course will receive a course completion card attached to your “HSF ID number”.

Course Content:

Recent scientific evidence has pointed a direction towards better content, while educational research has been led to improve design of the ACLS Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support Provider course. The ACLS course emphasizes 3 major concepts.

1) Crucial importance of High Quality CPR cardiopulmonary Resucitation

2) Integration of BLS Basic Life Support with ACLS interventions

3) Team Interaction and communication during resuscitation.

Students will practice the application of many skills in simulated cases and will practice both Team Leader and team member roles while practicing:

  • – High Quality BLS Basic Life Support CPR for HCP’s
  • – Airway management
  • – Systematic approach to scenario management
  • – Rhythm recognition “ECG”
  • – Defibrillation “AED Manual & Automatic”
  • – IV intravenous / IO intraosseous techniques
  • – Medication assist or admin
  • – Cardioversion
  • – Team Dynamics
  • – Trans cutaneous Pacing

Course Duration:

-New Students – 12 Hours (+-) 20 Minutes broken up into a 2 day 6 hour each program.

-Renewing Students – 6 Hours (+-) 35 minutes – Completed in a 1 day program.

“To qualify for a renewal you must complete the renewal program BEFORE your certificate expires” ACLS certification lasts for 2 years.

Here at Saving Grace Medical we hope that all this information helps you achieve a higher level of education and get the course you need when you need it. We look forward to hearing from you and helping you achieve the career you desire.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

Croup

Croup

Croup is a very common illness that affects children and has the potential to be mild in symptoms or even dangerous to life threatening if it goes untreated. Children from the ages of 6 months to 3 years have a chance of contracting “Croup” on average once or twice and can be linked to other “respiratory illness“. It is always a good measure for Parents and Guardians to take “all” respiratory illness” as serious and seek further medical advice, “We need to breath to live

Croup is an infection that causes swelling of the voice box “larynx” and windpipe “trachea“, making the airway just below the vocal cords inflamed, swollen and narrow. This makes breathing both noisy and difficult. There are two main types of Croup and as such must be seen as “Infectious

Different Types of Croup

 Viral Croup – This is the most common type of Croup and is the result of viral infection in the voice box or airway, Temperatures range from low fever to 39C/104F. Often Viral Croup will start with a cold that slowly turns into a “Barking Cough“. The child’s voice will become hoarse with noisy breathing “Stridor“.

“Stridor” is the coarse musical sound that comes with breathing through an inflamed-swollen airway. The danger of “Croup with Stridor sounds” is that the airway is continuing to swell. If this happens it may reach a point when your child cannot breath at all. “Stridor” should always be assessed by a physician to prevent the danger of a closed airway. Stridor is common with mild Croup and increases with activity or crying, however if Stridor persists while the child is resting, it can be a sign of severe Croup and you must seek medical aid. Stridor may also be a sign of a serous breathing problem such as Epiglottitis.

– Spasmodic Croup – This form of Croup is caused by a mild upper respiratory infection or even an “Allergy” normally no fever is present. This is the scariest form of Croup as it has a “sudden” onset and often presents in the middle of the night. The child will go to bed with mild “Cold” like symptoms then wake up gasping for breath with hoarse beathing, a barking cough and “stridor”. As the child’s effort to breath increases their energy levels will decrease, they may even stop eating or drinking and eventually become “too tired to cough”, if this is the case “seek medical attention immediately”

Treatments

“Always consult a medical professional before treating illness on your own, home made remedies may not have the desired effect and may make the illness-symptoms worse”

  • -If your child wakes up in the middle of the night with Croup, take them into the bathroom, close the door, then turn on the shower on the hottest setting “Do not put them in the shower“. The “Steam” from the shower over 15-20 minutes will help ease the symptoms as you sit in the bathroom with the child. “The child will still have the barking cough though“,
  • -For the rest of the night “and 2 to 3 nights after“, try to a “cold” water vaporizer or humidifier in your child’s room. Your child may have another attack of Croup even within the same night, if they do repeat the shower steam treatment. Steam almost always works, if it does not, try fresh night air and open up the window of their room “wide”. If the child still persists with coarse hoarse breaths and Strider contact your local Medical Professional.

“In Alberta Canada you can contact “811” to contact the Alberta Health Link, a Registered Nurse or Paramedic will help you with treatments and options, they may also refer to you to bring the child into a Hospital for treatment.”

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

First Aid Kits “Stocking List”

First Aid Kits “Stocking List”

One question that we get in our courses is “What should we put in our First Aid Kits?“, during any emergency a well stocked First Aid Kit can be the difference between life and death, infection control, stable spine and many more concerns. Emergencies are just that “Random“, so lets compile a stocking list for you to use in case you want to make your own First Aid Kit.

“Many prepackaged First Aid Kits are stocked for ease of use with a great selection of emergency supplies, you can normally purchase them at your local Safety Supply outlet, Pharmacy or even larger Chain Mega Stores.”

Where should I keep my First Aid Kit?

Best place to keep your first aid kit is in the kitchen under the sink or even in the bathroom. As many people seek sources of water during an emergency keeping your First Aid Kit where people go is a valuable resource. It is also recommended to keep an MSDS and an Emergency Response Plan in the same place you keep your First Aid Kit.”

First Aid Kit “Stocking List”

  • – Sterile gauze pads “dressings” in amall and large squares to place over wounds “6 each of the 2X2 and 4X4”
  • – Adhesive tape “Medical Tape 2 Rolls”
  • – Roller Gauze “2-4 Rolls”
  • – Triangular bandages “6 each” Good for slings and bandages.
  • – Adhesive Band-aids “various sizes” 12-24 each
  • – Scissors “EMS Grade if possible, Check Supply Sargent”
  • – Tweezers
  • – Safety Pins “X6”
  • – Ice Packs “X2”
  • – Hot Packs “X2”
  • – Nitrile Gloves “Not Latex” such as surgical or examination gloves
  • – Flashlight / Pen Light + extra batteries
  • – Antiseptic wipes, soap & hand sanitize
  • – Pencil & Pad
  • – Eye Patches or “4X4 gauze pad”
  • – Thermometer
  • – Pocket Masks & Barrier devices
  • – First Aid Manual
  • – Vaseline
  • – Ziploc Baggies 6X6 “X4”

“Spine Collars & Spine Boards are recommended in facilities with high impact machinery, equipment, tools, far distance from hospitals, veterinary outposts / training arena’s”

What is an Emergency Supply kit?

“An emergency supply kit is a kit that you can put together that has supplies ready for an emergency and can fit into a backpack or duffle bag so you can easily take them with you. Speed and ability to escape are the keys to this particular kit, they are recommended for homes that are prone to natural disaster or in high conflict areas”

Emergency Supply Kit “Stocking List”

  • – Four liters “One gallon” of water per person per day “Sealed unbreakable containers are best, swap water every six months” A portable survival water filter” you can find the survivalists water filter at many sporting goods stores.
  • – Packaged, canned or freeze dried food “Replace each year or before expiration date”
  • – Walking shoes, rain gear & a change of clothing
  • – Survival Blankets or compressed sleeping bags.
  • – First Aid Kit with Iodine, Polysporin, antiseptic wipes
  • – Toilet paper, bar of soap, toothpaste / brushes body wash
  • – Spare Cash
  • – Spare set of Car Keys
  • – A list of Family Doctors
  • – Family information: Such as medical conditions, members of the family, medical devices need ie:pacemaker.
  • – Photocopies of all important identification for you and your family, including health card numbers
  • – Special items for babies, elderly, or disabled household members.
  • – Cellphone & contact information for family and friends
  • – Directions to Hospital & 2 alternate safe locations known to all family members.
  • – Maps of your region
  • – Matches & Candles in a deep can that will burn for many hours
  • – Plant & Animal identification guide for your region

What should I keep for First Aid in my Vehicle?

“An Emergency Car Kit is always a great idea for those who find themselves traveling or commuting to work frequently. This will help prepare your vehicle with an easily accessible kit that may assist during a sudden emergency or break down”

Emergency Car Kit “Stocking List”

  • – A battery-powered radio & flashlight with extra batteries or is naturally chargeable”
  • – Survival Blanket
  • – Booster “jumper” cables
  • – Fire extinguisher
  • – First Aid Kit
  • – Bottled water & non-perishable high-energy foods “replace the water every six months with the food”
  • – Maps of your region
  • – A shovel
  • – Flares & Glow Sticks
  • – Tire repair kit / pump
  • – Matches & Candles in a deep can that will burn for many hours.

These kit “Stocking lists” are a good start to keeping your family prepared for emergencies. Many of the components can be easily purchased at your local Mega Mart, Sporting Goods Center and Pharmacy. For more information on what you can do to better prepare yourself and your family contact your local First Aid and Safety Training Schools.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

Sudden Medical Emergencies “Part 1 – Fainting”

Sudden Medical Emergencies “Part 1 – Fainting”

For this segment lets focus on the sudden loss of consciousness known as “Fainting” Passing out, Blacking Out, medically known as Syncope“. Fainting is a brief period of unconsciousness that happens when there isn’t enough blood flowing to the brain. This can cause a rapped decline in thought process, feeling dizzy or light headed which rapidly leads to a complete loss of consciousness.

To help someone who is about to faint or who has already fainted we should first look at some of the potential causes.

Causes:

  • – Pregnancy
  • – Standing / Sitting / Laying in one position for too long without moving.
  • – Pain
  • – Traumatic information, sights or experiences
  • – Heat
  • – Dehydration
  • – Lack of Food or malnutrition

Prevention:

  • – Watch for the warning signs of fainting, such as dizziness or nausea, and intense need to sit or lay down.
  • – Keep hydrated and nourished
  • – Wear loose clothing around the neck
  • – When standing up from sitting or laying down do so slowly

How to help with Fainting:

1) Check the area, once the area is safe, Check the person and ensure the persons ABC’s are present “Airway / Breathing / Circulation” REMEMBER – Wear gloves if available to avoid bodily fluids.

2) Call 911 and get an AED if you are alone, you suspect a Head / Neck or Spine injury, there is a motor vehicle collision, dangerous environment or the injured persons life could be at risk.

3) Care for the Fainting casualty by:

Always follow recommendations by your Emergency Response professionals and 911 Dispatch personnel. “Never endanger yourself or the victim, you may “not” need to move or roll the injured person”

  • – If there are other life threatening injuries, treat those first as quickly as possible with as little movement to the injured person.

a) “If you expect the ambulance to arrive shortly, or If the ambulance can be delayed” -Place the person in the recovery position so that blood can start flowing to the brain again and the airway stays open.

b) If the person is pregnant, has a history of heart disease, or has another serious illness, seek medical attention.

RECOVERY Position:

1) Kneel Beside the victim and place the victims furthest arm from you above their head.

2) Place the arm closest to you across the victims chest as a protector arm.

3) The Key is in their Knee, bend the nearest leg up at the knee.

4) Carefully slip your hand under the hollow of the victims neck to support the Head Neck & Spine, at the same time use your forearm by slipping it carefully under the shoulder for leverage.

5) Place your free hand on the Key Knee and gently roll the victim away from you by applying steady pressure against the knee and shoulder at the same time. The victims head should rest on their raised arm.

6) To secure the position pull the key knee further up and bring their protector arm out to use the elbow to stabilize the position.

7) Check the Airway to make sure their still breathing.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

Wound Care – Part 8 “Ear Injuries”

Wound Care – Part 8 “Ear Injuries”

For the 8th installment of Wound Care we will focus on Ear Injuries and the potential risks that may come with them, Ear injuries may look minor, but there may be some serious complications if they go untreated. Common questions we hear within our first aid course are “What if there’s an odd colored liquid coming from the ear? Should I pull something out of the ear if its lodged in place? Can bugs crawl into my ear while I’m sleeping? Lets focus on the basics and fill in the questions as we go….

Common Causes:

  • -Impact against the ear with any force
  • -Cuts or tears
  • -Head Injury
  • -Loud Noises “Explosions / Gun Shots / Machinery / Tools
  • -Objects or substances in the ear “May be lodged

Prevention:

  • -Wear PPE or Personal Protective Equipment when available
  • -During Sports activities wear a helmet if ones is recommended
  • -Proper hearing protection is recommended when around loud noises or equipment “Concerts / Lawn Mowers / Chainsaws

What it Looks Like:

  • -Blood or “Other” fluid from with the ear
  • -Hearing Problems “ringing in the ear or high pitch squeal
  • -Sudden pain in the ear that may be intense
  • -Swelling or deformity

How to Help:

1) Check the area, once the area is safe, Check the person and ensure the persons ABC’s are present “Airway / Breathing / Circulation” REMEMBER – Wear gloves if available to avoid bodily fluids.

2) Call 911 if you suspect the injuries could be severe like head neck or spine injuries, if their airway could be blocked or there is an impaled object in or near the ear, or if “the ear is leaking a clear fluid that dabs yellow on tissue” This may be an indicator of internal injury within the head “Seek Medical Attention Immediately” Also seek medical attention immediately if the ear injury is from an “Explosion” or “Diving” injury.

3) Care for the Ear Injury by:

**Foreign Object / Substance in the Ear with NO head and/or spine injury & the object looks like it can be easily removed**

4) if you can see the object and it looks easy to remove without causing further damage, remove it by tilting the head to the affected side, then gently tap above the ear to loosen the object.

5) Attempt to grasp the object “Tweezers may be needed” and put it out.

**If the person has a potentially serious head and or spine injury with blood or other fluid is in the ear canal or draining from the ear**

6) Led the ear drain. “DO NOT” apply direct pressure. “DO NOT” move the person if possible

7) Cover the ear “Lightlywith a sterile/clean dressing

8) Provide Continual Care until EMS personnel arrive.

“Always seek further medical attention with objects that have been Impaled into the Body.”

With any head injury it is always a good idea to seek further medical attention to avoid complications that may include the Head / Neck or Spine.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

Wound Care – Part 4 “Impaled Objects”

Wound Care – Part 4 “Impaled Objects”

With our fourth look into Wound Care will mainly focus on Impaled Objects and what we can do to help someone experiencing this type of emergency. If the “Object” that created the injury is stuck within the wound it is called an “Impaled Object“. This can be very painful, lead to blood loss, internal damage / bleeding, infection and many other complications. With an “Embedded or Impaled Object NEVER remove the object” leave the object in place for medical professionals to remove to reduce further injury. For this post lets utilize the information we have gained in previous clips to assess, evaluate and control the hazards and injuries associated with Impaled Objects.

Common Causes:

  • -Injuries from pointed objects like nails, glass, pens or needles.
  • -Unsafe play habits with long or pointed objects

Prevention:

  • -Wear PPE or Personal Protective Equipment when available
  • -Stay away from unfamiliar or wild animals
  • -Implement safe play habits with children and adults to avoid injuries such as “running with scissors”
  • -Wear Proper footwear outdoors at work or at play
  • -Nails sticking out from boards should be removed and sweep up broken glass either inside or outside “Animals and Children can easily be exposed to sharp objects hidden in grass”

What it Looks Like:

  • -An object sticking out of the body.
  • -Bleeding, depending on the size of the object and depth of penetration.
  • -Pain
  • -Shock

How to Help:

1) Check the area, once the area is safe, Check the person and ensure the persons ABC’s are present “Airway / Breathing / CirculationREMEMBER – Wear gloves if available to avoid bodily fluids.

2) Call 911 if you suspect the injuries could be severe or if there object is large, the person is impaled “Onto” the object, is in the chest, head or neck.

3) Care for the Impaled Object by:

  • **LEAVE THE OBJECT IN** it may be acting like a plug and preventing the victim from severe blood loss.
  • -Stabilize the object by putting bulky dressings around the object to prop it in its original position “Try not to move the object as much as possible” IF THERE IS AN ENTRANCE THERE MAY BE AN EXIT, check for an exit wound and stabilize like the first.
  • -Use long bandages or tape to keep the dressings in place securing the Object & dressings.
  • -With an Impaled Object it is important that the person “ALWAYS” seeks further medical attention and avoids removing the object themselves. The object should be removed by properly trained medical personnel.

As you can see the treatments for an Impaled object and a Puncture Wound are very similar.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

CPR “Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation” Adult & Child

CPR “Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation” Adult & Child

How to Perform CPR “Part 2 of 3”

In our last post we focused on the basic information you would need to know about CPR and how its performed. For this Post we will focus giving you the “Step by Step CPR Guide”. This guideline is for the “General Public” for the Health Care Provider we will have a post later on dedicated to the new standards set by ILCOR, The Heart & Stroke Foundation, and the Basic Life Support CPR-C for HCP’s Health Care Providers guidelines.

In any Emergency remember to:

1) Protect yourself “Make sure its safe before helping”

2) Call 911 “Get your Paramedic Partners going”

3) Don’t Waste Time “Each second without oxygen can cause brain damage, don’t waste it wondering what to do, just help”

If the person is “Not breathing” and has gone unconscious for any reason “START CPR, Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation”

CPR “Adult & Child”

1) Start CPR by:

– Place the hell of one hand on the middle of the person’s chest, place the other hand on top “Palm above Palm in the Center of the Chest”

– Push Hard / Push Fast “DO 30 Compression’s in a row” Allowing the chest to recoil or raise up to the top after each compression.

2) Give two Breaths by:

– If you have a pocket mask “Use it now” or:

– Open the airway by using the “Head-tilt / Chin lift technique

– Pinch the person’s nostrils closed.

– Take a normal breath

– Cover the person’s mouth with your mouth

– Give two breaths, taking about 1 second per breath with just enough volume to make the chest rise up.

3) If your breaths go in:

– Repeat the cycle of 30 chest compression’s and 2 breaths

– If your breaths do NOT go in: Repeat the cycle of 30 chest compression’s and 2 breaths.

4) Continue CPR until:

– The scene is no longer safe to be in

– More advanced care arrives.

– An A.E.D arrives and has told you to stop.

– You have become physically unable to continue.

– The victim starts to breath normally on their own.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.