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Health Care Provider Level CPR “AKA” Basic Life Support Provider BLS or BCLS

Health Care Provider Level CPR “AKA” Basic Life Support Provider BLS or BCLS

Over the years of helping students get the training they need for the employment they require, we have had countless questions on whether or not someone needs the Health Care Provider level CPR also known as Basic Life Support Provider or the general public version of CPR. We understand the confusion as many societies offer their own version of the HCP Health Care Provider CPR course. The final decision on what course a student needs is what their governing society accepts.

The general public version of CPR-C helps anyone wishing to learn the benefit of life saving skills on all age groups and helps to prepare to help in life threatening emergencies while you wait for Emergency Professionals to arrive.

Some different characteristics of Basic Life Support Provider CPR or Health Care Provider level CPR are the Program is broken down into different sections that show: Compression’s, Breaths, Bag Valve Mask Techniques, teamwork and the difference between Adult, Child and Infant in dealing with Airway obstructions while addressing the Medical Professional’s skills and knowledge.

As a comprehensive Video Based Program that sets the standards on all CPR skills for Health Care Providers. Basic Life Support Provider previously known as BLS for HCP CPR & AED and before that BCLS for HCP’s CPR & AED challenges medical professional students on their knowledge and skills on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation. As of November 2017 new standards and skills have been available for all Health Care Professionals to with the most up to date techniques and training information.

Over the last few years the life saving medication assistance of Naloxone has been added, also known as Narcan (an anti opiate medication used to help those in danger of overdose). The benefit of high quality team work in performing CPR and in the use of AEDs “automatic external defibrillators.” The 2015 version of Basic Life Support Provider focuses on honing the art of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation on all age groups.

In Alberta, Canada the governing body Alberta Health Services along with Covenant Health and Canada Health have set the standard and requested that all Medical Professionals have the Exact Same Training. This means they prefer all students and employees to have the same high quality standard of training and skills to achieve the highest quality of resuscitation during a life threatening event. “If ALL health care Professionals have the exact same training the chance of resuscitation go up

Alberta Health Services, Covenant Health, and Canada Health Recommend, Prefer and Request that all Medical Personnel have their Health Care Provider Level CPR known as Basic Life Support Provider training through the Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation to keep continuity.

Alberta Health Services is setting a standard for all Health Care Professionals, doctors, nurses, paramedics, massage therapists, dentists, pharmacists, nurses aids, nurses attendants, and all personnel working in medical facilities to have Basic Life Support Provider CPR or BLS CPR, previously known as Basic Life Support BLS for Health Care Provider HCP CPR. This will ensure that no matter your job title you have the skills to help during an emergency.

This excellent program is set on a Video Format and takes roughly 4 hours to complete. This new BLS Basic LIfe Support Provider program through The Heart & Stroke Foundation has attempted to set the standard that every school and every student gets the exact same high quality training.

Basic Life Support Provider or BLS previously known as Basic Life Support for Health Care Providers HCP CPR has been shown to provide exactly what Alberta Health Services and many other Health Service Canada centers require and now demand their staff have as training.

With thew new 2020 guidline updates there comes some amazing new information regarding “Team dynamics, Chest Compression Fraction and resuscitation outcomes” Be sure to ask your instructor for information on the changes.

We also have the new “Blended / Online BLS 60 – 90 – 120” options available for those who need to have a more in depth video tutorial. This option can accelerate your “In Class” session but comes with a comprehensive online video session that you will need to complete “prior” to your skill session.

Our Basic Life Support Program is run through our Edmonton Location with many time slots to chose from. As Alberta Health Services also recommends that due to liability, if your BLS CPR or Basic Life Support for Health Care Provider certificate expires you should not be allowed to work until it is reactivated. For this reason Saving Grace Medical has extended our BLS program course dates as of October 1st to “Monday Through Saturday” and even on Sundays upon request for groups. There will be more Basic Life Support Provider CPR/AED Level C courses available for our students.

Getting you the course you need, when you need it! We hope this has helped clear some information on standards set forward by Alberta Health Services.

We look forward to seeing you!

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn Basic Life Support Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

Sudden Medical Emergencies “Part 2 – Diabetes”

Sudden Medical Emergencies “Part 2 – Diabetes”

One of the most common forms of sudden medical emergencies is Diabetes, a diabetic emergency happens when the body cannot control the level of sugar in the blood. The blood sugar level may become too high “Hyperglycemia” or too low “hypoglycemia“. “Literally Diabetes means an imbalance in sugars“, this can alter the victims mental state, breathing rate, might feel or look ill or even appear intoxicated. Once you are able to recognize sings and symptoms the steps to help someone with Diabetes is quite simple.

To help someone who is a Diabetic or a potential Diabetic we should first look at some of the “potential causes“. These causes are a reference to the body’s imbalance between two or more factors.

Causes:

  • – Pregnancy
  • – Lack of Exercise or too much
  • – Imbalanced food intake “High sugar / fat diets
  • – Insulin production “Often organ damage / failure / Malfunction

Signs and Symptoms of Diabetes:

  • – Unusual thirst
  • – Frequent urination
  • – Weight change (gain or loss)
  • – Extreme fatigue or lack of energy
  • – Blurred vision
  • – Frequent or recurring infections
  • – Cuts and bruises that are slow to heal
  • – Tingling or numbness in the hands or feet
  • – Trouble getting or maintaining an erection

Prevention:

  • – Proper Nutrition
  • – Proper exercise
  • – Weight management
  • – Take your medications as prescribed
  • – Check your blood sugar often, especially if you are sick or not following your normal routine.
  • – Keep some quick sugar foods with you at all times.
  • – Lifestyle management

What a Diabetic Emergency looks like:

  • – Changes in the level of consciousness
  • – Changes in behavior, such as confusion or aggression
  • – Rapid Breathing
  • – Cool, sweaty skin
  • – Skin that is paler than normal
  • – Appearance of intoxication
  • – Feeling and looking ill

How to help a Diabetic: High or Low Sugars

1) Check the area, once the area is safe, Check the person and ensure the persons ABC’s are present “Airway / Breathing / CirculationREMEMBERWear gloves if available to avoid bodily fluids.

2) Call 911 and get an AED if you are alone, you suspect a Head / Neck or Spine injury, there is a motor vehicle collision, dangerous environment or the injured persons life could be at risk.

3) Care for the Diabetic casualty by:

Always follow recommendations by your Emergency Response professionals and 911 Dispatch personnel. “Never endanger yourself or the victim, you may “not” need to move or roll the injured person

  • – If there are other life threatening injuries, treat those first as quickly as possible with as little movement to the injured person.

a) If the casualty is conscious and knows its a diabetic emergency“, offer the person a sugary drink such as orange or apple juice. If the person’s condition improves, recommend he or she eat a complete meal to stabilize

b) If the casualty is unconscious” Perform a secondary survey and place the person in the recovery position, continue care until EMS personnel arrive. “Do not stick anything in the casualty’s mouth as they may choke or stop breathing

While you wait for an ambulance:

RECOVERY Position:

  • 1) Kneel Beside the victim and place the victims furthest arm from you above their head.
  • 2) Place the arm closest to you across the victims chest as a protector arm.
  • 3) The Key is in their Knee, bend the nearest leg up at the knee.
  • 4) Carefully slip your hand under the hollow of the victims neck to support the Head Neck & Spine, at the same time use your forearm by slipping it carefully under the shoulder for leverage.
  • 5) Place your free hand on the Key Knee and gently roll the victim away from you by applying steady pressure against the knee and shoulder at the same time. The victims head should rest on their raised arm.
  • 6) To secure the position pull the key knee further up and bring their protector arm out to use the elbow to stabilize the position.
  • 7) Check the Airway to make sure their still breathing.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn Basic Life Support Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

Bone, Muscle, & Joint Injuries “Part 1”

Bone, Muscle, & Joint Injuries “Part 1”

Sprains, strains, dislocations and fractures are all part of this portion of First Aid training as its such a common injury during almost any every day task. Slips, trips, falls, improper lift techniques or just plain accidents, your body can be subjected to twists, turns and impacts that can cause damage to almost any body part. In this portion it would seem that the amount of information can be staggering, but we can break it down into the basic groups on what we can do, what we should avoid doing, and what helps the victim feel the most comfortable during this injury.

What is it?:

  • Sprain – “The stretching or tearing of ligaments at the joints
  • Strains – “Stretching and or tearing of muscles or tendons from their natural position causing damage and pain
  • Dislocations – “An injury that moves a bone out of its normal position at a joint.
  • Fracture – “A break, chip, or crack in a bone. In an “open” fracture, the bone breaks through the skin, in a “closed” fracture, the skin is not broken.

Causes:

  • – Falls
  • – Awkward or sudden movements
  • – Motor vehicle collisions
  • – Direct blows to the body
  • – Repetitive forces, such as running “Stress fractures
  • – Contact or non-contact sports

Prevention:

  • – Always wear seat belts & shoulder restraints when your in a vehicle.
  • – Small children must be in an approved and properly installed child restraint system when in a vehicle “Car seat / booster seat
  • – During activities, wear the appropriate safety equipment correctly “Helmets, goggles & pads to help save you from injury
  • – Put non-slip adhesive strips or a mat in the bath to prevent falls
  • – Wear proper sports equipment to avoid injury
  • – Check water depth before diving
  • – Stretch before exercising
  • – Enter above ground pools always feet first
  • – Know your limits, when you are too tired or frustrated, take a break.
  • – Falls are the leading cause of injuries among the elderly. Reduce the risk with safety measures like “Good lighting, Sturdy railings, Non slip floors or rugs

In our next post on Sprains, strains, dislocations and fractures we will focus on what to do to help a person once the injury has occurred. Bone, muscle, and joint injuries are almost always painful. Without first aid, they can lead to serious injuries and even permanent disabilities. In some cases, they can be life-threatening.

Things to Remember!

1) Never Shake a baby or Child

2) Take a breather and place the baby or child in a safe place.

3) You are not alone, if you need help call “811” and talk though it.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

Burns – Part 1 “Fire Safety”

Burns – Part 1 “Fire Safety”

Burns are injuries to the body’s tissues caused by either chemicals, electricity, heat or radiation. As burns can come from so many different sources we will break them down into sections to help you see the vastness of information, but also brings to light how “easy” burns are once you get the science of energy and how the damage to your body from Thermal Energy “Hot or Cold” is relatively similar in how we treat it. A little slogan to remember about Thermal Energy is “Hot is fast but Cold is Slow“, this little saying will help you see that if a burn from “heat” can happen fast, then we can treat it fast, but just like it takes a while for an ice cube to form “slow” that means that your body will likewise take damage from cold “Slowly“. “This does not include Dry Ice, Please refer to Chemical Burns” One more question we get during this portion is “What is the most common cause of death during a burn?” The answer is always “Infection“, we will bring more light on why in the next posts associated with Burns.

Common Causes of fire in the home:

  • – Insecure combustible materials ie: gasoline, hair spray, oil
  • – Unattended Cooking, or cooking oils secured inappropriately
  • – Smoking in the home without securing “Butts” or Smoking in bed.
  • – Faulty Heating Equipment or electrical devices
  • – Fire Pits not secured or inspected properly
  • – Furnace & Fire Place chimney’s or flue not cleaned properly

Prevention:

“Always follow safety guidelines, many Fire preventing methods have been put together by Occupational Health and Safety and your local Fire Departments for your own personal protection.

  • – Store Chemicals / fuels / oils and compressed cylinders appropriately as stated in the MSDS or manufacturers specs.
  • Never Keep cooking oils “Above” the stove, if there is a fire on the stove this may act as an accelerant.
  • – Have fire pits inspected and licensed by your local licensing inspector to ensure your homes safety.
  • – Never keep your BBQ or other heat sources against a wall / siding or or other flammable materials.
  • – Have a plan, know your exits and help your family understand the benefits of an “Emergency Response Plan” play / practice them with children to keep everyone safe.
  • – Making sure you have working smoke detectors in the hallways near any sleeping areas, at the top of stairs, and in every bedroom. in some provinces and territories, legislation dictates where smoke detectors must be located.
  • – Never leave a fire pit / place unattended “Embers can reignite
  • -Ensure that Fire extinguishers are kept up to date

Fire Safety Tips

Fires are caused by numerous things found commonly in the home: Heating equipment, appliances, electrical wiring and cooking. Having a Fire Safety Plan or even an ERP “Emergency Response Plan” is always a good idea for any family.

Plan & Practice a fire escape route with your family by:

  • – Sketch a floor plan of your home that shows all the rooms, doors, windows, and hallways.
  • – Draw arrows that show how to escape from each room. If possible, show two ways to get out of each room. Planning to escape sleeping areas is most important because most fires happen at night.
  • – Plan where everyone will meet after leaving the building.
  • -Assign someone to call the fire department after leaving the burning building.
  • – When you travel, take a moment to find out the local emergency number and keep it on hand.
  • – If you stay in a hotel, learn escape routes and emergency procedures in case of a fire.

How to Escape from a Fire:

1) Check the area, if there is smoke, get low and crawl to get out of the building quickly, “Never return to a burning building” Make sure children are able to open windows, go down a ladder, or lower themselves to the ground. “Play / Practice with them

**NOTE**

  • – If you are unable to get out, “stay in the room“. Stuff towels, rags, or clothing around doors and vents. If you have access to water, wet the materials first.

2) Call 911 “Even if rescuers are already outside, tell the 911 dispatcher exactly where you are.

3) Care for yourself and family by staying calm, get low “Avoid Smoke“, get out by crawling. Follow your emergency response plan as best as you are able. Protect yourself “Never return to a burning building as you may be overcome by smoke, heat, or explosion.”

  • Always follow recommendations by your Emergency Response professionals and 911 Dispatch personnel.

If you are on fire “STOP, DROP & ROLL”

Fire Pit Regulations:

  • For General Purpose – Fire pits should be a minimum of 10 too 15 feet from any other potentially combustible material. A maximum of 2 feet tall, 3 feet wide, with the addition of an ash catch screen when possible. Water should be easily accessible within 20 feet and never use an ignition source such as gasoline to light a fire. For more information consult your local municipality on regulations, inspections and licensing for your own personal fire pit.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

Wound Care – Part 11 “Crush Injuries”

Wound Care – Part 11 “Crush Injuries”

To continue on with our Wound Care First Aid technique’s lets focus on Crush or Crushing Injuries. A “Crush Injury” occurs when there is a great deal of pressure on a part of the body or the body as a whole. This injury can be caused by numerous objects or even substances like “Grain in a Grain Silo, Sand, large heavy objects or even swaddling an infant to tight” . Grain Entrapment & Crush Syndrome are also something to consider as they are closely related to crush injuries and can be fatal, always take Crush Injuries seriously as there may be hidden or “Internal Injuries / Bleeding” that you may not be aware of.

Common Causes:

  • – Often caused by being squeezed between two heavy or immobile objects, or having a large amount of pressure forced against the body by an unmovable substance like grain or sand.

Prevention:

  • -Be familiar with your surroundings
  • -Be familiar with your equipment and get trained in its proper use.
  • -Make sure your equipment is in good, safe, working order.
  • -Follow safety procedures
  • STAY ALERT
  • -Never let children play around Grain Silos, Construction Sites, or Sand Pits

What it Looks Like:

  • -Person trapped or still being crushed under objects or between two objects.
  • -Possible wounds that look depressed or split at the edges.
  • -Deformity
  • -Signs of internal bleeding
  • -Shock
  • -Pain, tightness in the chest with shortness of breath.

How to Help:

1) Check the area, once the area is safe, Check the person and ensure the persons ABC’s are present “Airway / Breathing / CirculationREMEMBERWear gloves if available to avoid bodily fluids. **If the object or substance is crushing the persons head, neck, chest or abdomen or they can not breath “Remove it Immediately“, if the object is only crushing a limb “Leave the object where it is until EMS Personnel arrive.”**

2) Call 911 if you suspect the injuries could be severe, if there are airway could be blocked or there is excessive bleeding. Always call 911 for an crushing injury, there could be internal injuries that could lead to the situation becoming fatal.

3) Care for the Crush Injuries by:

***Only remove the object or the Victim from the object if their Airway could be compromised***

  • -Never Transport the victim on your own from a Crushing Injure, always wait for Advanced Medical Professionals to assist in removing the victim from the object or objects. The persons condition may worsen even after removing the object, this may lead to “Crushing Syndrome” and may be fatal. Always consult Medical Professionals.

“Crushing Syndrome”

Crush Syndrome is a compression of extremities or other parts of the body that causes muscle swelling and/or neurological disturbances in the affected areas of the body, this may lead to systemic manifestations or even systemic shock that can become fatal. Advanced Medical Professionals are always needed for Crushing Syndrome and should never be taken lightly. Amputation of the trapped body part may also be necessary, other injuries associated with Crushing Syndrome may include “Compartmental Syndrome

“Grain Entrapment”

Grain Entrapment is when a person is submerged under or partially submerged into a mass amount of grain “Fell in a grain Silo”. The movement of the grain can restrain the victim and make escape impossible without assistance, plus the added weight of the grain may prevent the victim from breathing and can lead to suffocation. For these reasons it is never permissible to allow children to play around grain silo’s and you should always use the buddy system to ensure there is a second way to escape.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

Wound Care – Part 9 “Infection & Disease Control”

Wound Care – Part 9 “Infection & Disease Control”

For the 9th part of Wound Care we will focus on Infections, Diseases and ways to prevent or control them once they have begun. “An infection is a condition caused by the invasion of the body by germ” these germs can be bacteria in nature or even viral. During our First Aid Course we run into many questions about infection & Disease Control, we consider disease control such a high priority that we even offer a course designed specifically to address Diseases “Blood-Born Pathogens”. During a First Aid we will advise all rescuers to “Consider ALL patients/victims as infectious” & always avoid bodily fluids during First Aid!

Common Cause’s of Infection:

  • -Foreign bodies like dirt, or other things containing germs that get into a wound

Routs of Entry for Disease:

  • -Direct Contact “When you touch the blood of someone infected
  • Indirect Contact When you touch something used by an infected individual
  • -Airborne TransmissionWhen an infected person sneezes, sending germs into the air and you breath them in
  • Vector-Borne When a mosquito bites an infected person then bites you, may even be referred to as zoonotic”

Prevention:

  • -Wear PPE or Personal Protective Equipment when available
  • -Always wash your hands before and after giving first aid.
  • -Whenever possible “WEAR GLOVES” avoid bodily fluids
  • -Use sterile dressings when caring for wounds
  • -“Keep your immunizations up to date” if you have a wound and have not received a “Tetanus” shot in more than “Five Years” seek medical attention. REMEMBER “Immunizations ARE beneficialIT IS A MYTH that immunizations cause birth defects.
  • -Use antibiotic ointment on a wound to help reduce risk of infection
  • -keep wounds clean

**HAND SANITIZERS** and alcohol rubs must NOT replace hand washing, if you use hand sanitizer its a good practice to wash your hands after the THIRD use!

What Infection Looks Like:

  • -Redness -Red Streaks moving away from the wound within the skin – Pus -Heat or warmth – Fever – Tenderness – Swelling – Nausea – Discolored flesh

How to Help:

1) Check the area, once the area is safe, Check the person and ensure the persons ABC’s are present “Airway / Breathing / CirculationREMEMBERWear gloves if available to avoid bodily fluids.

2) Call 911 or if you suspect the infection could be severe like meningitus, whooping cough or if the victim has a fever above 102F / 39C. Or if their airway could be blocked by mucus or an infected organ such as tonsils. “In Alberta you can call “811” as well to speak to a registered nurse for a consult, they may give you options or even recommend further medical attention.”

3) Care for the infection by:

-Keep the wound clean, if the infection spreads, changes color or begins to smell seek medical attention. Change bandages frequently and let wounds dry to reduce chance of infection.

**BABY OR CHILD WITH A FEVER OVER 30C (102F)**

  • -Young children or babies with a high fever can have seizures also known as “Febrile Seizures“. In most cases these are not life-threatening and they do not last long. To prevent “febrile seizures”
  1. 1) Give the child medication recommended by the child’s doctor to reduce the fever.
  2. 2) Give the child a sponge bath with water that is room temperature “Not icy cold
  3. 3) Provide continual care “Many Children may have a Febrile Seizure while sleeping and unattended

Sense these steps only “Temporarily” lower the temperature, seek further medical attention.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

Wound Care – Part 7 “Eye Injuries”

Wound Care – Part 7 “Eye Injuries”

Eye injuries will be the main focus of our 7th addition to “Wound Care” in this First Aid Blog. As we only have 2 eyes, and the fact that they operate one of our major senses, we should pay careful attention to what we can do as First Aid attendants in the presence of an Eye Injury. To make things easy, lets break it down into the basics like the other posts so that we can see what we can do, and give us some options. “Remember” eyes are a major organ and should not be treated lightly, “always seek a medical professional if your eyes have been injured, your vision changes or you have trouble focusing.” Any wound near the eye should be treated as an eye injury!

Common Causes:

  • -Objects or foreign particles lodged in the eye
  • -Impact to the eye by any force or object
  • -Radiation
  • -Burns / Flash burns
  • -Chemical Exposure

Prevention:

  • -Wear PPE or Personal Protective Equipment when available
  • -During Sports activities wear a face mask or eye protection
  • -Rotating tools should be inspected for wear and tear, lose objects may come lose and fly into the eye’s.
  • -Always review your MSDS and wear your PPE when working with chemicals.
  • -Get trained on all equipment at your place of employment to avoid injuries from misuse.

What it Looks Like:

  • -Pain and or irritation in the eye or eyes
  • -Redness
  • -Unable to open the eye
  • -Tears or watering of the eye
  • -Problem seeing properly
  • -Object lodged in the eye
  • -Deformities

How to Help:

1) Check the area, once the area is safe, Check the person and ensure the persons ABC’s are present “Airway / Breathing / CirculationREMEMBER Wear gloves if available to avoid bodily fluids.

2) Call 911 if you suspect the injuries could be severe like head neck or spine injuries, if their airway could be blocked or there is an impaled object in or near the eye, or if the eye is out of the socket..

3) Care for the Eye Injury by:

**Foreign Object / Substance floating in the eye**

  • -Try to remove the object floating in the eye by having the person blink several times. As the eye produces tears it may flush the object away.
  • -Clean away any dirt around the eye and then gently flush the eye with water, flush “AWAY” from the unaffected eye to avoid contaminating both eyes.
  • -If the object remains in the eye even after flushing the eyes seek medical attention right away to avoid further damage.

**Impaled Object in the eye**

  • -Get the person to rest as comfortably as possibly
  • -Leave the “Impaled Object” in the eyeNever remove an Impaled Object as it can cause more damage in removing it, leave removing of the object to a medical professional to avoid increasing the severity of the injury.
  • -Stabilize the object by placing bulky dressings around it being careful not to put pressure on the eye or against the object “Try not to move it as much as possible
  • -Use bandages to keep the dressing in place.
  • “Always seek further medical attention with objects that have been Impaled into the Body.”

Flash Burn:

If the eyes were damaged due to a “Flash Burn” (e.g.. From welding)

1) Cover the eyes with a cool, wet cloth

2) Seek further medical attention to avoid long term damage

With any head injury it is always a good idea to seek further medical attention to avoid complications that may include the Head / Neck or Spine.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

CPR “Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation “Infant / Baby”

CPR “Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation “Infant / Baby”

How to Perform CPR “Part 3 of 3”

“CPR on an Infant is Perfectly Safe! You will NOT hurt your infant, Not doing CPR may lead to the death of the Infant”

In our last post we focused on the basic information you would need to know about CPR and how its performed. For this Post we will focus giving you the “Step by Step CPR Guide”. This guideline is for the “General Public” for the Health Care Provider we will have a post later on dedicated to the new standards set by ILCOR, The Heart & Stroke Foundation, and the Basic Life Support CPR-C for HCP’s Health Care Providers guidelines.

Common Questions

  • Can CPR hurt my baby? – Answer = NO, CPR is perfectly safe, you will not hurt your child, Not doing CPR may lead to the death of the infant however.
  • Can I break ribs by doing CPR? – Answer = In an Infant it is “Rare” that you would break ribs, remember they are still developing and their bones are still somewhat pliable, be sure to push Hard and Fast to a depth of 1/3rd the depth of the chest and don’t stop until help arrives!
  • How much air should I give them? – Answer = While giving a breath by either “Mouth to Mouth or by using a pocket mask” remember to Head tilt Chin lift to a neutral position of the head that makes the infant look like they are “sniffing“, seal up your lips over both the nose and mouth and give a breath “just enough” to see a baby size chest rise. Stop when you feel resistance as the volume needed for an infants lungs is about the volume within your own mouth, also if you feel resistance check the mouth to see if there are obstructions, you may discover “why” your infant has stopped breathing, if you can see the object “Carefully remove itNEVER perform a blind finger sweep, you may push the object deeper and make the situation worse.

Emergency Procedures

In any Emergency remember to:

  1. 1) Protect yourself Make sure its safe before helping
  2. 2) Call 911Get your Paramedic Partners going
  3. 3) Don’t Waste TimeEach second without oxygen can cause brain damage, don’t waste it wondering what to do, just help

If the Baby / Infant is “Not breathing” and has gone unconscious for any reason “START CPR, Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation”

CPR “Infant / Baby”

  1. 1) Start CPR by:
  • – Place one hand on the forehead to maintain an open airway with a slight head tilt chin lift “like the baby is sniffing”
  • -Place 2 fingers on the middle of the chest just below the nipples.
  • – Push Hard / Push Fast “DO 30 Compression’s in a row at a rough depth of 4cm’s or 1 1/2 inch allowing the chest to recoil or raise up to the top after each compression.

2) Give two Breaths by:

  • – If you have a pocket mask “Use it now” or:
  • – Open the airway by using the “Head-tilt / Chin lift technique
  • – Seal your lips tightly over the baby’s “Mouth & Nose
  • – Give two “baby size” breaths, taking about 1 second per breath with just enough volume to make the chest rise up.

3) If your breaths go in:

  • – Repeat the cycle of 30 chest compression’s and 2 breaths
  • If your breaths do NOT go in: Repeat the cycle of 30 chest compression’s and before giving the next 2 breaths look into the mouth for obstructions. “Choking in infants is very common” remove the object if you see it then continue with 30 compression’s & 2 Breaths.

4) Continue CPR until:

  • – The scene is no longer safe to be in
  • – More advanced care arrives.
  • – An A.E.D arrives and has told you to stop.
  • – You have become physically unable to continue.
  • – The victim starts to breath normally on their own.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

ACLS “AKA” Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support for HCP’s

ACLS “AKA” Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support for HCP’s

One of the new programs now being offered at Saving Grace Medical Academy is the ACLS Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support course taught through the Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation. One of the highest level’s of resuscitation available, ACLS Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support focuses on the systematic approach on high quality advanced emergency medical techniques. This program has been selected by Alberta Health Services as the standard for all “Advanced” medical professionals entering the emergency medical field.

This course offers a video-based and instructor led advanced course that expands on the Basic Life Support or “BLS” CPR skills for health care providers. Stressing the importance of continuous, high quality CPR, ACLS takes the Basic Life Support Training to the next level and brings out the importance of medical intervention during cardiopulmonary arrest along with immediate post cardiac arrest, dysrhythmia, coronary syndromes as well as stroke’s.

Who can take this class?

– ACLS Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support is designed for advanced health care professionals who either direct or participate in management of cardiopulmonary arrest and other respiratory or cardiovascular emergencies.

-RN or higher

-Paramedic

-Physician

-RT – Respiratory Therapist

We are open for New Students looking to enter into the emergency rooms and learn this dedicated life saving course, or even those that are veterans of the emergency room looking to Re-certify their ACLS.

Short on time? Your certificate has expired? Ask us about getting your time in class reduced to only 1 day by blending your ACLS program.

We look forward to seeing you!

#ACLS, #AdvancedCardiovascularLifeSupport #HeartAndStrokeFoundation

Basic Life Support Provider CPR&AED “HCP” Heart & Stroke Foundation VS Covid-19

Welcome, we want to help, many students have asked us “Are you training in class? Is your school affected by the restrictions?”, Covid-19 has definitely changed many things in our world. Life as we knew it has literally been turned upside down for so many. Daycares were closed, Schools were closed, all major sporting events were cancelled. This impacted many things including your Pre-Requisite courses for Health Care Professionals, like the Standard First Aid or Basic Life Support Provider CPR class through the Heart & Stroke Foundation.

-GOOD NEWS-

We’re Still Open and Better than ever!

Saving Grace Medical Academy has been a long time supporter of education, to continue our goals of higher education we have moved into the “Fulton Place School” in support of Edmonton Public School Board. What better way to support education and our future than by supporting our very own local Edmonton Public School Board.

New Location

Fulton Place Edmonton Public School

10310 – 56 St NW, Edmonton, Ab, Ca

Classroom #2

Covid-19 had us closed for a few months at a time with each lock down, but it didn’t keep us down. We have new courses to help you get the education you need and certificates when you need them. If you are a #NursingStudent, #MedicalStudent ,#MedicalProfessional or any #HealthCareProfessional that is required to maintain Basic Life Support Provider CPR “BLS”, Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support “ACLS” or even Standard First Aid certificates for the Work Force, we have you covered.

As we continue to support education and our future health care professionals our primary in class training focus has been to provide Standard First Aid + BLS Provider training for the next level of future Nursing Students. This course is required for all students going into EMR, EMT, Nursing, and for practicum training with a current deadline of the end of August for your first semester.

While it may seem that training is scarce for BLS Provider, ACLS Provider, or Red Cross Standard First Aid we have not forgotten about you! Our class sizes are limited to ensure the safety of all in attendance and with this in mind we have the alternative online training methods (BLS Interim, ACLS Interim, and Red Cross Blended – Online Portion): any one of these classes will allow you to work (Occupational Health & Safety Approved) for 90 days as we work to get you in class, while doing our part to slow the spread of Covid-19.

In Class Training is still a GO!

We are now offering in class training for:

Heart & Stroke Foundation

  • Basic Life Support Provider CPR
  • Standard First Aid + Basic Life Support Provider

Canadian Red Cross

  • Standard First Aid CPR-C & AED “Blended 1 Day In Class Course”

Covid-19 Friendly Courses “Online Training”

To keep our students safe and continue to provide them the highest quality of training even during a pandemic, we are continuing to maintain our “Online Training Courses” so that if another lock down were to occur, our students can relax in safety from home and still receive the education they need!

Heart & Stroke Foundation

  • Basic Life Support Provider “Interim Online Class”
  • Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support “Interim Online Course”

Canadian Red Cross

  • Standard First Aid CPR-C & AED “Online”

The Pandemic VS Education

Many schools have been adversely affected by the Covid-19 Pandemic, with new social distancing guidelines, cleaning guidelines, isolation guidelines and lack of supplies to maintain proper sterilization equipment we understood why so many businesses, functions, social gatherings and schools had closed.

We support Edmonton Public Schools

We have new procedures, new courses, a new classroom and all the Covid-19 Pandemic supplies to maintain a cheerful, fun, educational and safe environment for Students of all ages

For more details on the courses we have to help you get back on track, please visit us at

SAVING GRACE MEDICAL ACADEMY

Getting you the courses you need, when you need them!