Category Archives: Uncategorized

The benefit of learning CPR

The benefit of learning CPR

Have you ever wondered at why taking a CPR class could be beneficial to you? Or, are you asking yourself “Why do I have to keep doing this class each year as a Health Care Professional?” These are a couple of the questions I get as a CPR instructor almost every day, and I’d love to help you.

As an Instructor for CPR and First Aid for the last 13 years, I have learned many things, I have had to unlearn some things I was taught “Not easy sometimes” as when your younger if your taught something in trust and take it as fact, its hard to change your mind. But I want to help, and show you the benefits of learning this life saving skill of CPR also known as Basic Life Support.

CPR is not just for Heart Attacks!

Cardiac Arrest, Respiratory Arrest, Neurological Failure or even systemic shock could lead you to end up doing CPR / Basic Life Support.

The biggest reason why I wanted to teach CPR myself was actually the loss of my Grandfather, he was “Dad” to me, a mentor, friend, and he raised me to be the person I am now. He is sorely missed. I’m hoping that I can help you avoid the same regret that follows unsuccessful CPR. The biggest factor in why CPR will not work? The time it takes for an ambulance to get to you, this is critical and “This is how he passed”, “it was down to time”, time to get to the hospital, time to get the paramedics, doctors, nurses involved, and even more time waiting for Stars to attempt an emergency evac for him. Sadly, the time it took for all of that was time Dad didn’t have.

Distance and time waiting for medical professional help”

  • This is the reason why you should learn CPR or even First Aid:

In the last couple years Medical Professionals in Canada have gone from high praise to low praise with the Pandemic and back again. The importance of these magnificent people can’t be stressed, enough they may not always be right “No mechanic always is” and these people have took it upon themselves to do this job not for the glorious amounts of money “which they don’t actually get”, but for the passion of helping others.

As an Ex EMT Paramedic myself, I have picked up body parts, delivered babies, helped people in their most critical moments of their life and even seen them pass. I learned that the job of a Health Care Professional is hard and comes with little benefits. It always seems like your there to late, and this is why I write this little post. Not to push anything, but to bring awareness and encourage you, the reader, to take charge of your medical future and give the best chance to those in need.

As medical professionals in Canada face a change in their system of operation, and budgets become an ever increasing fear and threat to the industry of saving lives. Taking the first steps to guard yourself against delays is only logical.

Provide yourself with the steps to ensure your own safety but the safety of others while you wait for a medical professional to assist you. Learn the signs and symptoms that are associated with Cardiovascular Disease, Mental Fatigue and illness, or even genetic disorders which could leave you predisposed to critical illness.

Currently, about 9 in 10 people who have cardiac arrest outside the hospital die. But CPR can help improve those odds. If it is performed in the first few minutes of cardiac arrest, CPR can double or triple a person’s chance of survival.This fact is taken directly from the CDC

If you can start CPR early, within moments, you can exceed the chance of survival by over %50 and give them that fighting chance. I see many people struggle with this after losing a loved one. Asking themselves what they could have, should have or might have done. The choice for me was to learn as much as I could after I went through this myself. I took it upon myself to teach others how to avoid this painful loss.

Knowledge is something that is always being shaped, learned, unlearned and refreshed. If you don’t use it you’ll lose it was how I was originally taught as a carpenter who turned into a Medical professional. The skills change, the knowledge changes, and how we teach the class changes to help better match with learning capabilities of students.

The CPR program from 5, 10 or 15 years ago is no longer the same.

Learn CPR Today with me at Saving Grace Medical Academy, and Save a Life Tomorrow yourself as you wait for EMS to help you and your loved ones escape disaster.

Cannabis – What is it & What does it do to my body?

Cannabis – What is it & What does it do to my body?

This post is a quick guide to help you understand the information that is being tossed out to the internet about Cannabis and understand the difference between true researched information and fiction. Questions you may have about Cannabis or Marijuana like “Can it Cure Cancer? Does it help with Seizures? Can you Overdose? What are the effects on the brain? Can I use it while pregnant? What are the effects on the body?.” These questions we’ll hopefully address and shed some light on the true nature of this versatile plant.

What is Cannabis?

Cannabis is derived from the Cannabis plant “Cannabis Sativa / Indica / Ruderalis” , it grows wild in many of the tropical and temperate areas of the world. It can grow in almost any climate, and is increasingly cultivated by means of indoor hydroponics technology. Cannabis must not get confused with Hemp, they are from the same plant family but are completely different in appearance, chemical make up, cultivation and application. Although they may look the same, Hemp completely lacks the psychoactive properties that Cannabis is known for. For more information on Hemp please visit https://ministryofhemp.com/hemp/not-marijuana/

The main ingredient in Cannabis is called “Delta-9 tetrahydro-cannabin”, commonly known as “THC”. This is the part of the plant that gives the “high” or psychoactive properties. There is a wide range of THC potency between cannabis products.

Cannabis is used in Four main forms “Marijuana”, Medical Edible Oil, hashish and hash oil. Marijuana is made from dried flowers and leaves of the cannabis plant. It is the least potent of all the cannabis products and is usually smoked or made into edible products like cookies or brownies. Hashish is made from the resin “a secreted gum” of the cannabis plant. It is dried and pressed into small blocks and smoked. It can also be added to food and eaten. Hash oil, the most potent cannabis product, is a thick oil obtained from hashish, it can also be smoked. Medical Grade Cannabis oil is generally ingested sublingual to absorb directly into the blood stream, it may also be put into foods and other products with a milder affect.

To achieve the desired affect or “High” that some patients are looking for, Cannabis is usually smoked in hand rolled cigarettes “Known as Joints” or special water pipes “Bongs” or even Vapes or Vaporized. These pipes or bongs can be bought or made, for safety reasons please consult your physician or local distributor.

Why do People use Cannabis?

Cannabis has many functions, primarily in previous years it has been used to experience a sense of mild euphoria and relaxation, often referred to as a “high”. However, this should not be confused as there is a difference in the types of plants that produce a compound called Cannabidiol “CBD” versus tetrahydrocannabinol or “THC”.

  • Consuming / Smoking cannabis with a mild to high level of THC causes changes in the user’s mood and also affects how they think and perceive the environment, e.g everyday activities such as watching the television and listening to music can become altered and more intense as THC acts as a psychoactive.

Short Term Effects of THC Include:

  • Feeling of well-being
  • Talkativeness
  • Drowsiness
  • Loss of inhibitions
  • Decreased Nausea
  • Increased appetite
  • Loss of Co-ordination “Slowed / altered Motor Skills”
  • Bloodshot eyes
  • Dryness of the eyes, mouth and throat.
  • Anxiety & Paranoia – Amplification of conditions like Schizophrenia

With current medical research CBD or Cannabidiol has been shown to act as a mild to high level analgesic and has properties that can benefit many medical conditions such as, fibromyalgia, muscular or skeletal including spinal damage, seizures, chronic pain and more. CBD has “No psychoactive properties” and will not make you high or lower your ability to function or operate machinery. For a more detailed list on what CBD may help with consult your local physician to see if its right for you.

CBD versus THC

As legal use of medical Cannabis and other products become more available you may have more questions like what is the difference between CBD and THC. Although they are similar even down to the same molecular structure “21 carbon atoms, 30 hydrogen atoms & 2 oxygen atoms” the “bioavailability” and your body’s way to process them is completely different. Your “Endocannabinoid system” also known as ESC is a biological system composed of endocannabinoids which are endogenous lipid-based retrograde neurotransmitters that bind to cannabinoid receptors “Works with your central nervous system, including the brain

“Despite their similar chemical structures, CBD and THC don’t have the same psychoactive effect.”

CBD – Medical Benefits

  • Seizure “Reduction in time & severity
  • Inflammation reduction
  • Cancer “Reduction in Pain or discomfort
  • Pain / acute or chronic reduction “Moderate form Analgesic
  • Inflammatory bowel disease “reduction in severity
  • Nausea “low form Antiemetic
  • Migraines “Reduction in time & Severity
  • Psychosis or mental disorder “Moderate Aid in reduction of anxiety / depression

THC – Medical Benefits

  • Glaucoma “Reduction of Intracranial Pressure
  • Cancer “Reduction in Pain or discomfort
  • Insomnia “Reduction in mucosal membrane production / Dry eyes
  • Low appetite “Increases appetite
  • Nausea “Moderate form Antiemetic
  • Muscle Spasticity “Muscle Relaxant
  • Anxiety “Reduces inhibitions
  • Pain “Low form analgesic

Side Effects

CBD is well tolerated, even in large doses. Research suggests any side effects that do occur with CBD use are likely the result of “drug-to-drug” interactions between CBD and other medications you may be taking.

THC causes temporary side effects as long as you continue to use THC products.

  • Increased Heart Rate
  • Coordination Problems “Slow Reaction Rate
  • Dry Mouth
  • Red Eyes “Dry eyes
  • Memory Loss
  • Impairment “Inability to judge distance and time
  • Anxiety / Paranoia increase “Schizophrenia like symptoms
  • Brain Development inhibitor THC is proven to reduce brain development in Children / Teens & adolescence leading to long lasting side effects and reduction in brain function
  • Addiction – THC “is” an addictive psychoactive substance that can lead to long term dependency and use. If you feel you ”Need” THC to cope or deal with life and consume it every day speak to your doctor about addiction counseling. The statement that many use is “I can quit any time I want, I just don’t want too. I don‘t need it I just prefer it

Questions & Answers

Does Cannabis cure cancer?

  • “No” Current Medical Research does not support the use of Cannabis as a “Cure” of Cancer. However Cannabis has been shown to greatly benefit the symptoms and discomfort associated with this ailment.

Can I smoke or use Cannabis while pregnant?

  • Do not Smoke or consume THC while pregnant, Smoking THC while pregnant “May alleviate nausea symptoms, reduce stress and discomfort on the mother”, however the smoke itself is harmful to the baby and will reduce blood oxygen ratio to the unborn child‘s brain, this will reduce central nervous system & brain development in their most critical stage. Smoking during Pregnancy of any substance increases the risk of SIDS “Sudden Infant Death Syndrome” and Brain Development Damage. THC will pass through the placental barrier and reduce brain development leading to long lasting side effects. The Canadian Medical Association strongly urges you “Do Not Smoke While Pregnant” of any substance. Consumption of CBD with “edibles / oils” during pregnancy at this time has no current medical side effects.

What age is safe to use Cannabis?

  • At this time medical research has proven that early consumption of THC can greatly impact brain development and psychological well being. THC has now been medically proven to reduce and permanently damage synaptic relay time, emotional regulation, as well as cognitive function and psychological well being. For this reason many countries that have legalized Cannabis use warn that age groups that still have brain development progress should avoid THC to avoid risk of Brain Development damage, for this reason Canada Health Advises “Don‘t use THC if you or your family has a history of psychosis, substance use disorders or other mental health problems“. Legal age in Canada for consumption of such substances is 18-21 depending on the province. Consumption of CBD at this time has no current medical side effects.

Can you overdose on Cannabis?

  • “Yes” you can Overdose quite rapidly if you are unsure of the quality, quantity or percentage of THC present in the Cannabis product you are consuming. Symptoms include Nausea, vomiting, light headed, shortness of breath, inability to focus, vertigo, tightness of chest, unconsciousness and more. The method of consumption also plays a factor on the length of time and severity of the overdose, currently common methods of consumption include inhalation “smoking / vaping / bong”, ingested “Edibles / Oils”, Absorbed “topical ointments”, Injected “Do not inject Cannabis” For these reasons please consult your physician and do not personally alter your dosage without consulting a medical professional. Consumption of CBD at this time has no current medical side effects or documented Overdose.

Can I drive after using Cannabis?

  • In Alberta Canada Cannabis use or “Mind Altering substance use” of any kind is strictly prohibited and Cannabis containing THC is “Banned” from being in cars or any motor vehicle, with the exception of those being used as a temporary residence, such as “parked” RV’s. As THC can alter your mood, reaction time, and consciousness “Do not consume THC and operate a vehicle of any kind” “Stay alive, don’t use and drive”

To answer more questions and go through the research provided above please visit https://aglc.ca/cannabis

There are many false articles circulating around the internet about Cannabis use and the interaction it has within your body. Please do your research, follow your medical professionals advice, and above all else do not buy or use illegally grown / sold or altered Cannabis.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn Basic Life Support Provider CPR Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

What is Impetigo?

What is Impetigo?

Impetigo is a bacterial skin infection often found on the face, bottom and hands caused by “streptococcus and Staphylococcus aureus AKA: staph” bacteria. It is commonly known as “school sores” because a majority of cases are in school-aged children. However, it can also affect infants, adults and adolescents.

Uncomplicated Impetigo does “not” cause permanent damage to the skin, but is “HIGHLY contagious.

What does it look like?

“Impetigo can easily be misdiagnosed on first glance as Hand Foot & Mouth or even Herpes”.

Impetigo occurs in two forms, blistering and crusted. In Blistering Impetigo the blisters arise on previously normal skin, and “rapidly” grow in size and number. The blisters quickly burst and leave slightly moist or glazed areas with a brown/yellow crust at the edge. The spots expand even after they break open and can be many centimetres wide. They sometimes clear in the centre to produce ring shaped patterns. They are “not” usually painful, but can be itchy.

Impetigo usually appears around the nose, mouth, and other parts of the face. It can also appear on any skin not covered by clothes, such as arms and legs. Impetigo may even appear on the groin or buttocks.

  • In severe cases of impetigo there may be swelling of the lymph glands in the face or neck, severe pain, worsening redness, weakness and fever. “Consult your physician immediately”

Crusted Impetigo has a thick soft yellow crust. Beneath this crust is a moist red area. Crusted Impetigo spots grow slowly and are always smaller than the fully developed spots of blistering Impetigo. They are “not” usually painful, but can be itchy.

Impetigo can occur on top of other skin conditions, particularly itchy ones. When the skin is scratched the infection can enter through the broke skin. Some of these conditions are atopic dermatitis “eczema”, scabies, insect bites and head lice.

In cases where a larger area of skin is affected, patience may also have a fever, swollen lymph nodes or feel generally unwell.

How is it diagnosed?

Your doctor may diagnose impetigo based on a visual inspection of the blisters/sores, or by taking a swab to test for bacteria and check which antibiotic to use. The result of the swab takes several days.

How is it treated?

Depending on how bad the infection is, your doctor may recommend the use of an antibiotic ointment or oral antibiotics in severe cases. Antibiotic ointment should be continued until the sores have completely healed. If oral antibiotics are given it is important to finish the whole course of treatment “usually 5 days” and not stop when the impetigo starts to clear. “The blemishes may vanish but the bacteria may remain”.

Sores should be cleaned every 8-12 hours “Soap and Water”, dried thoroughly and covered with a waterproof dressing. Bathing the blisters with salty water will help to dry them out “use saline solution or dissolve about half a teaspoon of salt in a cup of water”.

How is it Spread?

Impetigo is very easy to catch from other people! Impetigo is usually spread through direct contact with other infected people.

The Bacteria primarily enters through damaged skin. People with conditions causing long term damage to their skin, such as eczema or atopic dermatitis, are at greater risk of infection.

How can you avoid spreading the infection?

“While you have the infection”:

  • Sores should be kept clean and covered with a waterproof dressing to prevent them being touched or scratched.
  • Used dressings should be placed in a sealed bag and put in the garbage bin as soon as they are removed.
  • Hands should be washed thoroughly with soap and running water for 10-15 seconds after sores are touched or redressed.

Children with impetigo should be kept home from school or other group settings if their wounds cannot be kept covered until 24 hours after antibiotic treatment has been started, or until the blisters have dried out if antibiotics are not used.

Bedding “Pillow Cases” should be changed and washed each day.

To Prevent Impetigo children should be taught:

  • To wash their hands often with soap.
  • Not to scratch scabs or pick their nose.
  • Not to share their clothes, towels, pillowcases, or toothbrushes
  • To have scratches and cuts cleaned and covered

Parents should be careful not to allow items such as clothes, towels, bed sheets, razors or toothbrushes used by the affected person to be used by others. Other grooming items, such as nail scissors or tweezers, should be disinfected / washed thoroughly after each use.

School and Childcare Impetigo Prevention.

In addition to general hygiene measures, specific measures to prevent spread in schools and childcare include”

  • Teachers, children and families should understand the importance of hand washing, covering sores and staying home if sick.

Hand washing products “soap dispensers, running water and paper towels” should be available and accessible.

Activities should allow time for hand washing as part of routine practice “before eating and after going to the toilet”

Temporary exclusion from child care or school if their wounds cannot be kept covered until 24 hours after antibiotic treatment as been started, or until the blisters have dried out if antibiotics are not used.

Surfaces such as counters, desks and toys that come in contact with uncovered or poorly covered infections, should be cleaned daily with detergent, and whenever visibly contaminated.

Impetigo “is” dangerous for babies!

It is important for people with Impetigo to keep away from newborns and young babies. Newborn babies are particularly susceptible to impetigo and because their immune systems are not fully developed. This can lead to serious complications, if you suspect your newborn has Impetigo see your physician immediately.

In severe cases of impetigo there may be swelling of the lymph glands in the face or neck, severe pain, worsening redness, weakness and fever. If you or your child has these symptoms, see your physician immediately.

What is the public health response?

Impetigo does “not” need to be reported to Alberta Health Services. Public health units can advise on the control of outbreaks. Schools and Childcare settings must notify parents of students who have potential to contract Impetigo, Parents, Guardians and care givers should be made aware of signs and symptoms and treatment methods that are available to prevent the spread.

Group A streptococcal infection may lead to other rare conditions such as acute post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis 3-6 weeks after the skin infection, which is associated with antibodies produced to fight streptococcal infection. “Consult your physician”

  • In communities in “Australia” that have cases of rheumatic heart disease, episodes of acute rheumatic fever are thought to be triggered by impetigo as well as by throat infections with group A Streptococcus. In those communities prompt treatment and control of impetigo is an important part of preventing rheumatic heart disease.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn Standard First Aid + Basic Life Support Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

Concussion “Mild Traumatic Brain Injury” & your Child

Concussion “Mild Traumatic Brain Injury” & your Child

What is a Concussion/Mild Traumatic Brain Injury?

A concussion, also called a mild traumatic brain injury, is a head injury caused by the brain being shaken around inside the skull after a direct blow to the head, or a sudden jerking of the head or neck when the body is hit. Your child does not have to pass out “lose consciousness” to have a concussion. Some children will have symptoms of a concussion, such as passing out or forgetting what happened right before the injury, but others won’t.

Common Causes:

  • Falls
  • Sports injuries “Impact
  • Physical Assault “Shaken Baby Syndrome
  • Motor Vehicle Collision

When should my child go to the hospital?

There is more risk of complications such as bleeding and / or swelling in the brain in the first 24 to 48 hours after the injury. However, complications can happen even weeks later.

  • Call 911 or Go to the Hospital immediately if:
  • Becomes less alert, won’t wake up, or is hard to wake up
  • Doesn’t want to eat or nurse
  • Loses a learned skill “for example: Toilet Training”
  • Cry becomes high-pitched or the cry changes
  • Is acting differently
  • Is cranky or fussy
  • Blood or fluid coming from the nose or ears, or bruising around the eyes or ears
  • Has or acts like he or she has a headache
  • Speech is slurred or has trouble speaking
  • Loss of vision, blurry vision, or double vision
  • Sudden weakness on one side of the body
  • More than 2 episodes of uncontrollable or forceful vomiting that won’t stop
  • Seizure activity “such as abnormal movements, loss of consciousness, convulsions or gazing distantly off without being able to be stimulated or respond”

What to Expect After the Injury:

– The First 48 Hours – Make sure someone stays with your child for the first 24 hours after the concussion.

Rest & Sleep

Try to get your child to rest for the first 24 hours, it’s one of the best ways to help the brain heal. “It’s OK to let your child sleep

You “Do Not” have to wake up your child every 2 to 3 hours in the first 24 hours. If the doctor has asked that you “Do wake them” your child should wake up easily and not show any of the warning sings previously listed.

Limit “visual stimulus”, reading, television, video games, etc within the first 48 hours. The brain “needs to rest” so that it can heal, extra stimulus may make the symptoms worse. It may also be advisable for your child to take time off from school.

Keep your child away from bright lights, loud noises or crowds for the first 48 hours, as these can make symptoms worse as well.

Diet:

After a concussion, start your child on clear fluids such as “water, apple juice, ginger ale” and slowly go back to a normal diet. The fluids will help replenish needed sugar levels and help stimulate brain function, as vomiting is common in the first 24 hours fluids help keep your child hydrated and make vomiting easier.

Managing Pain:

To manage the pain “Headache”, you can help your child take “acetaminophen “such as Tylenol” for pain, use the proper dosage for the age / size of your child ‘Directions will be on the back of the bottle” Talk to your doctor about using products with ASA or NSAID’s in them “such as Aspirin, Ibuprofen, Advil or Motrin” these medications can increase the risk of bleeding.

  • – The First 4 Weeks – The symptoms below are common after a mild brain injury. They usually get better on their own within a few weeks and should not last longer than a month.

Feeling tired “abnormal to the casualty”

Problems falling or staying asleep

Feeling confused, poor concentration, or slow to answer questions

Feeling dizzy, poor balance, or poor coordination

Being sensitive to light

Being sensitive to sounds

Ringing in the ears

A mild headache, sometimes with nausea and/or vomiting

Being irritable, having mood swings, or feeling somewhat sad or “down”

While your Childs Brain is Healing

Most children recover from the concussion. The symptoms can take days to weeks to go away. Your child should start to feel better within a few days and be back to normal within about 4 weeks.

If your child isn’t feeling better within a few days after the injury “See your Doctor”

Expect your child to feel tired as he or she becomes more active. Make sure your child rests as needed.

If you find your child’s cranky or has mood swings, “see your Doctor if your worried”

Some children may find it hard to concentrate while their brain is healing, so make sure your child goes back to their normal activities slowly. Go back to school for half days at first, and increase as tolerated.

Ask your doctor when its okay for your child to play sports again. “The brain needs time to heal”

If your child plays sports, make sure the coach/instructor/team-mates know about your child’s concussion. “Avoid further head injuries”

  • “Use medicine as prescribed” See your doctor if your child still needs pain medicine for a headache longer than 2 weeks after the injury.

If your child’s Symptoms get worse at any time or you notice new symptoms from the list above, or from the first segment, call your doctor or Health Link “811 in Alberta”. You can also call the “Health Link Alberta 24/7 if you have questions about concussion/mild traumatic brain injury or any of the information in this handout.

This information was taken From Alberta Health Services “Concussion (Mild Traumatic Brain Injury) Information slip.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn Standard First Aid + Basic Life Support Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

Online – Blended Standard First Aid Level C CPR & AED

Online – Blended Standard First Aid Level C CPR & AED

We are proud to have the opportunity to offer the new fully accredited “Online Blended First Aid Training / Standard First Aid Level C CPR & AED”. This program is also known as “Blended Learning – Standard First Aid Level C CPR & AED“. Here at Saving Grace we take great pride at keeping up to date on the newest teaching techniques that help save lives and also help save our students time.

The Canadian Red Cross has created this program to help improve the ease of access to students who are short on time, we do understand its difficult for many individuals to take “2 days” away from work.

We recommend that any student seeking an “Online First Aid Course” select a program that is fully Accredited through both your regional governing body for First Aid as well as Occupational Health & Safety. This will allow your certification to remain up to date and provide you with the most recent, and accredited form of First Aid training available.

Online First Aid Training offers a unique advantage by removing a large portion of “theory” from the in class portion and providing it on an “Online First Aid Training Video Class” that you can take part in offered through the Canadian Red Cross Campus. By removing the theory portion of the program from the instructors and placing it on an “Online First Aid Training Video Class” the student can gain the “exact” same information / training and crucial updates to keep your knowledge on track.

This class is broken down into 2 parts that can be completed by attending a 1 day 8 hour skill training / assessment and a 3-4 hour online training seminar through the Online First Aid Training Video Class at the Red Cross E-Learning Campus.

By having all Standard First Aid Level C CPR & AED students trained in the exact same manner and theory, we have seen an amazing improvement in course speed, knowledge and performance as students can work together on the same knowledge base without conflict of information.

Skills Gained in your Online Standard First Aid Level C Course:

  • – What First Aid Is and what we can do to help!
  • – EMS “Emergency Medical Services”
  • – The Role of First Aid attendant
  • – Liability “Laws within your local district”
  • – OHS Act’s and what that means to First Aid Providers
  • – Disease Transmission and Vaccinations
  • – PPE “Personal Protective Equipment” Gloves / Masks
  • – Check Call Care “The 3 Rules of First Aid”
  • – CPR on an ADULT / CHILD / INFANT
  • – AED’s “Automatic External Defibrillators”
  • – 2 Person Rescue “Benefits of Teamwork”
  • – H.A.IN.E.S Recovery Position
  • – Choking Adult / Child / Infant
  • – Med Assist “Should I give medications in First Aid?”
  • – CVD “Cardiovascular Disease /Heart attack & angina
  • – Stroke TIA “Trans ischemic Attack”
  • – Shock
  • – Secondary Survey “What to do while you wait for an ambulance”
  • – Wound Care
  • – Burns Hot vs Cold
  • – Environmental Emergencies “Hypothermia vs Heat Stroke”
  • – Bone Muscle & Joint Injuries
  • – Head / Neck & Spine Injuries
  • – Poisons “Using your Material Safety Data Sheet”
  • – Childhood Illness
  • – Keeping Children Safe
  • – Substance Misuse
  • – Insect Stings or Bites
  • – Animal Bites
  • – Diabetics
  • – Seizures
  • – Asthma
  • – Emergency Child Birth
  • – Miscarriage
  • – First Aid Kits “stocking your own”

To register for your easy access First Aid Course in Edmonton or Online First Aid Course known as “Blended Learning” Standard First Aid Level C CPR & AED feel free to visit our website and register. Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd

Taught Through:

Canadian Red Cross

– Online First Aid Course “Blended Learning”

– Online Standard First Aid Level C CPR & AED

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Online Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

Behavioral & Mental Emergencies

Behavioral & Mental Emergencies

As a First Aid Responded or Family member you may be faced with someone going through a psychological or behavioral crisis. This is a very traumatic event for not only the patient but the rescuer as well. This crisis may be due to a medical condition, mental illness, mind-altering substances, stress, genetic disorders and so many other causes. For this post we will discuss various kinds of behavioral emergencies. “Overdoses, Suicide attempts, violent outbursts, depression, anxiety, inability to cope or understand the actions of others” are all forms of a Behavioral Emergencies. Lets go over what First Aid measures you may be able to implement during this emergency and what care may be required in these situations.

“Never attempt to help a casualty of substance misuse & abuse with your “bare hands”, always ensure your Personal Protection Equipment is on before you help. Avoid secondary exposure as you may suffer adverse effects if you come into contact with the substance”

Myth Bust:

Everyone experiences an emotional crisis at some point in their life, some more severe than others. Perfectly healthy people may have some of the symptoms and signs of mental illness from time to time. Therefore, “you should not assume that you have a mental illness when you behave in certain ways“, for this reason “Please avoid” assumptions about a patient in any given situation. Emotional crisis’s in healthy individuals is normally short lived and can be coped with by following simple steps to overcome the situation that may seem overwhelming. Its “when an individual has repeated instances of the same pattern that leads to repeated emotional crisis situations, there may be a need to consult a medical professional“.

  • The most common misconception about mental illness is that if you are feeling “bad” or “depressed” or “blue” you must be sick!This is simply untrue, there are many perfectly justifiable reasons for feeling depressed, one part of our “Five Coping Stages” is actually “Depression”, – Denial – Anger – Bargaining – Depression – Acceptance are all natural forms of coping with emotional emergencies, each person is unique and will go through these five stages at their own pace and order.

What is a Behavioral or Mental Crisis?

The definition of a behavioral crisis or mental emergency is “any” prolonged or repeated reactions to events that interfere with “Normal Daily Living” or has behavior that is unacceptable to the patient, family, or community. For example, when someone has an interruption of their daily routine, such as washing, dressing, eating, sleeping. Conversely a “Psychiatric Emergency” includes outbursts of rage, disconnection from feelings or reality, feeling numb or anxiety and panicked over small matters that others would see as a daily chore. Behavioral emergencies that recur on a regular basis may be considered a “Mental Health crisis“, consult a medical professional for more details.

Having a Mental Disorder does not make you “Broken”, “Defective”, “Unfit”, “Useless”, “Dangerous” or any less of a person than others around you.” Thoughts or feelings that lead you to believe you are, or if you believe that your “Overwhelmed and unable to cope” with the stresses around you “There is no point“, “ I’m all alone“ or that “nobody would care if I just disappeared” consult a professional. They may be able to help in ways that you have not considered before. Not all emotional emergencies require medications. Medications “Assist” the healing process, if you believe that the medication you are using is not working “Consult your Physician” before you stop taking your medication or adjust your dosage. You may feel good right now, but without the continued assistance of certain medical aids you may find your emotional state revert back to its previously undesirable state.

What to watch for:

People going through a “Behavioral Crisis” or even a “Psychiatric Emergency” may present in many different ways, each person is unique and will experience the emergency differently,:

  • Some may seem distant “in a different world”
  • Disconnected
  • Numb to the world and those around them
  • Depressed with no end in sight
  • Have extreme bouts of sadness with the inability to be consoled
  • Agitated or violent with or without provocation
  • Threaten harm to themselves or others
  • Extreme habit changes to their daily routine, eating, sleeping, hygiene, dressing
  • Altered level of consciousness

How to help with a Behavioral or Mental Crisis:

  1. Check the area, once the area is safe, Check the person and ensure the persons ABC’s are present “Airway / Breathing / Circulation REMEMBERWear gloves if available to avoid bodily fluids or powdered chemical on their clothing / skin.
  2. Call 911 and get an AED if you are alone, you suspect a Head / Neck or Spine injury, there is a motor vehicle collision, the person is allergic or the injured persons life could be at risk. “911 will also try to help with specific questions and techniques that may help you, help the patient in this difficult situation.”
  3. Care for the Behavioral or Mental Crisis by:

Always follow recommendations by your Emergency Response professionals and 911 Dispatch personnel. “Never endanger yourself or the victim, you may “not” need to move or roll the injured person”

If there are other life threatening injuries, treat those first as quickly as possible with as little movement to the injured person.

While you wait for an Ambulance:

a) Be prepared to spend extra time, it may take longer to assess, listen to, and prepare the patient going through the Behavioral or Mental Crisis that they may need further medical help than you can provide.

b) Have a definitive plan of action, “Never” endanger yourself, if the patient looks like they could become agitated or hostile, just stand back, give them space, and have others help you if possible “Never do this alone” if possible. You may find yourself confronted by a hostile individual that may not be able to control their actions, or they may use the time spent alone with you to “alter“ the events that took place when medical professionals arrive. “They may try to blame you, or make you the one experiencing the Behavioral or Mental Crisis” This is a defense mechanism as they do not wish to be judged or harmed.

c) Identify yourself calmly and speak in a low, calm tone. “Avoid shouting, cornering or blame for previous incidence”

d) Be Direct “State your intentions” calmly

e) Stay with them – If you fear that they may hurt themselves, politely stay close to them and let them know that you are going to be there for them should they need you.

f) Encourage purposeful movement, help the patient gather appropriate belongings to take to the hospital.

g) Express interest in their story, If they are comfortable enough to confide in you about the crisis “Just listen” Avoid judgement or offering advice from your own personal opinion “Just listen”.

h) Keep a safe distance “Everyone needs personal space” know the cues, if they pull away, act indifferent, or get agitated with your presence. Keep your distance, you might inadvertently cause more anxiety by being to close.

I) Avoid fighting with them, If you know the patient, respond with understanding to the feelings they are expressing, whether this is anger, fear, or desperation “Just listen”

j) Be honest and reassuring, if they ask whether they should go to the hospital, simply answer “yes”, its better to err on the side of caution and get help rather than let things take a turn for the worse. Your medical professionals will help you with this once they arrive.

k) Do not judge. You may see behavior that you dislike, set those feelings aside, and concentrate on providing emergency care.

Provide continual care and “Never” endanger yourself, some victims of a Behavioral or Mental crisis may also be subjected to a substance misuse & abuse emergency and may become combative and will be unaware of who you are even if they know you well.

While you wait for an Ambulance: “Ask them if they wish to sit or lay in a position of comfort”

RECOVERY Position:

1) Kneel Beside the victim and place the victims furthest arm from you above their head.

2) Place the arm closest to you across the victims chest as a protector arm.

3) The Key is in their Knee, bend the nearest leg up at the knee.

4) Carefully slip your hand under the hollow of the victims neck to support the Head Neck & Spine, at the same time use your forearm by slipping it carefully under the shoulder for leverage.

5) Place your free hand on the Key Knee and gently roll the victim away from you by applying steady pressure against the knee and shoulder at the same time. The victims head should rest on their raised arm.

6) To secure the position pull the key knee further up and bring their protector arm out to use the elbow to stabilize the position.

7) Check the Airway to make sure their still breathing.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

Insect Stings & Bites “How to help”

Insect Stings & Bites

Each region of the world has its own unique form of plants, animals and insects. For this portion lets focus on some basic insects that you can find in many regions of North America. “Remember” insects travel as weather changes in temperature, many new species of insects both toxic or otherwise may be in your region where they previously were not. Its always a good course of action to know what to look for.

Common insects types that may be harmful or fatal:

1) (Spider) Black Widow, Brown Recluse

2) Scorpions

3) Tick’s

4) Bee’s, Wasps, Yellow Jackets, Hornets

5) Caterpillars

What to watch for:

Many toxic species of insect come with a natural warning sign, bright colors, smells, or even posturing can be a significant sign from the insect to “STAY BACK“, its a good idea to keep yourself and your children up to date on local insects in case they do encounter them.

Prevention:

When you are in a wooded, grassy or abandoned area:

  • – Wear a long sleeved shirt and long pants
  • – Tuck your pant legs into your socks or boots and tuck your shirt into your pants. In areas with ticks, use a rubber band or tape the area where your pants meet your socks so that nothing can get underneath.
  • – wear light colored clothing to make it easier to see tiny insects or ticks.
  • – Avoid perfume as it may attract certain insects
  • – stay away from “underbrush” decomposed wood, wood piles or tall grass
  • – Check yourself carefully for insects or ticks after you get inside.
  • – If you have pets that go outdoors, spray them with repellent made for your type of pet. Check them for ticks and insects often because your pet can bring these into your home.
  • – If your allergic keep an “EpiPen” with you while outdoors.

If bitten What to look for:

– Pain, redness, or swelling at the site of the injury

– Insects at the site or nearby

– Intense burning, itching or color change of the skin with a puncture mark.

– The insect is lodged within your tissue “Tick / Leach

– Archery Target or “Bulls-eye” mark on your skin “Tick Bite

– The stinger is lodged within your tissue “Bee’s

– Allergic reaction

How to help with Insect Bites:

1) Check the area, once the area is safe, Check the person and ensure the persons ABC’s are present “Airway / Breathing / CirculationREMEMBERWear gloves if available to avoid bodily fluids or from being bitten.

2) Call 911 and get an AED if you are alone, you suspect a Head / Neck or Spine injury, there is a motor vehicle collision, the person is allergic or the injured persons life could be at risk. “911 will link you to the Animal Control Center if you do not have the number.

3) Care for the Insect Bite by:

Always follow recommendations by your Emergency Response professionals and 911 Dispatch personnel. “Never endanger yourself or the victim, you may “not” need to move or roll the injured person”

– If there are other life threatening injuries, treat those first as quickly as possible with as little movement to the injured person.

a) STINGER EMBEDDED

– Using a hard thin smooth object “Credit Card

– Holding the skin taught scrape towards the stinger using the card “light even pressure” until the stinger comes free.

– Watch for signs of allergic reaction

– Wash with soap and water and seek medical attention if the person feels ill, light headed, or the swelling begins to spread.

b) TICK BITES

– If the tick hasn’t started to dig into the flesh, remove it by brushing it off the skin.

– If the tick has started to dig into the flesh, grasp the head of the tick with tweezers and pull it out gently not to crush the tick.

– If a rash or flu-like symptoms appear within a month after the tick bite, seek medical attention. “Lyme Disease” is a common disease for Tick’s to be infected with.

– Watch for signs of allergic reaction

– Wash with soap and water and seek medical attention if the person feels ill, light headed, or the swelling begins to spread.

c) SPIDER / SCORPION BITES

– If you are bitten, attempt to photograph the spider using your cell phone, or “Don’t endanger yourself” place the specimen in a sealed container. Doctors may need to double check to see if its toxic.

– If the wound begins to burn, raise up and spread there may be a toxic exposure.

RECOVERY Position:

  • 1) Kneel Beside the victim and place the victims furthest arm from you above their head.
  • 2) Place the arm closest to you across the victims chest as a protector arm.
  • 3) The Key is in their Knee, bend the nearest leg up at the knee.
  • 4) Carefully slip your hand under the hollow of the victims neck to support the Head Neck & Spine, at the same time use your forearm by slipping it carefully under the shoulder for leverage.
  • 5) Place your free hand on the Key Knee and gently roll the victim away from you by applying steady pressure against the knee and shoulder at the same time. The victims head should rest on their raised arm.
  • 6) To secure the position pull the key knee further up and bring their protector arm out to use the elbow to stabilize the position.
  • 7) Check the Airway to make sure their still breathing.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn Blended Online First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

Happy Canada Day 2022

HAPPY CANADA DAY!!

5 cool facts about Canada Day!

1) Canada Day is celebrated every 1st July.

2) Canada Day was first celebrated on July 1, 1867.

3) The passing of the Constitution Act, 1867 also occurred on July 4) 1867. It is one of the most important constitutions in Canada.

04In 1982, or more than 100 years later after the holiday’s first celebration, Dominion Day became Canada Day.

5) Patriated by the Canada Act 1982, Dominion Day became Canada Day since the political process changed to full Canadian sovereignty.

#canada

Health Care Provider Level CPR “AKA” Basic Life Support Provider BLS or BCLS

Health Care Provider Level CPR “AKA” Basic Life Support Provider BLS or BCLS

Over the years of helping students get the training they need for the employment they require, we have had countless questions on whether or not someone needs the Health Care Provider level CPR also known as Basic Life Support Provider or the general public version of CPR. We understand the confusion as many societies offer their own version of the HCP Health Care Provider CPR course. The final decision on what course a student needs is what their governing society accepts.

The general public version of CPR-C helps anyone wishing to learn the benefit of life saving skills on all age groups and helps to prepare to help in life threatening emergencies while you wait for Emergency Professionals to arrive.

Some different characteristics of Basic Life Support Provider CPR or Health Care Provider level CPR are the Program is broken down into different sections that show: Compression’s, Breaths, Bag Valve Mask Techniques, teamwork and the difference between Adult, Child and Infant in dealing with Airway obstructions while addressing the Medical Professional’s skills and knowledge.

As a comprehensive Video Based Program that sets the standards on all CPR skills for Health Care Providers. Basic Life Support Provider previously known as BLS for HCP CPR & AED and before that BCLS for HCP’s CPR & AED challenges medical professional students on their knowledge and skills on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation. As of November 2017 new standards and skills have been available for all Health Care Professionals to with the most up to date techniques and training information.

Over the last few years the life saving medication assistance of Naloxone has been added, also known as Narcan (an anti opiate medication used to help those in danger of overdose). The benefit of high quality team work in performing CPR and in the use of AEDs “automatic external defibrillators.” The 2015 version of Basic Life Support Provider focuses on honing the art of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation on all age groups.

In Alberta, Canada the governing body Alberta Health Services along with Covenant Health and Canada Health have set the standard and requested that all Medical Professionals have the Exact Same Training. This means they prefer all students and employees to have the same high quality standard of training and skills to achieve the highest quality of resuscitation during a life threatening event. “If ALL health care Professionals have the exact same training the chance of resuscitation go up

Alberta Health Services, Covenant Health, and Canada Health Recommend, Prefer and Request that all Medical Personnel have their Health Care Provider Level CPR known as Basic Life Support Provider training through the Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation to keep continuity.

Alberta Health Services is setting a standard for all Health Care Professionals, doctors, nurses, paramedics, massage therapists, dentists, pharmacists, nurses aids, nurses attendants, and all personnel working in medical facilities to have Basic Life Support Provider CPR or BLS CPR, previously known as Basic Life Support BLS for Health Care Provider HCP CPR. This will ensure that no matter your job title you have the skills to help during an emergency.

This excellent program is set on a Video Format and takes roughly 4 hours to complete. This new BLS Basic LIfe Support Provider program through The Heart & Stroke Foundation has attempted to set the standard that every school and every student gets the exact same high quality training.

Basic Life Support Provider or BLS previously known as Basic Life Support for Health Care Providers HCP CPR has been shown to provide exactly what Alberta Health Services and many other Health Service Canada centers require and now demand their staff have as training.

With thew new 2020 guidline updates there comes some amazing new information regarding “Team dynamics, Chest Compression Fraction and resuscitation outcomes” Be sure to ask your instructor for information on the changes.

We also have the new “Blended / Online BLS 60 – 90 – 120” options available for those who need to have a more in depth video tutorial. This option can accelerate your “In Class” session but comes with a comprehensive online video session that you will need to complete “prior” to your skill session.

Our Basic Life Support Program is run through our Edmonton Location with many time slots to chose from. As Alberta Health Services also recommends that due to liability, if your BLS CPR or Basic Life Support for Health Care Provider certificate expires you should not be allowed to work until it is reactivated. For this reason Saving Grace Medical has extended our BLS program course dates as of October 1st to “Monday Through Saturday” and even on Sundays upon request for groups. There will be more Basic Life Support Provider CPR/AED Level C courses available for our students.

Getting you the course you need, when you need it! We hope this has helped clear some information on standards set forward by Alberta Health Services.

We look forward to seeing you!

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn Basic Life Support Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

Sudden Medical Emergencies “Part 2 – Diabetes”

Sudden Medical Emergencies “Part 2 – Diabetes”

One of the most common forms of sudden medical emergencies is Diabetes, a diabetic emergency happens when the body cannot control the level of sugar in the blood. The blood sugar level may become too high “Hyperglycemia” or too low “hypoglycemia“. “Literally Diabetes means an imbalance in sugars“, this can alter the victims mental state, breathing rate, might feel or look ill or even appear intoxicated. Once you are able to recognize sings and symptoms the steps to help someone with Diabetes is quite simple.

To help someone who is a Diabetic or a potential Diabetic we should first look at some of the “potential causes“. These causes are a reference to the body’s imbalance between two or more factors.

Causes:

  • – Pregnancy
  • – Lack of Exercise or too much
  • – Imbalanced food intake “High sugar / fat diets
  • – Insulin production “Often organ damage / failure / Malfunction

Signs and Symptoms of Diabetes:

  • – Unusual thirst
  • – Frequent urination
  • – Weight change (gain or loss)
  • – Extreme fatigue or lack of energy
  • – Blurred vision
  • – Frequent or recurring infections
  • – Cuts and bruises that are slow to heal
  • – Tingling or numbness in the hands or feet
  • – Trouble getting or maintaining an erection

Prevention:

  • – Proper Nutrition
  • – Proper exercise
  • – Weight management
  • – Take your medications as prescribed
  • – Check your blood sugar often, especially if you are sick or not following your normal routine.
  • – Keep some quick sugar foods with you at all times.
  • – Lifestyle management

What a Diabetic Emergency looks like:

  • – Changes in the level of consciousness
  • – Changes in behavior, such as confusion or aggression
  • – Rapid Breathing
  • – Cool, sweaty skin
  • – Skin that is paler than normal
  • – Appearance of intoxication
  • – Feeling and looking ill

How to help a Diabetic: High or Low Sugars

1) Check the area, once the area is safe, Check the person and ensure the persons ABC’s are present “Airway / Breathing / CirculationREMEMBERWear gloves if available to avoid bodily fluids.

2) Call 911 and get an AED if you are alone, you suspect a Head / Neck or Spine injury, there is a motor vehicle collision, dangerous environment or the injured persons life could be at risk.

3) Care for the Diabetic casualty by:

Always follow recommendations by your Emergency Response professionals and 911 Dispatch personnel. “Never endanger yourself or the victim, you may “not” need to move or roll the injured person

  • – If there are other life threatening injuries, treat those first as quickly as possible with as little movement to the injured person.

a) If the casualty is conscious and knows its a diabetic emergency“, offer the person a sugary drink such as orange or apple juice. If the person’s condition improves, recommend he or she eat a complete meal to stabilize

b) If the casualty is unconscious” Perform a secondary survey and place the person in the recovery position, continue care until EMS personnel arrive. “Do not stick anything in the casualty’s mouth as they may choke or stop breathing

While you wait for an ambulance:

RECOVERY Position:

  • 1) Kneel Beside the victim and place the victims furthest arm from you above their head.
  • 2) Place the arm closest to you across the victims chest as a protector arm.
  • 3) The Key is in their Knee, bend the nearest leg up at the knee.
  • 4) Carefully slip your hand under the hollow of the victims neck to support the Head Neck & Spine, at the same time use your forearm by slipping it carefully under the shoulder for leverage.
  • 5) Place your free hand on the Key Knee and gently roll the victim away from you by applying steady pressure against the knee and shoulder at the same time. The victims head should rest on their raised arm.
  • 6) To secure the position pull the key knee further up and bring their protector arm out to use the elbow to stabilize the position.
  • 7) Check the Airway to make sure their still breathing.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn Basic Life Support Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.