Basic Life Support Provider CPR&AED “HCP” Heart & Stroke Foundation VS Covid-19

Welcome, we want to help, many students have asked us “Are you training in class? Is your school affected by the restrictions?”, Covid-19 has definitely changed many things in our world. Life as we knew it has literally been turned upside down for so many. Daycares were closed, Schools were closed, all major sporting events were cancelled. This impacted many things including your Pre-Requisite courses for Health Care Professionals, like the Standard First Aid or Basic Life Support Provider CPR class through the Heart & Stroke Foundation.

-GOOD NEWS-

We’re Still Open and Better than ever!

Saving Grace Medical Academy has been a long time supporter of education, to continue our goals of higher education we have moved into the “Fulton Place School” in support of Edmonton Public School Board. What better way to support education and our future than by supporting our very own local Edmonton Public School Board.

New Location

Fulton Place Edmonton Public School

10310 – 56 St NW, Edmonton, Ab, Ca

Classroom #2

Covid-19 had us closed for a few months at a time with each lock down, but it didn’t keep us down. We have new courses to help you get the education you need and certificates when you need them. If you are a #NursingStudent, #MedicalStudent ,#MedicalProfessional or any #HealthCareProfessional that is required to maintain Basic Life Support Provider CPR “BLS”, Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support “ACLS” or even Standard First Aid certificates for the Work Force, we have you covered.

As we continue to support education and our future health care professionals our primary in class training focus has been to provide Standard First Aid + BLS Provider training for the next level of future Nursing Students. This course is required for all students going into EMR, EMT, Nursing, and for practicum training with a current deadline of the end of August for your first semester.

While it may seem that training is scarce for BLS Provider, ACLS Provider, or Red Cross Standard First Aid we have not forgotten about you! Our class sizes are limited to ensure the safety of all in attendance and with this in mind we have the alternative online training methods (BLS Interim, ACLS Interim, and Red Cross Blended – Online Portion): any one of these classes will allow you to work (Occupational Health & Safety Approved) for 90 days as we work to get you in class, while doing our part to slow the spread of Covid-19.

In Class Training is still a GO!

We are now offering in class training for:

Heart & Stroke Foundation

  • Basic Life Support Provider CPR
  • Standard First Aid + Basic Life Support Provider

Canadian Red Cross

  • Standard First Aid CPR-C & AED “Blended 1 Day In Class Course”

Covid-19 Friendly Courses “Online Training”

To keep our students safe and continue to provide them the highest quality of training even during a pandemic, we are continuing to maintain our “Online Training Courses” so that if another lock down were to occur, our students can relax in safety from home and still receive the education they need!

Heart & Stroke Foundation

  • Basic Life Support Provider “Interim Online Class”
  • Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support “Interim Online Course”

Canadian Red Cross

  • Standard First Aid CPR-C & AED “Online”

The Pandemic VS Education

Many schools have been adversely affected by the Covid-19 Pandemic, with new social distancing guidelines, cleaning guidelines, isolation guidelines and lack of supplies to maintain proper sterilization equipment we understood why so many businesses, functions, social gatherings and schools had closed.

We support Edmonton Public Schools

We have new procedures, new courses, a new classroom and all the Covid-19 Pandemic supplies to maintain a cheerful, fun, educational and safe environment for Students of all ages

For more details on the courses we have to help you get back on track, please visit us at

SAVING GRACE MEDICAL ACADEMY

Getting you the courses you need, when you need them!

Deadly Bleeding & How to Stop it

Deadly Bleeding & How to Stop it

Deadly Bleeding or Severe bleeding that ends with large amounts of Blood being lost has the potential to end a victims life very quickly. Either “Internal” or “External” bleeding depending on the volume of Blood being lost can become life threatening and must be controlled as soon as possible. Many of our students have asked great questions including, how much blood can you lose before its too much? How much Blood do we have? Whats the difference between internal and external bleeding? How can I tell if its an Arterial bleed or venous? Are there any tricks I can do to help stop the bleeding? Should I use a tourniquet?

On “average” many people have about 5 to 6 liters of blood within their body, of course size, gender, age and athleticism play factors on this volume as we are all unique. The “average” blood loss that many people can sustain is about 2 cups / 500 ml or 1/2 liter, this volume is much less than many people are aware of and indeed has the potential to become life threatening. So whats the best way to stop the bleeding? As we are not able to do very much for Internal bleeding “Bleeding trapped under the skin” other than seeking medical attention right away, lets focus on external bleeding.

EXTERNAL BLEEDING “Blood is coming out of their body

There are 2 types of external bleeding, Arterial & Venous, the best way to describe them is not to focus on the Blood itself but the volume that is being lost. Arterial bleeds or “From the Artery” will have a “HIGH” volume and may spray, Venous or “From the Vein” will have a “LOW” volume and will steadily bleed out.

The 3 P’s to STOP External Bleeding

1) Pressure… 2) Pressure….. 3) Pressure………

Of course each of these moderate pressures are different and have a different skill that we as rescuers can use to help “Slow the Blood-flow” so that it can stop itself. “Never use a tourniquet” or hard pressure as tourniquet’s STOP blood-flow and any body part deprived of blood & oxygen will eventually die. This can lead to severe complications when the victim arrives at the hospital to receive further medical care. As first response rescuers lets focus on how to “Slow the Blood-flow” so your own body can stop the bleeding itself, this skill will be invaluable for anyone who has external bleeding from either an artery or vein.

The 3 P’s to STOP External Bleeding Stand For

  1. 1) Direct Pressure
  2. 2) Pressure Bandages
  3. 3) Pressure Points

What to Do:

  1. 1) Make sure its safe for you to help the victim before you approach them. If safe to do so check the victim.
  2. 2) If the bleeding looks high in volume or you are not comfortable with care call 911 for further medical aid.
  3. 3) With the wound in view, expose the wound “rinse with cool clean water if needed”
  4. 4) Apply direct pressure with a bandage to the wound “Slow the Blood-Flow” If bleeding persists always add more bandages never take away blood soaked bandages as your wound is beginning to clot.
  5. 5) Apply a Pressure Bandage, to secure a direct pressure bandage use either roller gauze or a triangular bandages to secure your direct pressure bandages in place with a “Moderate pressure” always make sure that circulation is maintained distally or “after the wound”, to do this try pressing on the skin past the wound, if the blood flow is normal the skin will blanch then return to its original color quickly.
  6. 6) For persistent bleeding and Arterial bleeds add the use of pressure points, to do this use an object like a roll of gauze or bandages and place them in the Joint “Arm Pit, Groin, elbow” above the wound then have the victim bend the joint pressing the object in. This will create a pressure on the veins and arteries above to the wound thus slowing the blood flow even more. The addition of Cool packs and elevation may further increase your ability to slow the blood-flow and achiever our goal of having the bleeding stopped.
  7. 7) Combined the 3 Pressures, Direct Pressure, Pressure Bandage & Pressure Points have been shown to greatly increase survival rate of victims experiencing blood loss. Just remember to continue care and seek medical aid for any bleeding that has the potential to be severe.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

Stroke VS TIA “Transient Ischemic Attack”

Stroke VS TIA “Transient Ischemic Attack”

During our instruction of “Cardiovascular Disease” or CVD for short we get many questions on weather or not Stroke’s or TIA’s are closely related to “Heart Attack’s or Angina“. For this reason we normally teach them at the same time to help our new rescuers understand what to look for and how to react during an emergency caused by a Stroke or a TIA “Transient Ischemic Attack“. Some of the more basic questions asked would be: Is a Stroke or TIA life threatening? Can a person suffering a Stroke regain their lost abilities? Is a Stroke or TIA permanent? What are the symptoms of a Stroke or a TIA? What are some of the risk factors that lead to a Stroke or TIA? We will do our best to help you understand the basics and know what to look for.

TIA “Transient Ischemic Attack”

TIA’s have been termed as a “Mini Stroke” with symptoms that mimic that of a full blown Stroke but are short lived and will subside within a few minutes. TIA’s much like Strokes are mainly caused by similar disorders like Cardiovascular Disease CVD, Atherosclerosis or Hereditary defects. The easiest way to explain what TIA’s are is to picture a clear tube in your mind that lets blood flow through it perfectly, now pinch the tube slightly so that the flow of blood is restricted. If this was within your Brain the Brain Tissue that has the restricted flow of blood would starve for Blood & Oxygen causing symptoms that mimic that of a Stroke this is called a “TIA or Transient Ischemic Attack”. Much like a Heart attack is to Angina the similarities are uncanny. Just like Angina the symptoms of a TIA will be short lived and will normally go away once Blood & Oxygen demand has been reduced or assisted with medication

STROKE

A Stroke takes place when the Brain or Specific Brain tissue within the Brain is cut off from Oxygenated Blood. This can lead to the death of the Brain tissue leading to a life threatening emergency known as a Stroke. As previously stated any tissue within the body that has a lack of oxygenated blood will eventually begin to decay and die. Using the same description of a plastic tube with blood flowing through it in your mind, now pinch the tube completely off so that no blood can pass through it, the blockage stops the flow of Oxygen rich blood to the Brain leading to the eventual death of the tissue termed as a “Stroke”.

Much like a Heart attack and Angina the difference between a Stroke or a TIA “Transient Ischemic Attack” isn’t much more than an Artery or blood vessel “tube” being restricted and an Artery or blood vessel “tube” being blocked. For many people a TIA is your “Wake Up Call” as your body is now telling you that there are some risk factors that you need to take care of before the TIA “BECOMES” a Stroke.

Symptoms of a Stroke or TIA:

(4 Suddons)

  1. Sudden Headache “Migraine like symptoms” ,
  2. Sudden Weakness “One side of the body more than the other” ,
  3. Sudden Speech Problems “Aphasia” ,
  4. Sudden Anxiety – Slurred or hard to understand speech – Facial Droop “One Side” – Loss of motor skills “One Side“.

Risk Factors:

-Smoking -High Blood Pressure -Poor Diet “Processed Foods” -High Cholesterol -Obesity -Lack of regular Exercise -High Stress -Gender -Heredity -Age.

How to Help:

  1. 1) Have the Person rest in a comfortable position and try not to move as much as possible.
  2. 2) Call 911 “You can not tell the difference between a Stroke or a TIA” the TIA will be short lived about 15 minutes, a Stroke will not as brain damage is taking place and can be permanent or even Fatal. Don’t Waste time trying to figure it out “better safe than sorry”.
  3. 3) Keep the person calm, assist with any medications if they have them and wait for an ambulance or the symptoms to subside.

Weather your daily life or habits fall under some of the risk factors or all of them you should notice that many of these are easily fixed with some changes in personal outlook and removing of bad habits. Everyone want’s to live a long and healthy life, once you know the risks you can take charge of your own life and do what you can to avoid your body failing on you.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

Angina VS Heart Attack:

Angina VS Heart Attack:

When we teach about “Cardiovascular Disease” or CVD for short we notice that many people are a little unclear as to the difference between a Heart Attack or Angina. Can a Heart attack kill you? Can Angina be life threatening? Can Angina become a heart attack? What are the symptoms for Angina or a Heart Attack? We will do our best to explain the differences and what to look for to help you understand the potential deadly emergency when dealing with Angina & Heart Attack scenarios.

ANGINA

Angina has been termed as “chest pain or pressure that comes and goes” however it can be much more than that. Also the signs and symptoms of Angina mimic the signs and symptoms of a Heart Attack almost perfectly with only a few subtle differences. The main causes of Angina are also similar to that of a Heart Attack stemming from problems like Cardiovascular Disease, heart disorders or Anemia. The easiest way to explain what Angina is is to picture a clear tube in your mind that lets blood flow through it perfectly, now pinch the tube slightly so that the flow of blood is restricted. If this was within your heart the muscle that has the restricted flow of blood would starve for Blood & Oxygen causing symptoms that mimic that of a heart attack “Angina“. The symptoms however would go away once the demand for Blood & Oxygen has been reduced or assisted with medications. Often Angina will go away with rest in about 10 minutes and or medication assistance

HEART ATTACK

Heart Attacks happen when the heart or specific muscle tissue within the heart can’t get enough Oxygenated Blood. This can lead to the death of the heart muscle and tissue leading to a life threatening emergency, as we all know any body part that can not get enough Blood & Oxygen will eventually die. Using the same description of a plastic tube with blood flowing through it in your mind, now pinch the tube completely off so that no blood can pass through it, the blockage stops the flow of Oxygen rich blood to the heart leading to the eventual death of the tissue termed as a “Heart Attack

As you can see the difference between Angina and a Heart Attack isn’t much more than an Artery “tube” being restricted and an Artery “tube” being blocked. Angina for many people is your “Wake Up Call” as your body is now telling you that there are some risk factors that you need to take care of before Angina “BECOMES” a Heart Attack.

Symptoms of a Heart Attack & Angina:

-Squeezing Chest Pain -Problems Breathing -Abdominal or lower back pain “More common in women” – Cold sweaty skin -Bluish or paler than normal skin tone -Nausea & Vomiting -“Denial” -Jaw Pain -Left Arm / Shoulder Pain -Feeling of Heart Burn.

Risk Factors:

-Smoking -High Blood Pressure -Poor Diet “Processed Foods” -High Cholesterol -Obesity -Lack of regular Exercise -High Stress -Gender -Heredity -Age.

How to Help:

  1. 1) Have the Person rest in a comfortable position and try not to move as much as possible.
  2. 2) Call 911You can not tell the difference between a heart attack or angina” angina will be short lived about 10 minutes, a heart attack will not. Don’t Waste time trying to figure it out “better safe than sorry“.
  3. 3) Keep the person calm, assist with any medications if they have them and wait for an ambulance or the symptoms to subside.

Weather your daily life or habits fall under some of the risk factors or all of them you should notice that many of these are easily fixed with some changes in personal outlook and removing of bad habits. Everyone want’s to live a long and healthy life, once you know the risks you can take charge of your own life and do what you can to avoid your body failing on you.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.