Choking, How to help and what to look for.

Choking, How to help and what to look for.

Choking can happen to anyone of any age, and is one of the worst fears for many new parents as it happens fast causing serious problems including death. In most cases where the victim can still cough the object will come free on its own. However once the victim is unable to cough anymore the airway is potentially blocked and the victims life is now in jeopardy.

The most common causes of chocking include trying to swallow large pieces of food, eating while talking, walking or playing, being under the influence of an intoxicant or elicit substance while eating.

What to look for:

-Inability to speak, cough or breath

-Change in face color like bluish, red, or paler than normal

-Look of panic with wide eyes “Fear”

-One or both hands clutching the throat or flailing

-High pitch whistle or noise when they attempt to breath or cough

In the Adult or Child once you have identified yourself and that you are going to attempt to help them:

1) Encourage the Victim to continue to cough the object free

2) If the victim can no longer cough, speak or breathe

-Stand or kneel beside the victim and wrap one arm diagonally across the victims chest

-Bend the victim forward at the waist at a 90 degree angle

-With the palm of your hand deliver 5 FIRM BACK BLOWS between the shoulder blades to encourage them to cough.

3) If the object has NOT come free in the first 5 Back Blows

-Quickly stand the victim up strait and place one hand in a first just above the belly button thumb side in.

-Place your other hand over your fist hand and pull sharply in and up in a ” J ” like Motion 5 Times

4) Repeat the 5 FIRM BACK BLOWS & the 5 ABDOMINAL J THRUSTS until they POP or DROP.

5) If the Victim becomes unconscious and is not breathing Call for help 911 and begin CPR 30 Compression, 2 Breaths, Repeat 5 Times in a row. After your 5th cycle of 30/2 if the victim is not breathing repeat until help arrives.

To prevent yourself or others from chocking just remind them to chew food well before swallowing, eat slowly and calmly, try not to talk, laugh or do physical activities while chewing and avoid mixing meals with other substances which could alter your personality.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

What to do while you wait for an Ambulance

What to do while you wait for an Ambulance

After rescuing a victim there are many things that can be flowing through your mind. Did I do this right? Was my First Aid technique proper? Is there anything else I can do to help the victim? These questions are normal and there are even more that will pop in during an emergency.

Normally an Ambulance within an Urban setting can take anywhere from 5 too 25 minutes to respond, in Rural area’s response time can vary from 15 to 40 minutes an in most cases where distance is past 30 to 45 minutes a helicopter service may be deployed to meet you somewhere. In essence this means after you’ve rescued the victim you may have a little time to make sure that your First Aid techniques have helped.

We call this skill while your waiting a “Secondary Survey”, its your second chance to find something you might have missed during your primary survey. The Secondary Survey can be performed quite easily in two simple fashions, Hands On or Hands Off. What we mean by this is you can pat the person down from head to toe looking for injuries you might have missed “Hands On”, or “Hands Off” and ask the victim to tell you what’s going on.

Both techniques are easily performed but have their uses, the Hands on Check is normally performed for victims rendered unconscious due to the emergency they experienced, and the Hands Off check likewise is performed for victims still conscious enough to walk you through the emergency by asking them the SAMPLE history questions.

What to Do while waiting for an emergency?

1) Care for the cause of the Emergency

2) Have the victim rest in a position of comfort or the Recovery Position

3) Keep the victim warm

4) Ensure the victim is breathing and has an open airway

5) Offer comfort, warmth and reassurance

6) Double check “Hands on / Hands Off” SAMPLE Questions

-S – Signs & Symptoms -Whats wrong?

-A – Allergies – Do you have any?

-M – Medications – Are you on any?

-P – Past Medical History – Has this happened before?

-L -Last Meal – When / What did you eat?

-E – Event – Do you remember everything?

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

SHOCK – What to look for & How to Help

SHOCK – What to look for & How to Help

Shock is one of those things that all of us will experience sometime in our life and yet many of us have forgotten that it also can be a deadly scenario. “Shock Always Has A Cause” and that’s one thing that we can use to help us treat it, once you figure out what has caused it “Fix it” and shock will begin to lessen.

Shock happens when your body goes through a sudden internal or external event causing the body to demand more oxygen rich blood. In doing so the body will focus the remaining oxygen rich blood it has into key body parts to sustain your life and yet leave others unattended. Any vital organ which does not have enough blood or oxygen will eventually begin to fail. This is why “Shock Can Be Deadly”.

“Anyone can go into Shock, even those rescuing the casualties”

To make it easy just remember that it “Doesn’t Matter what caused the Casualty to go into shock” once you figure out what caused it “Fix it”.

Shock can often be caused by:

-Excessive Blood Loss – A Weak Heart – Extensive Burns – Infection – Excessive Fluid Loss – Fear or Anxiety – and many more

What to look for:

Altered Personality – Extreme Anxiety – Cool / Clammy Skin – Pale Skin tone – Confusion – Excessive thirst – Rapid Breathing – Nausea / Vomiting / weakness – Drowsiness.

How to help:

-Move or Remove the casualty “If possible” from the area that may be causing the shock.

-Assess the victim and find the root of the cause “Shock Always Has A Cause”

-Offer comfort / warmth and reassurance

-Treat the cause of the shock and follow your local emergency response techniques.

Shock Treatments:

– Altered Personality / Consciousness – Offer Comfort, warmth and reassurance while guiding the casualty away from danger or harm. Never restrain a casualty as they may lash out, find a position of comfort and wait for medical help to arrive or transport the patient using 911 recommendations to your local medical facility.

– Extreme Anxiety – Offer Comfort, warmth and reassurance, respect the casualties personal comfort level’s and boundaries and assist the casualty in breathing exercises to help reduce anxiety. Be patient and monitor the casualties breathing, if their breathing becomes altered or they are uncontrollable contact 911 for help, “211” in Alberta is also another hot key number to use if you need to talk to a qualified mental health professional.

– Blood Loss – Immediately Apply Direct Pressure to the wound with a clean non stick dressing, if bleeding persists and a pressure bandage around the dressing to secure a “Even” Pressure “Not tight” You do not want to “stop blood flow”, If bleeding persists add pressure points “The Pressure Points are in your Joints!” Place a rolled up piece of dressing or an object large enough to fit into the joint above the wound and have the casualty press the joint inward against the artery’s “This will help slow the blood flow”. “Only” Apply a Tourniquet under the advisement of a 911 dispatcher.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.