“Standard First Aid Level C CPR & AED” and Online First Aid Training at your fingertips.

“Standard First Aid Level C CPR & AED” and Online First Aid Training at your fingertips.

We are proud to have the opportunity to offer the new fully accredited “Online First Aid Training / Standard First Aid Level C CPR & AED”. This program is also known as “Blended Learning Standard First Aid Level C CPR & AED“. Here at Saving Grace we take great pride at keeping up to date on the newest teaching techniques that help save lives and also help save our students time.

The Canadian Red Cross has created this program to help improve the ease of access to students who are short on time, we do understand its difficult for many individuals to take “2 days” away from work.

We recommend that any student seeking an “Online First Aid Course” select a program that is fully Accredited through both your regional governing body for First Aid as well as Occupational Health & Safety. This will allow your certification to remain up to date and provide you with the most recent, and accredited form of First Aid training available.

Online First Aid Training offers a unique advantage by removing a large portion of “theory” from the in class portion and providing it on an “Online First Aid Training Video Class” that you can take part in offered through the Canadian Red Cross Campus. By removing the theory portion of the program from the instructors and placing it on an “Online First Aid Training Video Class” the student can gain the “exact” same information / training and crucial updates to keep your knowledge on track.

This class is broken down into 2 parts that can be completed by attending a 1 day 8 hour skill training / assessment and a 3-4 hour online training seminar through the Online First Aid Training Video Class at the Red Cross E-Learning Campus.

By having all Standard First Aid Level C CPR & AED students trained in the exact same manner and theory, we have seen an amazing improvement in course speed, knowledge and performance as students can work together on the same knowledge base without conflict of information.

Skills Gained in your Online Standard First Aid Level C Course:

  • – What First Aid Is and what we can do to help!
  • – EMS “Emergency Medical Services”
  • – The Role of First Aid attendant
  • – Liability “Laws within your local district”
  • – OHS Act’s and what that means to First Aid Providers
  • – Disease Transmission and Vaccinations
  • – PPE “Personal Protective Equipment” Gloves / Masks
  • – Check Call Care “The 3 Rules of First Aid”
  • – CPR on an ADULT / CHILD / INFANT
  • – AED’s “Automatic External Defibrillators”
  • – 2 Person Rescue “Benefits of Teamwork”
  • – H.A.IN.E.S Recovery Position
  • – Choking Adult / Child / Infant
  • – Med Assist “Should I give medications in First Aid?”
  • – CVD “Cardiovascular Disease /Heart attack & angina
  • – Stroke TIA “Trans ischemic Attack”
  • – Shock
  • – Secondary Survey “What to do while you wait for an ambulance”
  • – Wound Care
  • – Burns Hot vs Cold
  • – Environmental Emergencies “Hypothermia vs Heat Stroke”
  • – Bone Muscle & Joint Injuries
  • – Head / Neck & Spine Injuries
  • – Poisons “Using your Material Safety Data Sheet”
  • – Childhood Illness
  • – Keeping Children Safe
  • – Substance Misuse
  • – Insect Stings or Bites
  • – Animal Bites
  • – Diabetics
  • – Seizures
  • – Asthma
  • – Emergency Child Birth
  • – Miscarriage
  • – First Aid Kits “stocking your own”

To register for your easy access First Aid Course in Edmonton or Online First Aid Course known as “Blended Learning” Standard First Aid Level C CPR & AED feel free to visit our website and register. Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd

Taught Through:

Canadian Red Cross

– Online First Aid Course “Blended Learning”

– Online Standard First Aid Level C CPR & AED

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

Croup

Croup

Croup is a very common illness that affects children and has the potential to be mild in symptoms or even dangerous to life threatening if it goes untreated. Children from the ages of 6 months to 3 years have a chance of contracting “Croup” on average once or twice and can be linked to other “respiratory illness“. It is always a good measure for Parents and Guardians to take “all” respiratory illness” as serious and seek further medical advice, “We need to breath to live

Croup is an infection that causes swelling of the voice box “larynx” and windpipe “trachea“, making the airway just below the vocal cords inflamed, swollen and narrow. This makes breathing both noisy and difficult. There are two main types of Croup and as such must be seen as “Infectious

Different Types of Croup

 Viral Croup – This is the most common type of Croup and is the result of viral infection in the voice box or airway, Temperatures range from low fever to 39C/104F. Often Viral Croup will start with a cold that slowly turns into a “Barking Cough“. The child’s voice will become hoarse with noisy breathing “Stridor“.

“Stridor” is the coarse musical sound that comes with breathing through an inflamed-swollen airway. The danger of “Croup with Stridor sounds” is that the airway is continuing to swell. If this happens it may reach a point when your child cannot breath at all. “Stridor” should always be assessed by a physician to prevent the danger of a closed airway. Stridor is common with mild Croup and increases with activity or crying, however if Stridor persists while the child is resting, it can be a sign of severe Croup and you must seek medical aid. Stridor may also be a sign of a serous breathing problem such as Epiglottitis.

– Spasmodic Croup – This form of Croup is caused by a mild upper respiratory infection or even an “Allergy” normally no fever is present. This is the scariest form of Croup as it has a “sudden” onset and often presents in the middle of the night. The child will go to bed with mild “Cold” like symptoms then wake up gasping for breath with hoarse beathing, a barking cough and “stridor”. As the child’s effort to breath increases their energy levels will decrease, they may even stop eating or drinking and eventually become “too tired to cough”, if this is the case “seek medical attention immediately”

Treatments

“Always consult a medical professional before treating illness on your own, home made remedies may not have the desired effect and may make the illness-symptoms worse”

  • -If your child wakes up in the middle of the night with Croup, take them into the bathroom, close the door, then turn on the shower on the hottest setting “Do not put them in the shower“. The “Steam” from the shower over 15-20 minutes will help ease the symptoms as you sit in the bathroom with the child. “The child will still have the barking cough though“,
  • -For the rest of the night “and 2 to 3 nights after“, try to a “cold” water vaporizer or humidifier in your child’s room. Your child may have another attack of Croup even within the same night, if they do repeat the shower steam treatment. Steam almost always works, if it does not, try fresh night air and open up the window of their room “wide”. If the child still persists with coarse hoarse breaths and Strider contact your local Medical Professional.

“In Alberta Canada you can contact “811” to contact the Alberta Health Link, a Registered Nurse or Paramedic will help you with treatments and options, they may also refer to you to bring the child into a Hospital for treatment.”

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

Behavioral & Mental Emergencies

Behavioral & Mental Emergencies

As a First Aid Responded or Family member you may be faced with someone going through a psychological or behavioral crisis. This is a very traumatic event for not only the patient but the rescuer as well. This crisis may be due to a medical condition, mental illness, mind-altering substances, stress, genetic disorders and so many other causes. For this post we will discuss various kinds of behavioral emergencies. “Overdoses, Suicide attempts, violent outbursts, depression, anxiety, inability to cope or understand the actions of others” are all forms of a Behavioral Emergencies. Lets go over what First Aid measures you may be able to implement during this emergency and what care may be required in these situations.

“Never attempt to help a casualty of substance misuse & abuse with your “bare hands”, always ensure your Personal Protection Equipment is on before you help. Avoid secondary exposure as you may suffer adverse effects if you come into contact with the substance”

Myth Bust:

Everyone experiences an emotional crisis at some point in their life, some more severe than others. Perfectly healthy people may have some of the symptoms and signs of mental illness from time to time. Therefore, “you should not assume that you have a mental illness when you behave in certain ways“, for this reason “Please avoid” assumptions about a patient in any given situation. Emotional crisis’s in healthy individuals is normally short lived and can be coped with by following simple steps to overcome the situation that may seem overwhelming. Its “when an individual has repeated instances of the same pattern that leads to repeated emotional crisis situations, there may be a need to consult a medical professional“.

  • The most common misconception about mental illness is that if you are feeling “bad” or “depressed” or “blue” you must be sick!” This is simply untrue, there are many perfectly justifiable reasons for feeling depressed, one part of our “Five Coping Stages” is actually “Depression”, – Denial – Anger – Bargaining – Depression – Acceptance are all natural forms of coping with emotional emergencies, each person is unique and will go through these five stages at their own pace and order.

What is a Behavioral or Mental Crisis?

The definition of a behavioral crisis or mental emergency is “any” prolonged or repeated reactions to events that interfere with “Normal Daily Living” or has behavior that is unacceptable to the patient, family, or community. For example, when someone has an interruption of their daily routine, such as washing, dressing, eating, sleeping. Conversely a “Psychiatric Emergency” includes outbursts of rage, disconnection from feelings or reality, feeling numb or anxiety and panicked over small matters that others would see as a daily chore. Behavioral emergencies that recur on a regular basis may be considered a “Mental Health crisis“, consult a medical professional for more details.

Having a Mental Disorder does not make you “Broken”, “Defective”, “Unfit”, “Useless”, “Dangerous” or any less of a person than others around you.” Thoughts or feelings that lead you to believe you are, or if you believe that your “Overwhelmed and unable to cope” with the stresses around you “There is no point“, “ I’m all alone“ or that “nobody would care if I just disappeared” consult a professional. They may be able to help in ways that you have not considered before. Not all emotional emergencies require medications. Medications “Assist” the healing process, if you believe that the medication you are using is not working “Consult your Physician” before you stop taking your medication or adjust your dosage. You may feel good right now, but without the continued assistance of certain medical aids you may find your emotional state revert back to its previously undesirable state.

What to watch for:

People going through a “Behavioral Crisis” or even a “Psychiatric Emergency” may present in many different ways, each person is unique and will experience the emergency differently,:

  • Some may seem distant “in a different world”
  • Disconnected
  • Numb to the world and those around them
  • Depressed with no end in sight
  • Have extreme bouts of sadness with the inability to be consoled
  • Agitated or violent with or without provocation
  • Threaten harm to themselves or others
  • Extreme habit changes to their daily routine, eating, sleeping, hygiene, dressing
  • Altered level of consciousness

How to help with a Behavioral or Mental Crisis:

  1. Check the area, once the area is safe, Check the person and ensure the persons ABC’s are present “Airway / Breathing / Circulation REMEMBER – Wear gloves if available to avoid bodily fluids or powdered chemical on their clothing / skin.
  2. Call 911 and get an AED if you are alone, you suspect a Head / Neck or Spine injury, there is a motor vehicle collision, the person is allergic or the injured persons life could be at risk. “911 will also try to help with specific questions and techniques that may help you, help the patient in this difficult situation.”
  3. Care for the Behavioral or Mental Crisis by:

Always follow recommendations by your Emergency Response professionals and 911 Dispatch personnel. “Never endanger yourself or the victim, you may “not” need to move or roll the injured person”

If there are other life threatening injuries, treat those first as quickly as possible with as little movement to the injured person.

While you wait for an Ambulance:

a) Be prepared to spend extra time, it may take longer to assess, listen to, and prepare the patient going through the Behavioral or Mental Crisis that they may need further medical help than you can provide.

b) Have a definitive plan of action, “Never” endanger yourself, if the patient looks like they could become agitated or hostile, just stand back, give them space, and have others help you if possible “Never do this alone” if possible. You may find yourself confronted by a hostile individual that may not be able to control their actions, or they may use the time spent alone with you to “alter“ the events that took place when medical professionals arrive. “They may try to blame you, or make you the one experiencing the Behavioral or Mental Crisis” This is a defense mechanism as they do not wish to be judged or harmed.

c) Identify yourself calmly and speak in a low, calm tone. “Avoid shouting, cornering or blame for previous incidence”

d) Be Direct “State your intentions” calmly

e) Stay with them – If you fear that they may hurt themselves, politely stay close to them and let them know that you are going to be there for them should they need you.

f) Encourage purposeful movement, help the patient gather appropriate belongings to take to the hospital.

g) Express interest in their story, If they are comfortable enough to confide in you about the crisis “Just listen” Avoid judgement or offering advice from your own personal opinion “Just listen”.

h) Keep a safe distance “Everyone needs personal space” know the cues, if they pull away, act indifferent, or get agitated with your presence. Keep your distance, you might inadvertently cause more anxiety by being to close.

I) Avoid fighting with them, If you know the patient, respond with understanding to the feelings they are expressing, whether this is anger, fear, or desperation “Just listen”

j) Be honest and reassuring, if they ask whether they should go to the hospital, simply answer “yes”, its better to err on the side of caution and get help rather than let things take a turn for the worse. Your medical professionals will help you with this once they arrive.

k) Do not judge. You may see behavior that you dislike, set those feelings aside, and concentrate on providing emergency care.

Provide continual care and “Never” endanger yourself, some victims of a Behavioral or Mental crisis may also be subjected to a substance misuse & abuse emergency and may become combative and will be unaware of who you are even if they know you well.

While you wait for an Ambulance: “Ask them if they wish to sit or lay in a position of comfort”

RECOVERY Position:

1) Kneel Beside the victim and place the victims furthest arm from you above their head.

2) Place the arm closest to you across the victims chest as a protector arm.

3) The Key is in their Knee, bend the nearest leg up at the knee.

4) Carefully slip your hand under the hollow of the victims neck to support the Head Neck & Spine, at the same time use your forearm by slipping it carefully under the shoulder for leverage.

5) Place your free hand on the Key Knee and gently roll the victim away from you by applying steady pressure against the knee and shoulder at the same time. The victims head should rest on their raised arm.

6) To secure the position pull the key knee further up and bring their protector arm out to use the elbow to stabilize the position.

7) Check the Airway to make sure their still breathing.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

Basic Life Support Provider CPR “In Class Training”

Welcome, we want to help, many students have asked us “Are you training in class yet?”, Covid-19 has definitely changed many things in our world. Life as we knew it has literally been turned upside down for so many. Daycares were closed, Schools were closed, all major sporting events were cancelled. This impacted many things including your Pre-Requisite courses for Health Care Professionals, like the Basic Life Support Provider CPR class through the Heart & Stroke Foundation.

-GOOD NEWS-

We’re BACK and Better than ever!

Saving Grace Medical Academy has been a long time supporter of education, to continue our goals of higher education we have moved into the “Fulton Place School” in support of Edmonton Public School Board. What better way to support education and our future than by supporting our very own local Edmonton Public School Board.

New Location

Fulton Place Edmonton Public School

10310 – 56 St NW, Edmonton, Ab, Ca

Classroom #2

Covid-19 had us closed for a few months, but it didn’t keep us down. We have new courses to help you get the education you need and certificates when you need them. If you are a #NursingStudent, #MedicalStudent ,#MedicalProfessional or any #HealthCareProfessional that is required to maintain Basic Life Support Provider CPR “BLS”, Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support “ACLS” or even Standard First Aid certificates for the Work Force, we have you covered.

As we continue to support education and our future health care professionals our primary in class training focus for July has been to provide Standard First Aid + BLS Provider training. This course is required for all students going into EMR, EMT, Nursing, and for practicum training with a current deadline of the beginning of August. While it may seem that training is scarce for BLS Provider, ACLS Provider, or Red Cross Standard First Aid we have not forgotten about you! Our class sizes are limited during Phase 2 and with this in mind we have the alternative online training methods (BLS Interim, ACLS Interim, and Red Cross Blended – Online Portion): any one of these classes will allow you to work (Occupational Health & Safety Approved) for 90 days as we work to get you in class.

In Class Training has Resumed!

We are now offering in class training for:

Heart & Stroke Foundation

  • Basic Life Support Provider CPR
  • Standard First Aid + Basic Life Support Provider

Canadian Red Cross

  • Standard First Aid CPR-C & AED “Blended 1 Day In Class Course”

Covid-19 Friendly Courses “Online Training”

To keep our students safe and continue to provide them the highest quality of training even during a pandemic, we are continuing to maintain our “Online Training Courses” so that if another lock down were to occur, our students can relax in safety from home and still receive the education they need!

Heart & Stroke Foundation

  • Basic Life Support Provider “Interim Online Class”
  • Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support “Interim Online Course”

Canadian Red Cross

  • Standard First Aid CPR-C & AED “Online”

The Pandemic VS Education

Many schools have been adversely affected by the Covid-19 Pandemic, with new social distancing guidelines, cleaning guidelines, isolation guidelines and lack of supplies to maintain proper sterilization equipment we understood why so many businesses, functions, social gatherings and schools had closed.

We support Edmonton Public Schools

We have new procedures, new courses, a new classroom and all the Covid-19 Pandemic supplies to maintain a cheerful, fun, educational and safe environment for Students of all ages

For more details on the courses we have to help you get back on track, please visit us at

SAVING GRACE MEDICAL ACADEMY

Getting you the courses you need, when you need them!

Animal Bites

Animal Bites

Each region of the world has its own unique form of predator and prey animals. For this portion lets focus on some basic animal types that you can find in many regions of the world. “Remember” never assume an animal you randomly encounter is tame, animals within parks are wild and should be treated as such. Your personal safety and safety of others around you is the most important thing when dealing with wild animals or animals that attack humans. Be safe, be aware, be loud, many animal attacks in the wild occur due to a startled animal that is unaware of your presence.

Common Predatory animal types that you may encounter:

1) K9, Dog, Wolf, Fox, Coyote

2) Feline, Cat, Puma, Linx, Bob-Cat, Cougar

3) Bear, Brown, Black, Kodiak, Grizzly

4) Snake

5) Marine Life

What to watch for:

  • Predator Type “Land” :Normally Carnivores / Omnivores – Posturing, growing, swiping at the ground, hissing or following you just out of sight or within a wooded area, these universal signs are of a predatory animal that is either intimidated by your presence, or is stalking you to determine if you are food.
  • Prey Type “Land“: Normally Herbivores – Hoof stamping, posturing, raised back with hissing, snorting, spitting or loud calls, may charge with head down. These universal signs are of a prey animal that is attempting to defend itself or its young.

Prevention:

When you are in a wooded, grassy or abandoned area:

  • – Be loud, clapping of hands, talking loudly will help other animals know you are in the vicinity.
  • – Be seen, wear brightly colored clothing that is easy to spot.
  • – Be aware, consult your local fish and wildlife association before going into an unfamiliar wooded area, knowing the dangers can help you avoid them.
  • – Don’t keep food on you while in wooded areas or camping, keep all food stores in a locked box away from your camp site in case predators are attracted.
  • – If you have pets that go outdoors, be aware that smaller pets can be seen as food for larger predatory animals and may be taken. Keep an eye on your pets and be aware of the local Predators within your region
  • – Never approach an unfamiliar animal
  • – Animals in parks are not tame
  • – Animals with collars are “Tagged” for research purposes and should be avoided as they me be a nuisance animal that has been tagged so that they may be removed from populated area’s.
  • – The animal may seem calm, but keep your distance, getting to close may make the animal react to defend itself.

Stings from Marine Life:

“Know the water you are swimming in and stay away from stinging marine life”

Watch for – Pain, Rash, Redness, Swelling

How to help: While wearing gloves, remove any tentacles or pieces of the animal. Wash the area with vinegar for at least 30 seconds, if vinegar isn’t available use a mixture of baking soda and water “Make the consistency like toothpaste” and leave it on the area for 20 minutes. Then immerse the affected are in “hot” water “as hot as patient can tolerate” for 20 minutes or as long as the pain persists. ‘Do not Rub the area“. Scrape or shave the are with a razor or the edge of a knife, put a cold pack on the area for the first hour to reduce the pain “Seek Medical Attention” to verify that the bite / sting was non toxic.

Snakebites:

“Do not aggravate a snake, if out hiking watch where you are stepping, wear proper footwear when hiking”

  • Watch for – Intense Pain, Burning, red raised tender skin that blanches at the puncture site, liquid seeping from the wound.

How to help: Keep the injured site still and lower than the heart if possible. “Seek Medical Attention Immediately” by calling 911, if you have a physical description of the snake, report it to EMS personnel because it may help them provide the best treatment. Check the temperature and color of the limb beyond the site of the bite and note if it is abnormally cold or warm compared to the other limb. Report this to EMS personnel.

MYTH BUST:

  • NEVER – Apply ice, cut the wound “blood letting”, apply suction “Sucking it out”, apply a tourniquet to a snake bite. These myths will make the injury worse and can cause serious harm.
  • NEVER – Urinate on a wound, this may cause more pain and lead to further infection with psychological trauma.

How to help with animal Bites:

1) Check the area, once the area is safe, Check the person and ensure the persons ABC’s are present “Airway / Breathing / Circulation REMEMBER – Wear gloves if available to avoid bodily fluids or venom.

2) Call 911 and get an AED if you are alone, you suspect a Head / Neck or Spine injury, there is a motor vehicle collision, the person is allergic or the injured persons life could be at risk. “911 will link you to the Animal Control Center if you do not have the number.”

3) Care for the animal Bite by:

Always follow recommendations by your Emergency Response professionals and 911 Dispatch personnel. “Never endanger yourself or the victim, you may “not” need to move or roll the injured person”

  • – If there are other life threatening injuries, treat those first as quickly as possible with as little movement to the injured person.

a) Try to get the person safely away from the animal without injuring yourself. Make loud noises and get other people to help if available “Strength in numbers”

b) Never try to “Capture the animal” this may endanger yourself

c) If the wound is minor, wash it with soap and water, control any bleeding and put a dressing on the wound. Watch for signs of infection.

d) Seek medical aid, all animal bites and stings should be checked by a physician to ensure no infection is present and that the patients psychological well being is maintained. Being attacked by a wild animal can be traumatic.

While you wait for an Ambulance:

RECOVERY Position:

1) Kneel Beside the victim and place the victims furthest arm from you above their head.

2) Place the arm closest to you across the victims chest as a protector arm.

3) The Key is in their Knee, bend the nearest leg up at the knee.

4) Carefully slip your hand under the hollow of the victims neck to support the Head Neck & Spine, at the same time use your forearm by slipping it carefully under the shoulder for leverage.

5) Place your free hand on the Key Knee and gently roll the victim away from you by applying steady pressure against the knee and shoulder at the same time. The victims head should rest on their raised arm.

6) To secure the position pull the key knee further up and bring their protector arm out to use the elbow to stabilize the position.

7) Check the Airway to make sure their still breathing.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

Insect Stings & Bites

Insect Stings & Bites

Each region of the world has its own unique form of plants, animals and insects. For this portion lets focus on some basic insects that you can find in many regions of North America. “Remember” insects travel as weather changes in temperature, many new species of insects both toxic or otherwise may be in your region where they previously were not. Its always a good course of action to know what to look for.

Common insects types that may be harmful or fatal:

1) (Spider) Black Widow, Brown Recluse

2) Scorpions

3) Tick’s

4) Bee’s, Wasps, Yellow Jackets, Hornets

5) Caterpillars

What to watch for:

Many toxic species of insect come with a natural warning sign, bright colors, smells, or even posturing can be a significant sign from the insect to “STAY BACK“, its a good idea to keep yourself and your children up to date on local insects in case they do encounter them.

Prevention:

When you are in a wooded, grassy or abandoned area:

  • – Wear a long sleeved shirt and long pants
  • – Tuck your pant legs into your socks or boots and tuck your shirt into your pants. In areas with ticks, use a rubber band or tape the area where your pants meet your socks so that nothing can get underneath.
  • – wear light colored clothing to make it easier to see tiny insects or ticks.
  • – Avoid perfume as it may attract certain insects
  • – stay away from “underbrush” decomposed wood, wood piles or tall grass
  • – Check yourself carefully for insects or ticks after you get inside.
  • – If you have pets that go outdoors, spray them with repellent made for your type of pet. Check them for ticks and insects often because your pet can bring these into your home.
  • – If your allergic keep an “EpiPen” with you while outdoors.

If bitten What to look for:

– Pain, redness, or swelling at the site of the injury

– Insects at the site or nearby

– Intense burning, itching or color change of the skin with a puncture mark.

– The insect is lodged within your tissue “Tick / Leach

– Archery Target or “Bulls-eye” mark on your skin “Tick Bite

– The stinger is lodged within your tissue “Bee’s

– Allergic reaction

How to help with Insect Bites:

1) Check the area, once the area is safe, Check the person and ensure the persons ABC’s are present “Airway / Breathing / CirculationREMEMBERWear gloves if available to avoid bodily fluids or from being bitten.

2) Call 911 and get an AED if you are alone, you suspect a Head / Neck or Spine injury, there is a motor vehicle collision, the person is allergic or the injured persons life could be at risk. “911 will link you to the Animal Control Center if you do not have the number.

3) Care for the Insect Bite by:

Always follow recommendations by your Emergency Response professionals and 911 Dispatch personnel. “Never endanger yourself or the victim, you may “not” need to move or roll the injured person”

– If there are other life threatening injuries, treat those first as quickly as possible with as little movement to the injured person.

a) STINGER EMBEDDED

– Using a hard thin smooth object “Credit Card

– Holding the skin taught scrape towards the stinger using the card “light even pressure” until the stinger comes free.

– Watch for signs of allergic reaction

– Wash with soap and water and seek medical attention if the person feels ill, light headed, or the swelling begins to spread.

b) TICK BITES

– If the tick hasn’t started to dig into the flesh, remove it by brushing it off the skin.

– If the tick has started to dig into the flesh, grasp the head of the tick with tweezers and pull it out gently not to crush the tick.

– If a rash or flu-like symptoms appear within a month after the tick bite, seek medical attention. “Lyme Disease” is a common disease for Tick’s to be infected with.

– Watch for signs of allergic reaction

– Wash with soap and water and seek medical attention if the person feels ill, light headed, or the swelling begins to spread.

c) SPIDER / SCORPION BITES

– If you are bitten, attempt to photograph the spider using your cell phone, or “Don’t endanger yourself” place the specimen in a sealed container. Doctors may need to double check to see if its toxic.

– If the wound begins to burn, raise up and spread there may be a toxic exposure.

RECOVERY Position:

  • 1) Kneel Beside the victim and place the victims furthest arm from you above their head.
  • 2) Place the arm closest to you across the victims chest as a protector arm.
  • 3) The Key is in their Knee, bend the nearest leg up at the knee.
  • 4) Carefully slip your hand under the hollow of the victims neck to support the Head Neck & Spine, at the same time use your forearm by slipping it carefully under the shoulder for leverage.
  • 5) Place your free hand on the Key Knee and gently roll the victim away from you by applying steady pressure against the knee and shoulder at the same time. The victims head should rest on their raised arm.
  • 6) To secure the position pull the key knee further up and bring their protector arm out to use the elbow to stabilize the position.
  • 7) Check the Airway to make sure their still breathing.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

Poison’s & how to help:

Poison’s & how to help:

There are many substances that we have in our environment that can be natural or even man made, many of these can be toxic or cause harsh chemical reactions to our bodies. Poisons are substances that have a harmful effect within the body if it is inhaled, swallowed, absorbed, or injected. Poisons are immediately life-threatening if they affect breathing or circulation. “When you treat someone who has been poisoned, you should take precautions to make sure that you do not come into contact with the poison yourself.

4 Routs of Exposure:

1) Injected – Enters the body through bites, stings or needles

2) Inhaled – Enters the body through the lungs “breathed in”

3) Ingested – Swallowed or contacts the lips & mouth

4) Absorbed – Enters through the skin from exposure

What it looks like:

  • 1) Injected – Puncture wound, problems breathing, pain, prescription medication or illegal drugs nearby, redness and swelling at the entry point.
  • 2) Inhaled – Breathing difficulties, irritated eye, nose or throat, vomiting, dizziness, seizures, bluish color around the mouth, unconsciousness, and unusual smell in the air, a cloud or plume in the air.
  • 3) Ingested – An open container of poison nearby, burns around the mouth, increased production of saliva and/or saliva that is an abnormal color, Abnormal cramps and vomiting, seizures, dizziness and or drowsiness, unconsciousness, a burning sensation in the mouth, throat or stomach, diarrhea.
  • 4) Absorbed – Rash, burning, itching, swelling blisters, hives “raised itchy area of skin”, burns, unconsciousness.

Prevention:

  • – Keep all medications, vitamins, household cleaners, hygiene products, decorative plants and other toxic substances well out of reach of children. “Duel Tab Child Locks are recommended”
  • – Use child-resistant safety caps on medications and other potentially toxic products.
  • – Treat all household, cosmetic or drugstore products as if they could be dangerous.
  • – Teach children to check with an adult before eating an unknown substance.
  • – Never call medicine “Candy or juice” to persuade a child to take it.
  • – Keep products in their “original” Containers with their original labels.
  • – Use poison symbols to identify dangerous substances and teach children what the symbols mean.
  • – All medicine bottles and boxes should be carefully labelled. Read the label three times when you are taking or giving medications.1) When you take the medication from the cupboard or refrigerator, 2) when you take the medication out of the package, 3) just before you assist the patient taking the medication.
  • – “Always follow your local legislation on Medication Administration” before you give any medication.
  • – Prescription medicine should be taken only by the person whom it was prescribed too, “never self medicate
  • – Carefully dispose of outdated medication by giving them to your pharmacist “Never flush down the toilet or throw in the garbage
  • – Wear proper protective clothing any time you may come into contact with a poisonous substance.
  • – Many cleaning products have toxic fumes, read the labels and use in a well ventilated area. “Always follow the manufacturers recommendations to avoid damage or injury.
  • – Mixing certain household cleaning products, such as “Bleach and ammonia or household cleaners, can create toxic fumes that may be fatal if inhaled or exposed.”

WHMIS or GHS “Workplace Hazardous Material Information System or Global Harmonization System”

  • – Always refer to your MSDS “Material Safety Data Sheet” before you use a new chemical, cosmetic or pharmaceutical.
  • – The MSDS will provide you with all “Who’s, Whats, Where’s, When’s, Why’s & How’s” of the chemical you are working with to avoid exposure or potentially harmful effects.
  • – Check all warning labels before use and replace warning labels that are damaged or unreadable.

“For more information on taking the WHMIS or GHS course please consult your local First Aid and Safety school for course listings, WHMIS or GHS is now available for Online certification and you may not need to “attend” and in class portion.”

How to help with Poisoning:

1) Check the area, once the area is safe, Check the person and ensure the persons ABC’s are present “Airway / Breathing / Circulation REMEMBER – Wear gloves if available to avoid bodily fluids or exposure to the chemical. A particle mask or SCBA “Self Contained Breathing Apparatus” may be needed to avoid inhaling chemicals in the air “Never run into a dangerous area where you suspect poisonous gas, wait for the rescue teams who are trained to do so“.

2) Call 911 and get an AED if you are alone, you suspect a Head / Neck or Spine injury, there is a motor vehicle collision, you suspect toxic gas, dangerous environment or the injured persons life could be at risk. “911 will link you to the Poison Control Center if you do not have the number.

3) Care for the Poisoned casualty by:

Always follow recommendations by your Emergency Response professionals and 911 Dispatch personnel. “Never endanger yourself or the victim, you may “not” need to move or roll the injured person”

  • – If there are other life threatening injuries, treat those first as quickly as possible with as little movement to the injured person.

a) Determine the type of exposure the person is experiencing “Injected, Inhaled, Absorbed or Ingested”

b) “Inhaled” Get the Person into fresh air, but “DO NOT” enter into ta hazardous atmosphere yourself to do so. Refer to the MSDS if available about treatments, listen to your 911 dispatcher for further treatments.

c) “Swallowed” Check the packaging of the poison if available and refer back to the MSDS if available about treatments, listen to your 911 dispatcher for further treatments.

d) “Absorbed” Check the packaging of the poison if available and refer back to the MSDS if available about treatments, listen to your 911 dispatcher for further treatments. – Flush the skin with cool running water for 15 minutes to “Dilute, remove and reduce the chemical reaction.

e) “Injected” Check the packaging of the poison if available and refer back to the MSDS if available about treatments, listen to your 911 dispatcher for further treatments. – keep the puncture site lower than the heart if possible, have the person rest comfortably, “NEVER” suck out the poison seek medical aid.

RECOVERY Position:

1) Kneel Beside the victim and place the victims furthest arm from you above their head.

2) Place the arm closest to you across the victims chest as a protector arm.

3) The Key is in their Knee, bend the nearest leg up at the knee.

4) Carefully slip your hand under the hollow of the victims neck to support the Head Neck & Spine, at the same time use your forearm by slipping it carefully under the shoulder for leverage.

5) Place your free hand on the Key Knee and gently roll the victim away from you by applying steady pressure against the knee and shoulder at the same time. The victims head should rest on their raised arm.

6) To secure the position pull the key knee further up and bring their protector arm out to use the elbow to stabilize the position.

7) Check the Airway to make sure their still breathing.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

Environmental Emergencies – Part 3 “Heat Exposure”

Environmental Emergencies – Part 3 “Heat Exposure”

Following our previous posts about Environmental Emergencies we will now go into “Heat Related Emergencies” and how they can go from bad to worse in only a short period of time.

Just remember that Thermal energy in either direction Hot or Cold will result in levels of severity and symptoms that are very similar but on opposite ends of the spectrum “Fire / Ice“, Lets focus on Heat exposure within the core of your body for this article and explain how a High core temperature can effect treatments .

To help with the explanation of Hyperthermia we must also bring in your “Normal Body Temperature 37C / 98.6F“. “Hyper” literally means “High” and “thermia” temperature, put them together and you get high temperature within your body. Your body has three stages of Hyperthermia “Heat Cramps / Heat Exhaustion & Heat Stroke” and each stage has its own symptoms until you reach about “41C or 106F” which would typically be unconsciousness.

Heat Exposure & What it looks like:

1) Heat Cramps -“37C to 38C” -Mild muscle contractions that can become severe, usually in the legs and abdomen but can be in other body parts, moist skin.

2) Heat Exhaustion – 38C to 40C – Raised Body temperature, moist skin, skin that is redder or paler than normal, nausea, dizziness, weakness, exhaustion, head aches and feeling ill. “Most people think this stage is Heat Stroke or Sun Stroke”

3) Heat Stroke – 39C to 41C – High body temperature, Red, Hot, Dry skin “no longer sweating”, irritable, bizarre, or aggressive behavior, rapid, weak pulse becoming irregular, Rapid, shallow breathing, seizures & progressive loss of consciousness.

Causes:

  • – Exposure to hot temperatures for too long.

Prevention of Hyperthermia:

“High body temperature”

  • – Drink plenty of cool fluids – This is the most important action you can take to prevent heat related emergencies “Not Energy Drinks”
  • – Avoid being outdoors during the hottest part of the day “around 3 pm”
  • – Slow down your activities as it gets hotter and don’t work or exercise for too long at a time.
  • – Take frequent breaks in a cool or shaded area to let your body cool off. This will help you cope better with short periods of extreme heat.
  • – Dress for the heat and for your activity level.
  • – Wear a hat when you’re in the sun. Wear light colored cotton clothing to absorb sweat and let air circulate and heat escape.
  • – Avoid caffeine and alcohol because they can cause dehydration, which stops your body from controlling its temperature properly.

How to Treat Hyperthermia: “High body temperature”

1) Check the area, once the area is safe, Check the person and ensure the persons ABC’s are present “Airway / Breathing / Circulation” REMEMBER – Wear gloves if available to avoid bodily fluids.

2) Call 911 and get an AED if the heat related injury includes seizures, altered personality, vomiting, unconsciousness or possible heat stroke, or EMS may be delayed.

3) Care for the Heat Exposure by:

Always follow recommendations by your Emergency Response professionals and 911 Dispatch personnel. “Never endanger yourself, you may not need to move the person”

a) If the patient is conscious and able to drink water, have them sip some cool water or electrolyte drinks. “Not energy Drinks

-b) If the patient is conscious have them then rest in a cool place

-c) Have the person loosen any tight clothing and if you are fanning remove any clothing that is soaked with sweat.

-d) Cool the person by putting cool water on the skin and fanning them to increase evaporation.

-e) If you suspect Heat Stroke remember “Hot is Fast / Cold is Slow” If cool water bottles, ice packs, or other cold sources are available put them in each armpit, the groin and the back of the neck. Cool the body any way you can, immerse the body in cool “not cold” water from the neck down. Or you can sponge the entire body with tepid or cool water or fan the person. “Cold water may put the person into shock

-f) If the person is alert, give him or her cool liquids to drink “No alcohol or caffeine”

-g) Continue care until EMS arrive or you seek further medical attention.

NOTES TO REMEMBER:

  • – Heat related emergencies will get worse without treatment and can change from one level to another very quickly. Never let someone with heat exhaustion or heat stroke “go to bed” without treatment.
  • – Febrile Seizure – A febrile seizure occurs when infants and children experience a rapid increase in temperature “Usually up to 40C or higher“. Infants with an “Armpit” temperature of 38C or higher and children with 40C and higher are in “Immediate danger!” Call 911 and seek medical attention immediately!
  • – If the person is having a seizure, and has a fever, call 911, keep the person in a safe position, and cool them down any way possible. The seizure often will stop spontaneously within 15 minutes or when the person is cooled down. “Always seek medical attention to rule out further damage”

As you can see, the treatment for heat Exposure in this tutorial is the same regardless of the name “Heat cramps / heat exhaustion or heat stroke“. Once you master the First Aid technique on how to aid a Thermal injury caused from a Heat source you can aid anyone who has been exposed to too much Heat energy. Just remember that it does not matter what the name of the Heat exposure injury is, the treatments are often the same “Hot is Fast & Cold is Slow“. You can help by remembering to “Treat the heat, with cool running water for 10-20 minutes, place cool packs in the armpits, groin and back of the neck, and if the patient is conscious have them sip cool water or electrolyte drinks..

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

First Aid Kits “Stocking List”

First Aid Kits “Stocking List”

One question that we get in our courses is “What should we put in our First Aid Kits?“, during any emergency a well stocked First Aid Kit can be the difference between life and death, infection control, stable spine and many more concerns. Emergencies are just that “Random“, so lets compile a stocking list for you to use in case you want to make your own First Aid Kit.

“Many prepackaged First Aid Kits are stocked for ease of use with a great selection of emergency supplies, you can normally purchase them at your local Safety Supply outlet, Pharmacy or even larger Chain Mega Stores.”

Where should I keep my First Aid Kit?

Best place to keep your first aid kit is in the kitchen under the sink or even in the bathroom. As many people seek sources of water during an emergency keeping your First Aid Kit where people go is a valuable resource. It is also recommended to keep an MSDS and an Emergency Response Plan in the same place you keep your First Aid Kit.”

First Aid Kit “Stocking List”

  • – Sterile gauze pads “dressings” in amall and large squares to place over wounds “6 each of the 2X2 and 4X4”
  • – Adhesive tape “Medical Tape 2 Rolls”
  • – Roller Gauze “2-4 Rolls”
  • – Triangular bandages “6 each” Good for slings and bandages.
  • – Adhesive Band-aids “various sizes” 12-24 each
  • – Scissors “EMS Grade if possible, Check Supply Sargent”
  • – Tweezers
  • – Safety Pins “X6”
  • – Ice Packs “X2”
  • – Hot Packs “X2”
  • – Nitrile Gloves “Not Latex” such as surgical or examination gloves
  • – Flashlight / Pen Light + extra batteries
  • – Antiseptic wipes, soap & hand sanitize
  • – Pencil & Pad
  • – Eye Patches or “4X4 gauze pad”
  • – Thermometer
  • – Pocket Masks & Barrier devices
  • – First Aid Manual
  • – Vaseline
  • – Ziploc Baggies 6X6 “X4”

“Spine Collars & Spine Boards are recommended in facilities with high impact machinery, equipment, tools, far distance from hospitals, veterinary outposts / training arena’s”

What is an Emergency Supply kit?

“An emergency supply kit is a kit that you can put together that has supplies ready for an emergency and can fit into a backpack or duffle bag so you can easily take them with you. Speed and ability to escape are the keys to this particular kit, they are recommended for homes that are prone to natural disaster or in high conflict areas”

Emergency Supply Kit “Stocking List”

  • – Four liters “One gallon” of water per person per day “Sealed unbreakable containers are best, swap water every six months” A portable survival water filter” you can find the survivalists water filter at many sporting goods stores.
  • – Packaged, canned or freeze dried food “Replace each year or before expiration date”
  • – Walking shoes, rain gear & a change of clothing
  • – Survival Blankets or compressed sleeping bags.
  • – First Aid Kit with Iodine, Polysporin, antiseptic wipes
  • – Toilet paper, bar of soap, toothpaste / brushes body wash
  • – Spare Cash
  • – Spare set of Car Keys
  • – A list of Family Doctors
  • – Family information: Such as medical conditions, members of the family, medical devices need ie:pacemaker.
  • – Photocopies of all important identification for you and your family, including health card numbers
  • – Special items for babies, elderly, or disabled household members.
  • – Cellphone & contact information for family and friends
  • – Directions to Hospital & 2 alternate safe locations known to all family members.
  • – Maps of your region
  • – Matches & Candles in a deep can that will burn for many hours
  • – Plant & Animal identification guide for your region

What should I keep for First Aid in my Vehicle?

“An Emergency Car Kit is always a great idea for those who find themselves traveling or commuting to work frequently. This will help prepare your vehicle with an easily accessible kit that may assist during a sudden emergency or break down”

Emergency Car Kit “Stocking List”

  • – A battery-powered radio & flashlight with extra batteries or is naturally chargeable”
  • – Survival Blanket
  • – Booster “jumper” cables
  • – Fire extinguisher
  • – First Aid Kit
  • – Bottled water & non-perishable high-energy foods “replace the water every six months with the food”
  • – Maps of your region
  • – A shovel
  • – Flares & Glow Sticks
  • – Tire repair kit / pump
  • – Matches & Candles in a deep can that will burn for many hours.

These kit “Stocking lists” are a good start to keeping your family prepared for emergencies. Many of the components can be easily purchased at your local Mega Mart, Sporting Goods Center and Pharmacy. For more information on what you can do to better prepare yourself and your family contact your local First Aid and Safety Training Schools.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

Sudden Medical Emergencies “Part 5 – Miscarriage”

Sudden Medical Emergencies “Part 5 – Miscarriage”

One heart felt and unfortunate emergency that you may have to deal with is a “Miscarriage”. A miscarriage is the spontaneous termination of a pregnancy and can often happen within the first 20 weeks after conception. Treating the mother for “Shock” will be the main focus of First Aid assistance during this traumatic emergency. There are some key steps to help, but the main point is to “remain calm, and supportive”.

Causes:

  • – Hormonal or Genetic Reasons
  • – Certain illnesses
  • – Abnormalities in the womb
  • – Age
  • – Infection
  • – Trauma
  • – Chemical exposure

What to watch for:

  • – Anxiety
  • – Cramp-like pain that is similar to labor or menstruation
  • – Vaginal bleeding

NOTES TO REMEMBER:

  • – Never pass judgement “Keep personal opinions in check
  • – Offer support and comfort
  • – Risk of miscarriage drops as pregnancy progresses
  • – Always consult a physician, your doctor will know what you can do to help reduce the risks of a preventable miscarriage.

How to help in Miscarriage:

1) Check the area, once the area is safe, Check the person and ensure the persons ABC’s are present “Airway / Breathing / CirculationREMEMBERWear gloves if available to avoid bodily fluids.

2) Call 911 and get an AED if you are alone, you suspect a Head / Neck or Spine injury, there is a motor vehicle collision, dangerous environment or the injured persons life could be at risk.

3) Care for the Miscarriage by:

Always follow recommendations by your Emergency Response professionals and 911 Dispatch personnel. “Never endanger yourself or the woman, you may “not” need to move or roll the woman”

  • – If there are other life threatening injuries, treat those first as quickly as possible with as little movement to the injured person.

a) Attempt to calm and comfort the woman.

b) “For Bleeding” Gently place a large dressing over the vaginal area. “DO NOT” put anything into the vagina.

c) Treat the woman for shock, perform a secondary survey and treat any non-life-threatening conditions.

d) Provide continual care until you see a Doctor or EMS arrive.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.