Tag Archives: BLS Renewal

Choking Infants, What to look for & How to Help:

Choking Infants, What to Look For & How to Help:

For many new parents choking can be one of the potentially biggest threats to a life of their newborn or infant. It can happen so fast and can be caused by just about anything as little ones seem to have a knack for putting just about everything into their mouth. Many Doctors will refer new parents to take a First Aid course prior to the arrival of their newest Minion to help prepare and arm them with the best techniques and knowledge in case of emergencies.

Age Groups can be tricky so we have the following break down, infants are from the age of 0-1 or when they begin to wear toddler size pants and are ambulatory, Children are from 1 to pubescence or 8 years old, anyone with signs of pubescence on is classified as an Adult. For this Post we will focus on Infants or Babies age 0 to 1.

Recognize Chocking in Infants:

Infants just like all age groups have a way to communicate and their basic language once you figure it out can be invaluable to any parent. All infants are equipped with the same “Body Language” which gives us as parents or guardians an edge on how to communicate with any infant. “Pooping Face is Pooping Face” no matter where your place of birth is, just like Choking face is Choking Face. Babies or Infants all have relatively the same reaction to Choking and the signs are easy to spot once you’ve seen them and been informed about them.

  • -The Baby will stiffen their arms either up above their head or straight out clenching their fist or have open palms
  • -The Baby will lean forward
  • The Baby will attempt to clear their own airway with a strained “cough” sound
  • -If the Babies airway is completely blocked no sound will be heard and rapid face color change may occur then unconsciousness.

For the Conscious Choking Baby “Don’t Waste Time

  1. 1) Crouch down & Sandwich the baby between your forearms supporting the head
  2. 2) Turn the Baby face down with the head lower than the body “Draw them in close to your body like a clutch or football
  3. 3) Lower your forearm with the baby onto your thigh so the head is lower than the feet and the infants back is facing you.
  4. 4) Deliver 5 FIRM BACK BLOWS between the shoulder blades to dislodge the object.
  5. 5) If the object has not been dislodged, while supporting the head roll/turn the baby face up with your supporting arm on your thigh.
  6. 6) Place 2 fingers on the middle of the chest just below the nipple line and “Push hard, Push Fast” about 1/3rd the depth of the chest delivering 5 FIRM CHEST THRUSTS.
  7. 7) Repeat the 5 FIRM BACK BLOWS & 5 FIRM CHEST THRUSTS until the object comes free or the infant becomes unconscious.

If the Baby becomes unconscious place them on a firm flat surface “Floor” and begin CPR immediately! 30 Compression 2 breaths, the object may come free once CPR has began. If you can see the object Never attempt to Grab it between your fingers & never perform a “Blind Finger Sweep” you only want to sweep for an object if you can see it.

To Perform a Finger Sweep:

1) Using your Pinkie Finger “Hook” your finger into their mouth using their cheek as a guide to slip your finger between the cheek and gums to the back of the throat behind the object.

2) “Roll” your wrist so that your pinkie finger is positioned under the object.

3) “Flick” the object free

  • -HOOK / ROLL / FLICK & BE QUICK That is the Pinkie Trick.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

#FirstAidCourseEdmonton #FirstAidAndBasicLifeSupport #BasicLifeSupport #BLS #BLSforHCP #BCLS #BCLSCourseEdmonton #ACLS #AdvancedCardiovascularLifeSupport #EMR #EmergencyMedicalResponder #ITLS #ChokingAdult #ChokingHowToHelp #HowToStopChoking #AbdominalThrusts #AbdominalJayThrusts #HeimlichManeuver #ChokingInfant #HowToStopInfantChoking

Choking, How to help and what to look for

Choking, How to help and what to look for.

Choking can happen to anyone of any age, and is one of the worst fears for many new parents as it happens fast causing serious problems including death. In most cases where the victim can still cough the object will come free on its own. However once the victim is unable to cough anymore the airway is potentially blocked and the victims life is now in jeopardy.

The most common causes of chocking include trying to swallow large pieces of food, eating while talking, walking or playing, being under the influence of an intoxicant or elicit substance while eating.

What to look for:

  • -Inability to speak, cough or breath
  • -Change in face color like bluish, red, or paler than normal
  • -Look of panic with wide eyes “Fear
  • -One or both hands clutching the throat or flailing
  • -High pitch whistle or noise when they attempt to breath or cough

In the Adult or Child once you have identified yourself and that you are going to attempt to help them:

  1. 1) Encourage the Victim to continue to cough the object free
  2. 2) If the victim can no longer cough, speak or breathe
  • -Stand or kneel beside the victim and wrap one arm diagonally across the victims chest
  • -Bend the victim forward at the waist at a 90 degree angle
  • -With the palm of your hand deliver 5 FIRM BACK BLOWS between the shoulder blades to encourage them to cough.

3) If the object has NOT come free in the first 5 Back Blows

  • -Quickly stand the victim up strait and place one hand in a first just above the belly button thumb side in.
  • -Place your other hand over your fist hand and pull sharply in and up in a ” J ” like Motion 5 Times

4) Repeat the 5 FIRM BACK BLOWS & the 5 ABDOMINAL J THRUSTS until they POP or DROP.

5) If the Victim becomes unconscious and is not breathing Call for help 911 and begin CPR 30 Compression, 2 Breaths, Repeat 5 Times in a row. After your 5th cycle of 30/2 if the victim is not breathing repeat until help arrives.

To prevent yourself or others from chocking just remind them to chew food well before swallowing, eat slowly and calmly, try not to talk, laugh or do physical activities while chewing and avoid mixing meals with other substances which could alter your personality.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

#FirstAidCourseEdmonton #FirstAidAndBasicLifeSupport #BasicLifeSupport #BLS #BLSforHCP #BCLS #BCLSCourseEdmonton #ACLS #AdvancedCardiovascularLifeSupport #EMR #EmergencyMedicalResponder #ITLS #ChokingAdult #ChokingHowToHelp #HowToStopChoking #AbdominalThrusts #AbdominalJayThrusts #HeimlichManeuver

What to do while you wait for an Ambulance

What to do while you wait for an Ambulance

After rescuing a victim there are many things that can be flowing through your mind. Did I do this right? Was my First Aid technique proper? Is there anything else I can do to help the patient? These questions are normal and there are even more that will pop in during an emergency.

Normally an Ambulance within an Urban setting can take anywhere from 5 too 25 minutes to respond, in Rural area’s response time can vary from 15 to 40 minutes an in most cases where distance is past 30 to 45 minutes a helicopter service may be deployed to meet you somewhere. In essence this means after you’ve rescued the victim you may have a little time to make sure that your First Aid techniques have helped.

We call this skill while your waiting a “Secondary Survey“, its your second chance to find something you might have missed during your primary survey. The Secondary Survey can be performed quite easily in two simple fashions, Hands On or Hands Off. What we mean by this is you can pat the person down from head to toe looking for injuries you might have missed “Hands On“, or “Hands Off” and ask the victim to tell you what’s going on.

Both techniques are easily performed but have their uses, the Hands on Check is normally performed for casualties rendered unconscious due to the emergency they experienced, and the Hands Off check likewise is performed for victims still conscious enough to walk you through the emergency by asking them the SAMPLE history questions.

What to Do while waiting for an emergency?

  1. 1) Care for the cause of the Emergency “Protect yourself
  2. 2) Have the victim rest in a position of comfort or the Recovery Position
  3. 3) Keep the victim warm
  4. 4) Ensure the victim is breathing and has an open airway
  5. 5) Offer comfort, warmth and reassurance
  6. 6) Double check “Hands on / Hands OffSAMPLE Questions
  • S – Signs & Symptoms -Whats wrong?
  • A – Allergies – Do you have any?
  • M – Medications – Are you on any?
  • P – Past Medical History – Has this happened before?
  • L -Last Meal – When / What did you eat?
  • E – Event – Do you remember everything?

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

“This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.”

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

#FirstAidCourseEdmonton #FirstAidAndBasicLifeSupport #BasicLifeSupport #BLS #BLSforHCP #BCLS #BCLSCourseEdmonton #ACLS #AdvancedCardiovascularLifeSupport #EMR #EmergencyMedicalResponder #ITLS #SampleHistory #WhatToDoWhileYouWaitForAnAmbulance

SHOCK – What to look for & How to Help

SHOCK – What to look for & How to Help

Shock is one of those things that all of us will experience sometime in our life and yet many of us have forgotten that it also can be a deadly scenario. “Shock Always Has A Cause” and that’s one thing that we can use to help us treat it, once you figure out what has caused it “Fix it” and shock will begin to lessen.

Shock happens when your body goes through a sudden internal or external event causing the body to demand more oxygen rich blood. In doing so the body will focus the remaining oxygen rich blood it has into key body parts to sustain your life and yet leave others unattended. Any vital organ which does not have enough blood or oxygen will eventually begin to fail. This is why “Shock Can Be Deadly“.

“Anyone can go into Shock, even those rescuing the casualties”

To make it easy just remember that it “Doesn’t Matter what caused the Casualty to go into shock” once you figure out what caused it “Fix it“.

Shock can often be caused by:

  • -Excessive Blood Loss – A Weak Heart – Extensive Burns – Infection – Excessive Fluid Loss – Fear or Anxiety – and many more

What to look for:

  • Altered Personality – Extreme Anxiety – Cool / Clammy Skin – Pale Skin tone – Confusion – Excessive thirst – Rapid Breathing – Nausea / Vomiting / weakness – Drowsiness.

How to help:

  • -Move or Remove the casualty “If possible” from the area that may be causing the shock.
  • -Assess the victim and find the root of the cause “Shock Always Has A Cause
  • -Offer comfort / warmth and reassurance
  • -Treat the cause of the shock and follow your local emergency response techniques.

Shock Treatments:

  • Altered Personality / Consciousness – Offer Comfort, warmth and reassurance while guiding the casualty away from danger or harm. Never restrain a casualty as they may lash out, find a position of comfort and wait for medical help to arrive or transport the patient using 911 recommendations to your local medical facility.
  • Extreme Anxiety – Offer Comfort, warmth and reassurance, respect the casualties personal comfort level’s and boundaries and assist the casualty in breathing exercises to help reduce anxiety. Be patient and monitor the casualties breathing, if their breathing becomes altered or they are uncontrollable contact 911 for help, “211” in Alberta is also another hot key number to use if you need to talk to a qualified mental health professional.
  • Blood Loss – Immediately Apply Direct Pressure to the wound with a clean non stick dressing, if bleeding persists and a pressure bandage around the dressing to secure a “Even” Pressure “Not tightYou do not want to “stop blood flow“, If bleeding persists add pressure points “The Pressure Points are in your Joints!” Place a rolled up piece of dressing or an object large enough to fit into the joint above the wound and have the casualty press the joint inward against the artery’s “This will help slow the blood flow“. Only” Apply a Tourniquet under the advisement of a 911 dispatcher.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

#FirstAidCourseEdmonton #FirstAidAndBasicLifeSupport #BasicLifeSupport #BLS #BLSforHCP #BCLS #BCLSCourseEdmonton #ACLS #AdvancedCardiovascularLifeSupport #EMR #EmergencyMedicalResponder #ITLS #Shock #HowToTreatShock

How to Place a casualty into the Recovery Position

How to place a casualty into the Recovery Position

There are many different ways to help a casualty during an emergency, but what can we do if we find someone unconscious? If the casualty is “Unconscious without Spine Injuries” the Recovery Position is designed to help keep the victims airway open as well as keeping the Head, Neck & Spine in a relatively strait line so that they can Recover. Many people have used this position not even thinking about it when they were even sick, injured or intoxicated.

To Perform the Recovery Position:

  1. 1) Kneel Beside the casualty and place the casualty furthest arm from you above their head.
  2. 2) Place the arm closest to you across the casualty’s chest as a protector arm.
  3. 3) The Key is in their Knee, bend the nearest leg up at the knee.
  4. 4) Carefully slip your hand under the hollow of the casualty’s neck to support the Head Neck & Spine, at the same time use your forearm by slipping it carefully under the shoulder for leverage.
  5. 5) Place your free hand on the Key Knee and gently roll the casualty away from you by applying steady pressure against the knee and shoulder at the same time. The casualty’s head should rest on their raised arm.
  6. 6) To secure the position pull the key knee further up and bring their protector arm out to use the elbow to stabilize the position.
  7. 7) Check the Airway to make sure their still breathing.

We never know what can happen, its always good to be prepared and have the knowledge we need to help those who need it.

This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

#FirstAidCourseEdmonton #FirstAidAndBasicLifeSupport #BasicLifeSupport #BLS #BLSforHCP #BCLS #BCLSCourseEdmonton #ACLS #AdvancedCardiovascularLifeSupport #EMR #EmergencyMedicalResponder #ITLS #RecoveryPosition #HowToDoTheRecoveryPosition

How to help a Conscious Drowning Person

How to help a Conscious Drowning Person

Drowning can be a very dangerous situation not only for the victim but also for those attempting to rescue people in danger of drowning. You should always refer to a special trained rescuer like a lifeguard to rescue someone by swimming out. The fear of drowning can cause a panic response in victims which can lead to the victim inadvertently dragging the rescuer down with them.

If you do see someone in danger of drowning and you have access to flotation devices like water-boards, pool noodles or something that you can hold out to reach the victim follow these simple steps:

  1. 1) lay down flat on the ground to gain an anchor point for your body, spread your legs and firmly brace yourself.
  2. 2) Hold out the object so that the victim can grab it.
  • -Brace yourself and pull the victim towards the edge of the water allowing the victim to secure themselves.

3) Help the victim from the water if safe to do so.

These steps are designed to help you in any emergency. The difference may be someones life.

This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

#FirstAidCourseEdmonton #FirstAidAndBasicLifeSupport #BasicLifeSupport #BLS #BLSforHCP #BCLS #BCLSCourseEdmonton #ACLS #AdvancedCardiovascularLifeSupport #EMR #EmergencyMedicalResponder #ITLS

#Drowning #HelpDrowiningVictim #WaterRescue

Should you move a casualty before providing care?

Should you move a casualty before providing care?

Moving a casualty before you provide care has been a question that almost every class brings up. Its a great question with a simple answer There are some reason’s when moving a person may be the only option to save their life or even prevent them from further injury. You may want to move a casualty if there are dangerous environments which could also do further harm to the patient, dangerous animals, toxins / poisons, or even machinery. One thing to remember “before” you move a casualty is “Will this make things better or worse?” You “do” have to weigh the situation vs desirable outcome, often the phrase used is “Life over Limb“. If the Casualties life is in immediate threat due to their surroundings “Move them away from the danger“, however, if moving them makes the situation worse and their surroundings are “not” an issue “Keep them in the position found or in a position of comfort.”

REMEMBER” You may not have to move a patient, if their “Spine” is in danger always refer to your 911 dispatcher for further advice before attempting First Aid techniques.

How to move a Patient from a dangerous environment:

  • Collar Drag – At the head of the patient – Roll the person’s clothing “Collar” behind their neck in a ball in your hand bunching their clothing under the armpits, bend with your knees and lift with your legs, drag the victim to safety.
  • One Arm Drag – Kneeling at the head of the victim slide the persons torso into your lap, lay one of the victims arms across their chest and reach through their opposite arm pit to grip their folded arms wrist, slip your other hand under the other arm pit and grip the folded arms forearm, bend with your knees, lift with your legs and drag to safety.
  • 2 Person Collar Drag – Combine the one arm drag technique with adding a partner, each rescuer should grab the collar on opposite sides of the victim and facing in the direction you wish to go bend with your knees and lift with your legs dragging them to safety.
  • 2 Person Carry – Combine the “one arm drag” technique to lift the victim’s torso and add a partner to lift the legs by folding them across each other gripping by the lower leg under the calf, face in the direction you wish to go, bend with your knees, lift with your legs and carry the victim to safety.

Learn First Aid Today, Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medial Academy Ltd

Above all else remember to Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Wast Time!!!

#HowToMoveCasualties #FirstAidTrainingEdmonton #BasicLifeSupportEdmonton #H2SAlive #AdvancedCardiovascularLifeSupport #BLSforHCP #HCPCPR #ACLS

Detached or Torn Nail, What should I do?

Detached or Torn Nail, What should I do?

You snag your nail on the car door, the bed frame, the corner of the coffee table “It can happen so quickly” or you absently chip you nail polish “Suddenly” your nail rips and your left with a torn nail, in some severe cases you can even separate a nail from your nail bed. Pain, discomfort and even blood loss can occur when you rip your nail either half way or completely off. “What should I do if my nail rips off? Should I rip the remaining torn nail off? How long doe a ripped nail take to heal?” Are some common questions we hope to address in this portion. As much as this hurts, be patient, the nail will heal if you take proper First Aid steps.

What causes a detached / torn nail?

It can be very painful to tear or rip your nail from the nail bed. A nail may separate from the nail bed “detach / rip” for many reasons including:

  • -Injuries – Separation caused by injury is common in people who have long finger or toenails. The nail may pry away from the nail bed when it is hit or jammed.
  • -Toe Stubbing – Severe or repetitive toe stubbing may cause a nail to detach. This is also common in athletes who wear shoes that do not have adequate space for motion.
  • -Fungal nail infections – When fungi invade a nail bed and the skin underneath the nail “nail bed”. Toenails are more commonly affected than fingernails, and symptoms include cracked, yellow, discolored, streaked, thickened, or spotted nails.
  • -Skin Conditions – Psoriasis
  • -Chemical Exposure – Some chemicals like “Nail Polish -Remover and even some soaps”
  • -Medications – Chemotherapy or ant malarial medicines can cause nail detachment
  • Severe Illness

After a nail separates from the nail bed for any reason, it will “not” reattach. A new nail will have to grow back in its place. Nails grow back “slowly”. It may take up to 6 months for a fingernail and up to 18 months for a toenail to grow back.

Prevention

  • -File any sharp edges smooth

-Trim nails short “within 2 millimeters” of flesh to avoid snagging “To avoid ingrown toenails leave the inset of the toenail a little longer to keep the edge from curling inwards.

  • -Clean under the nails to remove dirt and fungus
  • If your nail doesn’t look right “Color, Shape, Ridges” talk to a physician as your nail growth pattern may help in other diagnoses.

How to Treat a Detached Nail

Once a nail has been torn or detached, there is little that can be done to replace or repair it.” The main concern is damage to the adjacent tissue like nail bed, flesh and bone. If there seems to be a significant damage to areas around the nail, then a visit to a physician is recommended.

First Aid treatment often helps relieve pain, promote healing, and prevent infection. Treatment may involve removing the nail, keeping the area dry to prevent infection, and waiting for a new nail to grow. Infections and other skin conditions that can cause the separation of nail should be seen by a physician.

Nail Semi Attached

Do not Rip the remaining Nail off” The remaining parts of the old nail will help protect the tender flesh underneath as your new nail begins to grow back. Ripping the excess flesh off may cause excess bleeding and damage to the nail bed.

  1. 1) Stop Bleeding – Apply direct pressure with a clean cloth or bandage until the bleeding stops.
  2. 2) If there is remaining nail, use nail clips or scissors to trim the loose nail as close to the remaining nail bed as comfortable. The old nail will fall off one the new nail takes its place.
  3. 3) Clean the wound with clean water, soak your finger or toe in cool water for 20 minutes after trimming the nail.
  4. 4) Apply a thin layer of petroleum jelly “Vaseline” and cover the area with a non stick bandage.

To Prevent Infection

Let the wound breath so that it may heal, “Wounds that remain covered even with antibiotic ointment may become infected due to the lack of oxygen” Change your bandages often to keep it clean and let the new nail grow.

  • -Soak your foot or hand in a solution of 5 g “1 tsp” of salt dissolved in 1 L “4 Cups” warm water for 20 minutes, 2 or 3 times each day, for the next 3 days. Reapply petroleum jelly, and cover with a fresh adhesive bandage.
  • -Keep the nail bed dry, clean, and covered with petroleum jelly and an adhesive bandage until the nail bed is firm or the nail has grown back. Apply a new adhesive bandage whenever the bandage gets wet, discolored, or contaminated.

Watch for signs of infection such as increased heat, redness, pain, tenderness, swelling or pus. Remove an artificial nail if it separates from the nail bed. If you leave it on, the long, artificial nail can tear the nail bed.

When to see a Physician

Don’t hesitate to get professional help, chances of infection and doing more long term damage can outweigh not going in to a health care professional.

  • -If you are not comfortable with trimming the nail yourself
  • -Have diabetes, peripheral arterial disease, or an immune system problem. These problems may cause reduced blood flow and loss of feeling in the feet. Untreated nail injuries can lead to infection, foot ulcers, gang green, and other serious problems.
  • -The finger or toe is deformed, which may indicate fracture or dislocation.
  • -The wound looks deep or long enough to need stitches
  • -The nail is “completely” torn off or partially cut off from a crush injury or cut
  • -Discoloration or a bruise under the nail covers more than a quarter of the nail or there is continuing, intense pain that feels like “pressure”.

This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

Learn First Aid Today & Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy Ltd.

#FirstAidCourseEdmonton #FirstAidAndBasicLifeSupport #BasicLifeSupport #BLS #BLSforHCP #BCLS #BCLSCourseEdmonton #ACLS #AdvancedCardiovascularLifeSupport #EMR #EmergencyMedicalResponder #ITLS #DrivingToTheHospital

Basic Life Support Provider CPR-C “HCP”

Health Care Provider Level CPR “AKA” Basic Life Support Provider BLS
 
Over the years of helping students get the training they need for the employment they require, we have had countless questions on whether or not someone needs the Health Care Provider level CPR also known as Basic Life Support Provider or the general public version of CPR. We understand the confusion as many societies offer their own version of the HCP Health Care Provider CPR course. The final decision on what course a student needs is what their governing society accepts.
 
The general public version of CPR-C helps anyone wishing to learn the benefit of life saving skills on all age groups and helps to prepare to help in life threatening emergencies while you wait for Emergency Professionals to arrive.
 
Some different characteristics of Basic Life Support Provider CPR or Health Care Provider level CPR are the Program is broken down into different sections that show: Compression’s, Breaths, Bag Valve Mask Techniques, teamwork and the difference between Adult, Child and Infant in dealing with Airway obstructions while addressing the Medical Professional’s skills and knowledge.
 
As a comprehensive Video Based Program that sets the standards on all CPR skills for Health Care Providers. Basic Life Support Provider previously known as BLS for HCP CPR & AED and before that BCLS for HCP’s CPR & AED challenges medical professional students on their knowledge and skills on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation. As of November 2017 new standards and skills have been available for all Health Care Professionals to with the most up to date techniques and training information.
 
This year the life saving medication assistance of Naloxone has been added, also known as Narcan (an anti opiate medication used to help those in danger of overdose). The benefit of high quality team work in performing CPR and in the use of AEDs “automatic external defibrillators.” The 2015 version of Basic Life Support Provider focuses on honing the art of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation on all age groups.
 
In Alberta, Canada the governing body Alberta Health Services along with Covenant Health and Canada Health have set the standard and requested that all Medical Professionals have the Exact Same Training. This means they prefer all students and employees to have the same high quality standard of training and skills to achieve the highest quality of resuscitation during a life threatening event. “If ALL health care Professionals have the exact same training the chance of resuscitation go up”
 
Alberta Health Services, Covenant Health, and Canada Health Recommend, Prefer and Request that all Medical Personnel have their Health Care Provider Level CPR known as Basic Life Support Provider training through the Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation to keep continuity.
 
Alberta Health Services is setting a standard for all Health Care Professionals, doctors, nurses, paramedics, massage therapists, dentists, pharmacists, nurses aids, nurses attendants, and all personnel working in medical facilities to have Basic Life Support Provider CPR or BLS CPR, previously known as Basic Life Support BLS for Health Care Provider HCP CPR. This will ensure that no matter your job title you have the skills to help during an emergency.
 
This excellent program is set on a Video Format and takes roughly 4 hours to complete. This new BLS Basic LIfe Support Provider program through The Heart & Stroke Foundation has attempted to set the standard that every school and every student gets the exact same high quality training.
 
Basic Life Support Provider or BLS previously known as Basic Life Support for Health Care Providers HCP CPR has been shown to provide exactly what Alberta Health Services and many other Health Service Canada centers require and now demand their staff have as training.
 
Our Basic Life Support Program is run through our Edmonton Location with many time slots to chose from. As Alberta Health Services also recommends that due to liability, if your BLS CPR or Basic Life Support for Health Care Provider certificate expires you should not be allowed to work until it is reactivated. For this reason Saving Grace Medical has extended our BLS program course dates as of October 1st to “Monday Through Saturday” and even on Sundays upon request for groups. There will be more Basic Life Support Provider CPR/AED Level C courses available for our students.
 
Getting you the course you need, when you need it! We hope this has helped clear some information on standards set forward by Alberta Health Services.
 
We look forward to seeing you!
 
In any emergency just remember to Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!
 
“Learn First Aid in Edmonton Today, Save a Life Tomorrow with Saving Grace Medical Academy’s BLS & Safety Courses.”
 
#FirstAid #FirstAidCourseEdmonton #BLS #BCLS #BLSforHCP #BLSCourseEdmonton #ACLS #AdvancedCardiovascularLifeSupport #EMR #EmergencyMedicalResponder #ITLS

Should you drive an ill or injured person to the Hospital?

Should you drive an ill or injured person to the hospital?

This question gets asked by students taking our first aid courses all the time, and we do see the conundrum that many face in an Emergency as Liability, distance, Time or even a persons life may be at stake. For these very reasons we have come up with the simplest way to look at it.

Try not to……, but if you do decide to take a person to the hospital we have included some steps to keep you and the patient safe. Lets call this “Stay & Play VS Load & Go

Stay & Play =Wait for an Ambulance

  • Never drive an ill or injured person to the hospital if their condition is “Life Threatening” or spine related. The movement of being in a vehicle may adversely affect their injuries. You may not have to move the patient, your 911 Dispatcher will advise you on options you may have to secure the best medical aid given.

Load & Go = “Take them to a hospital

  • For “Non-Life Threatening” injuries or illness.
  1. Step #1 – “911 on Speaker Phone” – Have 911 on speaker phone so everyone knows what the dispatcher needs you to do. This will also let the hospital know you are coming.
  2. Step #2 – “Take a Partner” – Have a calm person drive while you continue care. Having a partner to help in an emergency setting can make all the difference. Emergencies can change.
  3. Step #3 – “You Can NOT Speed” – as your vehicle is not a designated emergency vehicle its lack of visibility and sirens will put you and others into danger if you attempt to break the rules of the road. Just remember, if you get there safely, the victim will too, Better safe than sorry.

This material is for information purposes only and is taken from The Canadian Red Cross / Alberta Heart & Stroke Foundation & Alberta Health Services. This information should not be used in place of medical, Technical advice, instructor, and/or treatment. If you have questions, speak to your local Physician or Safety Training Facility.

Just Remember:

Protect Yourself!!! Call 911!!! Don’t Waste Time!!!

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